Historydraft LogoHistorydraft Logo HistorydraftbetaHistorydraft Logo Historydraftbeta

  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Saturday Mar 4, 1865

    Abraham Lincoln

    Lincoln delivered his second inaugural address

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Saturday Mar 4, 1865

    On March 4, 1865, Lincoln delivered his second inaugural address. In it, he deemed the war casualties to be God's will. Lincoln said: Fondly do we hope—fervently do we pray—that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue, until all the wealth piled by the bond-man's 250 years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash, shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said 3,000 years ago, so still it must be said, "the judgments of the Lord, are true and righteous altogether". With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan—to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations.




  • Petersburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Saturday Apr 1, 1865

    Abraham Lincoln

    Grant nearly encircled Petersburg in a siege

    Petersburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Saturday Apr 1, 1865

    As Grant continued to weaken Lee's forces, efforts to discuss peace began. Confederate Vice President Stephens led a group meeting with Lincoln, Seward, and others at Hampton Roads. Lincoln refused to negotiate with the Confederacy as a coequal; his objective to end the fighting was not realized. On April 1, 1865, Grant nearly encircled Petersburg in a siege. The Confederate government evacuated Richmond and Lincoln visited the conquered capital. On April 9, Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, officially ending the war.




  • Appomattox, Virginia, U.S.
    Saturday Apr 8, 1865

    Abraham Lincoln

    Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox

    Appomattox, Virginia, U.S.
    Saturday Apr 8, 1865

    On April 9, Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, officially ending the war.




  • Appomattox, Virginia, U.S.
    Sunday Apr 9, 1865

    Juneteenth

    General Robert E. Lee surrendered

    Appomattox, Virginia, U.S.
    Sunday Apr 9, 1865

    Despite the surrender of General Robert E. Lee at the Old Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, the western Army of the Trans-Mississippi did not surrender until June 2.




  • Ford's Theatre, Washington, D.C., U.S.
    Friday Apr 14, 1865

    Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

    The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

    Ford's Theatre, Washington, D.C., U.S.
    Friday Apr 14, 1865

    The assassination of Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, just days after the Army of Northern Virginia's surrender at Appomattox briefly lessened the tension over who would set the terms of peace. The radicals, while suspicious of the new president and his policies, believed, based upon his record, that Andrew Johnson would defer, or at least acquiesce to their hardline proposals.




  • Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Illinois, U.S.
    Friday Apr 21, 1865

    Abraham Lincoln

    Funeral

    Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Illinois, U.S.
    Friday Apr 21, 1865

    The late President lay in state, first in the East Room of the White House, and then in the Capitol Rotunda from April 19 through April 21. The caskets containing Lincoln's body and the body of his son Willie traveled for three weeks on the Lincoln Special funeral train. The train followed a circuitous route from Washington D.C. to Springfield, Illinois, stopping at many cities for memorials attended by hundreds of thousands.




  • Virginia, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 26, 1865

    Abraham Lincoln

    Booth died

    Virginia, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 26, 1865

    Two weeks later, Booth was tracked to a farm in Virginia, and refusing to surrender, he was mortally shot by Sergeant Boston Corbett and died on April 26.


  • Jackson, Mississippi, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 26, 1865

    Memorial day

    Sue Landon Vaughan decorations

    Jackson, Mississippi, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 26, 1865

    On April 26, 1865, in Jackson, Mississippi, Sue Landon Vaughan supposedly decorated the graves of Confederate and Union soldiers. However, the earliest recorded reference to this event did not appear until many years after the fact and is considered a myth. Regardless, mention of the observance is inscribed on a southeast panel of the Confederate Monument in Jackson, erected in 1891.


  • Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
    Monday May 1, 1865

    Memorial day

    African-Americans parade

    Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
    Monday May 1, 1865

    On May 1, 1865, in Charleston, South Carolina, recently freed African-Americans held a parade of 10,000 people to honor 257 dead Union soldiers, whose remains they had reburied from a mass grave in a Confederate prison camp. Historian David W. Blight cites contemporary news reports of this incident in the Charleston Daily Courier and the New-York Tribune. Although Blight claimed that "African Americans invented Memorial Day in Charleston, South Carolina", in 2012, he stated that he "has no evidence" that the event in Charleston inspired the establishment of Memorial Day across the country. Accordingly, investigators for Time Magazine, LiveScience, RealClearLife and Snopes have called this conclusion into question.


  • Tampere, Finland
    Friday May 12, 1865

    Nokia

    Establishement

    Tampere, Finland
    Friday May 12, 1865

    Nokia's history dates back to 1865, when Finnish-Swede mining engineer Fredrik Idestam established a pulp mill near the town of Tampere, Finland (then in the Russian Empire).


  • U.S.
    Tuesday Jul 4, 1865

    Flag of the United States

    Star for Nevada

    U.S.
    Tuesday Jul 4, 1865

    The flag was changed to have 36 stars. (for Nevada)


  • Algeria
    Friday Jul 14, 1865

    Algerian War

    Code de l'indigénat

    Algeria
    Friday Jul 14, 1865

    Under the Second Empire (1852–1871), the Code de l'indigénat (Indigenous Code) was implemented by the Sénatus-consulte of July 14, 1865. It allowed Muslims to apply for full French citizenship, a measure that few took, since it involved renouncing the right to be governed by sharia law in personal matters and was considered a kind of apostasy.


  • U.S.
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1865

    Abraham Lincoln

    Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

    U.S.
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1865

    After implementing the Emancipation Proclamation, Lincoln increased pressure on Congress to outlaw slavery throughout the nation with a constitutional amendment. He declared that such an amendment would "clinch the whole matter" and by December 1863 an amendment was brought to Congress. This first attempt fell short of the required two-thirds majority in the House of Representatives. Passage became part of the Republican/Unionist platform, and after a House debate the second attempt passed on January 31, 1865. With ratification, it became the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution on December 6, 1865.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1865

    Juneteenth

    Thirteenth Amendment ratified

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1865

    Although this event is popularly thought of as "the end of slavery", the Emancipation Proclamation did not apply to those enslaved in Union-held territory, who would not be freed until a proclamation several months later, on December 18, 1865, stating that the Thirteenth Amendment had been ratified on December 6, 1865.


<