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  • Ladysmith, South Africa
    Tuesday Jan 23, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Battle of Spion Kop

    Ladysmith, South Africa
    Tuesday Jan 23, 1900

    The Battle of Spion Kop was fought about 38 km (24 mi) west-south-west of Ladysmith on the hilltop of Spioenkop along the Tugela River, Natal in South Africa from 23–24 January 1900. It was fought between the South African Republic and the Orange Free State on the one hand and British forces during the Second Boer War campaign to relieve Ladysmith. It resulted in a Boer victory. The battle, collectively with its location at a hill, has gone down in British football lore as the namesake of a common British term for single-tier terraces and/or stands at football stadia.




  • Ladysmith, South Africa
    Wednesday Jan 24, 1900

    Second Boer War

    British troops captured the summit by surprise

    Ladysmith, South Africa
    Wednesday Jan 24, 1900

    British troops captured the summit by surprise during the early hours of 24 January 1900, but as the early morning fog lifted they realised too late that they were overlooked by Boer gun emplacements on the surrounding hills. The result was 350 men killed and nearly 1,000 wounded and a retreat across the Tugela River into British territory. There were nearly 300 Boer casualties.




  • South Africa
    Saturday Feb 10, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Roberts launched his main attack

    South Africa
    Saturday Feb 10, 1900

    Roberts launched his main attack on 10 February 1900 and although hampered by a long supply route, managed to outflank the Boers defending Magersfontein. Field Marshal Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts was a British Victorian era general who became one of the most successful British military commanders of his time. Born in India to an Anglo-Irish family, Roberts joined the East India Company Army and served as a young officer in the Indian Rebellion during which he won a Victoria Cross for gallantry. He was then transferred to the British Army and fought in the Expedition to Abyssinia and the Second Anglo-Afghan War, in which his exploits earned him widespread fame. Roberts would go on to serve as the Commander-in-Chief, India before leading British Forces to success in the Second Boer War. He also became the last Commander-in-Chief of the Forces before the post was abolished in 1904.




  • Colenso, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
    Wednesday Feb 14, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Battle of the Tugela Heights

    Colenso, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
    Wednesday Feb 14, 1900

    In Natal, the Battle of the Tugela Heights, which started on 14 February was Buller's fourth attempt to relieve Ladysmith. The losses Buller's troops had sustained convinced Buller to adopt Boer tactics "in the firing line—to advance in small rushes, covered by rifle fire from behind; to use the tactical support of artillery; and above all, to use the ground, making rock and earth work for them as it did for the enemy." Despite reinforcements his progress was painfully slow against stiff opposition.




  • Kimberley, South Africa
    Wednesday Feb 14, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Cavalry division under Major General John French launched a major attack to relieve Kimberley

    Kimberley, South Africa
    Wednesday Feb 14, 1900

    On 14 February, a cavalry division under Major General John French launched a major attack to relieve Kimberley. Although encountering severe fire, a massed cavalry charge split the Boer defenses on 15 February, opening the way for French to enter Kimberley that evening, ending its 124 days' siege.




  • South Africa
    Saturday Feb 17, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Pincer movement involving both French's cavalry and the main British force attempted to take the entrenched position

    South Africa
    Saturday Feb 17, 1900

    On 17 February, a pincer movement involving both French's cavalry and the main British force attempted to take the entrenched position, but the frontal attacks were uncoordinated and so were easily repulsed by the Boers. Finally, Roberts resorted to bombarding Cronjé into submission, but it took a further ten precious days, and with the British troops using the polluted Modder River as water supply, there was a typhoid epidemic killing many troops. General Cronjé was forced to surrender at Surrender Hill with 4,000 men.




  • Paardeberg Drift, South Africa
    Sunday Feb 18, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Battle of Paardeberg

    Paardeberg Drift, South Africa
    Sunday Feb 18, 1900

    The Battle of Paardeberg or Perdeberg ("Horse Mountain") was a major battle during the Second Anglo-Boer War. It was fought near Paardeberg Drift on the banks of the Modder River in the Orange Free State near Kimberley. Lord Methuen advanced up the railway line in November 1899 with the objective of relieving the besieged city of Kimberley (and the town of Mafeking, also under siege). Battles were fought on this front at Graspan, Belmont, Modder River before the advance was halted for two months after the British defeat at the Battle of Magersfontein. In February 1900, Field Marshal Lord Roberts assumed personal command of a significantly reinforced British offensive.


  • Colenso, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
    Monday Feb 26, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Buller used all his forces in one all-out attack for the first time and at last succeeded in forcing a crossing of the Tugela

    Colenso, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
    Monday Feb 26, 1900

    On 26 February, after much deliberation, Buller used all his forces in one all-out attack for the first time and at last succeeded in forcing a crossing of the Tugela to defeat Botha's outnumbered forces north of Colenso.


