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  • Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
    Saturday Jan 15, 1944

    Igor Stravinsky

    Stravinsky's incident with the Boston Police

    Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
    Saturday Jan 15, 1944

    Stravinsky's unconventional dominant seventh chord in his arrangement of the "Star-Spangled Banner" led to an incident with the Boston police on 15 January 1944, and he was warned that the authorities could impose a $100 fine upon any "re-arrangement of the national anthem in whole or in part". The police, as it turned out, were wrong. The law in question merely forbade using the national anthem "as dance music, as an exit march, or as a part of a medley of any kind", but the incident soon established itself as a myth, in which Stravinsky was supposedly arrested, held in custody for several nights, and photographed for police records.




  • Burbank, California, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 19, 1944

    The Wright brothers

    A Long Flight

    Burbank, California, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 19, 1944

    On April 19, 1944, the second production Lockheed Constellation, piloted by Howard Hughes and TWA president Jack Frye, flew from Burbank, California, to Washington, D.C. in 6 hours and 57 minutes (2300 mi – 330.9 mph).




  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Friday Apr 21, 1944

    Bretton Woods Conference

    International Monetary Fund

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Friday Apr 21, 1944

    Early in the Second World War, John Maynard Keynes of the British Treasury and Harry Dexter White of the United States Treasury Department independently began to develop ideas about the financial order of the postwar world. After negotiation between officials of the United States and United Kingdom, and consultation with some other Allies, a "Joint Statement by Experts on the Establishment of an International Monetary Fund," was published simultaneously in a number of Allied countries on April 21, 1944.




  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Thursday May 25, 1944

    Bretton Woods Conference

    The U.S. government invited the Allied countries to send representatives to an international monetary conference

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Thursday May 25, 1944

    On May 25, 1944, the U.S. government invited the Allied countries to send representatives to an international monetary conference, "for the purpose of formulating definite proposals for an International Monetary Fund and possibly a Bank for Reconstruction and Development".




  • Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
    Thursday Jun 15, 1944

    Bretton Woods Conference

    Preliminary conference

    Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
    Thursday Jun 15, 1944

    The United States also invited a smaller group of countries to send experts to a preliminary conference in Atlantic City, New Jersey, to develop draft proposals for the Bretton Woods conference. The Atlantic City conference was held from June 15–30, 1944.




  • New Hampshire, United States
    Saturday Jul 1, 1944

    Bretton Woods Conference

    Bretton Woods Conference

    New Hampshire, United States
    Saturday Jul 1, 1944

    The conference was held from July 1 to 22, 1944. Agreements were signed that, after legislative ratification by member governments, established the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF).




  • New Hampshire, United States
    Saturday Jul 1, 1944

    World Bank

    Bretton Woods conference

    New Hampshire, United States
    Saturday Jul 1, 1944

    Early in the Second World War, John Maynard Keynes of the British Treasury and Harry Dexter White of the United States Treasury Department independently began to develop ideas about the financial order of the postwar world. (See below on Keynes's proposal for an International Clearing Union.) After negotiation between officials of the United States and United Kingdom, and consultation with some other Allies, a "Joint Statement by Experts on the Establishment of an International Monetary Fund," was published simultaneously in a number of Allied countries on April 21, 1944. On May 25, 1944, the U.S. government invited the Allied countries to send representatives to an international monetary conference, "for the purpose of formulating definite proposals for an International Monetary Fund and possibly a Bank for Reconstruction and Development." (The word "International" was only added to the Bank's title late in the Bretton Woods Conference.) The United States also invited a smaller group of countries to send experts to a preliminary conference in Atlantic City, New Jersey, to develop draft proposals for the Bretton Woods conference. The Atlantic City conference was held from June 15–30, 1944.


  • New Hampshire, United States
    Wednesday Jul 19, 1944

    Bretton Woods Conference

    The main goal of the conference

    New Hampshire, United States
    Wednesday Jul 19, 1944

    The main goal of the conference was to achieve an agreement on the IMF. Enough consensus existed that the conference was also able to achieve an agreement on the IBRD. Doing so required extending the conference from its original closing date of July 19, 1944 to July 22.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Friday Sep 22, 1944

    United Nations

    Dumbarton Oaks Conference

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Friday Sep 22, 1944

    The UN was formulated and negotiated among the delegations from the Allied Big Four (the United States, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, and China) at the Dumbarton Oaks Conference from 21 September 1944 to 7 October 1944 and they agreed on the aims, structure and functioning of the UN.


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