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  • Weihai, Shandong, China
    Saturday Jan 12, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Capturing Weihaiweii

    Weihai, Shandong, China
    Saturday Jan 12, 1895

    The Chinese fleet subsequently retreated behind the Weihaiwei fortifications. However, they were then surprised by Japanese ground forces, who outflanked the harbour's defenses in coordination with the navy. The Battle of Weihaiwei was a 23-day siege with the major land and naval components taking place between 20 January and 12 February 1895. Historian Jonathan Spence notes that "the Chinese admiral retired his fleet behind a protective curtain of contact mines and took no further part in the fighting." The Japanese commander marched his forces over the Shandong peninsula and reached the landward side of Weihaiwei, were the siege was eventually successful for the Japanese.




  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Saturday Feb 2, 1895

    Frederick Douglass

    Death

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Saturday Feb 2, 1895

    On February 20, 1895, Douglass attended a meeting of the National Council of Women in Washington, D.C. During that meeting, he was brought to the platform and received a standing ovation. Shortly after he returned home, Douglass died of a massive heart attack. He was 77. Douglass' coffin was transported back to Rochester, New York, where he had lived for 25 years, longer than anywhere else in his life. He was buried next to Anna in the Douglass family plot of Mount Hope Cemetery, and Helen joined them in 1903.




  • Yingkou, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Mar 5, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Battle of Yingkou

    Yingkou, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Mar 5, 1895

    After Weihaiwei's fall on 12 February 1895, and an easing of harsh winter conditions, Japanese troops pressed further into southern Manchuria and northern China. By March 1895 the Japanese had fortified posts that commanded the sea approaches to Beijing. Although this would be the last major battle fought; numerous skirmishes would follow. The Battle of Yinkou was fought outside the port town of Yingkou, Manchuria, on 5 March 1895.




  • Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Wednesday Mar 6, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Starting Preparations For The Capture of Taiwan

    Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Wednesday Mar 6, 1895

    the Japanese had begun preparations for the capture of Taiwan. However, the first operation would be directed not against the island itself, but against the Pescadores Islands, which due to their strategic position off the west coast would become a stepping stone for further operations against the island. On March 6, a Japanese expeditionary force consisting of a reinforced infantry regiment with 2,800 troops and an artillery battery were embarked on five transports, sailed from Ujina to Sasebo, arriving there three days later.




  • New York City, New York, U.S.
    Wednesday Mar 13, 1895

    Nikola Tesla

    South Fifth Avenue building that housed Tesla's lab caught fire

    New York City, New York, U.S.
    Wednesday Mar 13, 1895

    In the early morning hours of 13 March 1895, the South Fifth Avenue building that housed Tesla's lab caught fire. It started in the basement of the building and was so intense Tesla's 4th floor lab burned and collapsed into the second floor. The fire not only set back Tesla's ongoing projects, it destroyed a collection of early notes and research material, models, and demonstration pieces, including many that had been exhibited at the 1893 Worlds Colombian Exposition. Tesla told The New York Times "I am in too much grief to talk. What can I say?" After the fire Tesla moved to 46 & 48 East Houston Street and rebuilt his lab on the 6th and 7th floors.




  • Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Friday Mar 15, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Leaving Sasebo Heading To The Pescadores

    Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Friday Mar 15, 1895

    On March 15, the five transports were escorted by seven cruisers and five torpedo boats of the 4th Flotilla, left Sasebo heading south to the Pescadores .




  • Pescadores, Taiwan
    Wednesday Mar 20, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Arriving at The Pescadores

    Pescadores, Taiwan
    Wednesday Mar 20, 1895

    The Japanese fleet arrived at the Pescadores during the night of March 20, but encountered stormy weather. Due to the poor weather, the landings were postponed until March 23, when the weather cleared.


  • Makung Harbor, Taiwan
    Monday Mar 25, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Entering Magong Harbor

    Makung Harbor, Taiwan
    Monday Mar 25, 1895

    The Japanese warships entered the strait the next day and, upon discovering that there were no mine fields, they entered Magong harbor.


  • Tübingen, Kingdom of Württemberg (Present Day Tübingen, Germany)
    Friday Apr 12, 1895

    Lothar Meyer

    Death

    Tübingen, Kingdom of Württemberg (Present Day Tübingen, Germany)
    Friday Apr 12, 1895

    Meyer served until his death from a stroke on April 11, 1895 at the age of 64.


  • Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi, Japan
    Tuesday Apr 16, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Treaty of Shimonoseki

    Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi, Japan
    Tuesday Apr 16, 1895

    The Treaty of Shimonoseki was signed on 17 April 1895. The Qing Empire recognized the total independence of Korea and ceded the Liaodong Peninsula, Taiwan and Penghu Islands to Japan "in perpetuity".


