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  • U.S.
    Thursday Feb 5, 1789

    George Washington

    The state electors under the Constitution voted for the president

    U.S.
    Thursday Feb 5, 1789

    The delegates to the Convention anticipated a Washington presidency and left it to him to define the office once elected. The state electors under the Constitution voted for the president on February 4, 1789, and Washington suspected that most republicans had not voted for him. The mandated March 4 date passed without a Congressional quorum to count the votes, but a quorum was reached on April 5. The votes were tallied the next day, and Congressional Secretary Charles Thomson was sent to Mount Vernon to tell Washington he had been elected president. Washington won the majority of every state's electoral votes; John Adams received the next highest number of votes and therefore became vice president.




  • U.S.
    Thursday Feb 26, 1789

    George Washington

    Rift became openly hostile between Hamilton and Jefferson

    U.S.
    Thursday Feb 26, 1789

    Hamilton created controversy among Cabinet members by advocating the establishment of the First Bank of the United States. Madison and Jefferson objected, but the bank easily passed Congress. Jefferson and Randolph insisted that the new bank was beyond the authority granted by the constitution, as Hamilton believed. Washington sided with Hamilton and signed the legislation on February 25, and the rift became openly hostile between Hamilton and Jefferson.




  • New York, U.S.
    Friday Apr 24, 1789

    George Washington

    Anxious and painful sensations

    New York, U.S.
    Friday Apr 24, 1789

    Washington had "anxious and painful sensations" about leaving the "domestic felicity" of Mount Vernon, but departed for New York City on April 23 to be inaugurated.




  • New York, U.S.
    Friday May 1, 1789

    George Washington

    President of the United States

    New York, U.S.
    Friday May 1, 1789

    Washington was inaugurated on April 30, 1789, taking the oath of office at Federal Hall in New York City.




  • U.S.
    Thursday Nov 26, 1789

    Thanksgiving

    First nationwide thanksgiving celebration

    U.S.
    Thursday Nov 26, 1789

    As President of the United States, George Washington proclaimed the first nationwide thanksgiving celebration in America marking November 26, 1789, "as a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God".




  • Federal Hall, New York, U.S.
    Friday Nov 27, 1789

    George Washington

    Thanksgiving

    Federal Hall, New York, U.S.
    Friday Nov 27, 1789

    Washington proclaimed November 26 as a day of Thanksgiving in order to encourage national unity. "It is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor." He spent that day fasting and visiting debtors in prison to provide them with food and beer.




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