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  • U.S.
    Sunday May 19, 1782

    George Washington

    Letter to General Moses Hazen

    U.S.
    Sunday May 19, 1782

    After the surrender at Yorktown a situation developed that threatened relations between the new American nation and Britain. Following a series of retributive executions between Patriots and Loyalists, Washington, on May 18, 1782, wrote in a letter to General Moses Hazen that a British Captain would be executed for the execution of Joshua Huddy a popular patriot leader among volunteers, who was hung at the direction of Loyalist Captain Lippincott. Washington wanted Lippincott himself to be executed but was declined.




  • Shimabara Peninsula of Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
    Tuesday May 21, 1782

    1792 Unzen earthquake and tsunami

    Two large earthquakes were followed by a collapse of the eastern flank of Mount Unzen's Mayuyama dome

    Shimabara Peninsula of Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
    Tuesday May 21, 1782

    On the night of 21 May, two large earthquakes were followed by a collapse of the eastern flank of Mount Unzen's Mayuyama dome, causing a landslide which swept through the city of Shimabara and into Ariake Bay, triggering a great tsunami.




  • Burgtheater, Vienna, Austria
    Tuesday Jul 16, 1782

    Mozart

    The Abduction from the Harem

    Burgtheater, Vienna, Austria
    Tuesday Jul 16, 1782

    By 16 July 1782, the new opera, The Abduction from the Harem, was ready and it was premiered at the Burgtheater, in the presence of the emperor, netting Mozart a much-needed 100 ducats.




  • U.S.
    Thursday Nov 14, 1782

    George Washington

    Letter to Charles Asgill

    U.S.
    Thursday Nov 14, 1782

    Subsequently, Charles Asgill was chosen instead, by a drawing of lots from a hat. This was a violation of the 14th article of the Yorktown Articles of Capitulation, which protected prisoners of war from acts of retaliation. Later, Washington's feelings on matters changed and in a letter of November 13, 1782, to Asgill, he acknowledged Asgill's letter and situation, expressing his desire not to see any harm come to him. After much consideration between the Continental Congress, Alexander Hamilton, Washington, and appeals from the French Crown, Asgill was finally released, where Washington issued Asgill a pass that allowed his passage to New York.




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