  • China
    Wednesday Apr 17, 1895

    Xinhai Revolution

    The First Sino-Japanese War

    China
    Wednesday Apr 17, 1895

    In the wars against the Taiping (1851–64), Nian (1851–68), Yunnan (1856–68) and the Northwest (1862–77), the traditional imperial troops proved themselves incompetent and the court came to rely on local armies. In 1895, China suffered another defeat during the First Sino-Japanese War. This demonstrated that traditional Chinese feudal society also needed to be modernized if the technological and commercial advancements were to succeed.


  • Taiwan
    Thursday May 23, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Declaring Taiwan To be an independent Republic of Formosa

    Taiwan
    Thursday May 23, 1895

    Several Qing officials in Taiwan resolved to resist the cession of Taiwan to Japan under the Treaty of Shimonoseki, and on 23 May declared the island to be an independent Republic of Formosa.


  • Taiwan
    Wednesday May 29, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Japanese Forces Occupied Taiwan's main Towns

    Taiwan
    Wednesday May 29, 1895

    On 29 May, Japanese forces under Admiral Motonori Kabayama landed in northern Taiwan, and in a five-month campaign defeated the Republican forces and occupied the island's main towns.


  • Sceaux, France
    Friday Jul 26, 1895

    Marie Curie

    Marriage

    Sceaux, France
    Friday Jul 26, 1895

    On 26 July 1895 Pierre Curie married Marie in Sceaux (Seine).


  • Turkey (then Ottoman Empire)
    Tuesday Oct 1, 1895

    Armenian Genocide

    2,000 Armenians assembled in Constantinople

    Turkey (then Ottoman Empire)
    Tuesday Oct 1, 1895

    On 1 October 1895, 2,000 Armenians assembled in Constantinople to petition for the implementation of the reforms, but Ottoman police units violently broke the rally up. Soon, massacres of Armenians broke out in Constantinople and then engulfed the rest of the Armenian-populated provinces of Bitlis, Diyarbekir, Erzurum, Harput, Sivas, Trabzon, and Van. Estimates differ on how many Armenians were killed, but European documentation of the pogroms, which became known as the Hamidian massacres, placed the figures at between 100,000 and 300,000.


  • Tainan, Taiwan
    Monday Oct 21, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Surrender of The Republican Capital Tainan

    Tainan, Taiwan
    Monday Oct 21, 1895

    The campaign effectively ended on 21 October 1895, with the flight of Liu Yongfu, the second Republican president, and the surrender of the Republican capital Tainan.


  • Guangzhou, China
    Saturday Oct 26, 1895

    Xinhai Revolution

    The First Guangzhou Uprising

    Guangzhou, China
    Saturday Oct 26, 1895

    On 26 October 1895, Yeung Ku-wan and Sun Yat-sen led Zheng Shiliang and Lu Haodong to Guangzhou, preparing to capture Guangzhou in one strike. However, the details of their plans were leaked to the Qing government. The government began to arrest revolutionaries, including Lu Haodong, who was later executed. The first Guangzhou uprising was a failure.


  • Germany
    Friday Nov 8, 1895

    X-ray

    Discovery by Röntgen

    Germany
    Friday Nov 8, 1895

    On November 8, 1895, German physics professor Wilhelm Röntgen stumbled on X-rays while experimenting with Lenard tubes and Crookes tubes and began studying them.


  • Paris, France
    Wednesday Nov 27, 1895

    Alfred Nobel

    Nobel signed his last will

    Paris, France
    Wednesday Nov 27, 1895

    On 27 November 1895, at the Swedish-Norwegian Club in Paris, Nobel signed his last will and testament and set aside the bulk of his estate to establish the Nobel Prizes, to be awarded annually without distinction of nationality.


  • Paris, France
    Wednesday Nov 27, 1895

    Nobel Prize

    Nobel's well

    Paris, France
    Wednesday Nov 27, 1895

    Signing his well at the Swedish–Norwegian Club in Paris on 27 November 1895. To widespread astonishment, Nobel's last will specified that his fortune be used to create a series of prizes for those who confer the "greatest benefit on mankind" in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. Nobel bequeathed 94% of his total assets, 31 million SEK (US$186 million in 2008), to establish the five Nobel Prizes.


  • Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany
    Saturday Dec 28, 1895

    X-ray

    First paper written about X-rays

    Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany
    Saturday Dec 28, 1895

    On December 28, 1895 submitted it to Würzburg's Physical-Medical Society journal. This was the first paper written on X-rays. Röntgen referred to the radiation as "X", to indicate that it was an unknown type of radiation. The name stuck, although (over Röntgen's great objections) many of his colleagues suggested calling them Röntgen rays.


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