  • Ladysmith, South Africa
    Tuesday Feb 27, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Siege lasting

    Ladysmith, South Africa
    Tuesday Feb 27, 1900

    After a siege lasting 118 days, the Relief of Ladysmith was effected, the day after Cronjé surrendered, but at a total cost of 7,000 British casualties. Buller's troops marched into Ladysmith on 28 February.


  • Poplar Grove, South Africa
    Wednesday Mar 7, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Battle of Poplar Grove

    Poplar Grove, South Africa
    Wednesday Mar 7, 1900

    Battle of Poplar Grove. was an incident on 7 March 1900 during the Second Boer War in South Africa. It followed on from the Relief of Kimberley as the British Army moved to take the Boer capital of Bloemfontein. The Boers were demoralized following the surrender of Piet Cronjé at the Battle of Paardeberg.


  • South Africa
    Tuesday Mar 13, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Roberts then advanced into the Orange Free State from the west, putting the Boers to flight at the Battle of Poplar Grove and capturing Bloemfontein

    South Africa
    Tuesday Mar 13, 1900

    After a succession of defeats, the Boers realized that against such overwhelming numbers of troops, they had little chance of defeating the British and so became demoralized. Roberts then advanced into the Orange Free State from the west, putting the Boers to flight at the Battle of Poplar Grove and capturing Bloemfontein, the capital, unopposed on 13 March with the Boer defenders escaping and scattering. Meanwhile, he detached a small force to relieve Baden-Powell.


  • South Africa
    Thursday Mar 15, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Lord Roberts proclaimed an amnesty for all burghers, except leaders

    South Africa
    Thursday Mar 15, 1900

    On 15 March 1900, Lord Roberts proclaimed an amnesty for all burghers, except leaders, who took an oath of neutrality and returned quietly to their homes. It is estimated that between 12,000 and 14,000 burghers took this oath between March and June 1900.


  • Bloemfontein, South Africa
    Saturday Mar 31, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Sanna's Post

    Bloemfontein, South Africa
    Saturday Mar 31, 1900

    British observers believed the war to be all but over after the capture of the two capital cities. However, the Boers had earlier met at the temporary new capital of the Orange Free State, Kroonstad, and planned a guerrilla campaign to hit the British supply and communication lines. The first engagement of this new form of warfare was at Sanna's Post on 31 March where 1,500 Boers under the command of Christiaan de Wet attacked Bloemfontein's waterworks about 37 kilometres (23 mi) east of the city, and ambushed a heavily escorted convoy, which caused 155 British casualties and the capture of seven guns, 117 wagons, and 428 British troops.


  • Grand Palais, Petit Palais, Paris Métro in Paris, France
    Saturday Apr 14, 1900

    W. E. B. Du Bois

    Paris Exhibition of 1900

    Grand Palais, Petit Palais, Paris Métro in Paris, France
    Saturday Apr 14, 1900

    Du Bois was primary organizer of The Exhibit of American Negroes at the Exposition Universelle held in Paris between April and November 1900, for which he put together a series of 363 photographs aiming to commemorate the lives of African Americans at the turn of the century and challenge the racist caricatures and stereotypes of the day.


  • Tiflis, Tiflis Governorate, Caucasus Viceroyalty, Russian Empire Or Georgia
    Tuesday May 1, 1900

    Joseph Stalin

    May day 1900

    Tiflis, Tiflis Governorate, Caucasus Viceroyalty, Russian Empire Or Georgia
    Tuesday May 1, 1900

    Co-organised a secret workers' mass meeting for May Day 1900, at which he successfully encouraged many of the men to take strike action. By this point, the empire's secret police—the Okhrana—were aware of Stalin's activities within Tiflis' revolutionary milieu. They attempted to arrest him in March 1901, but he escaped and went into hiding, living off the donations of friends and sympathizers.


  • Mafeking, South Africa
    Friday May 18, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Relief of Mafeking

    Mafeking, South Africa
    Friday May 18, 1900

    The Relief of Mafeking on 18 May 1900 provoked riotous celebrations in Britain, the origin of the Edwardian slang word "mafficking".


  • South Africa
    Monday May 28, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Orange Free State was annexed and renamed the Orange River Colony

    South Africa
    Monday May 28, 1900

    On 28 May, the Orange Free State was annexed and renamed the Orange River Colony.


  • Pretoria, South Africa
    Tuesday Jun 5, 1900

    Second Boer War

    The Capital was captured

    Pretoria, South Africa
    Tuesday Jun 5, 1900

    Roberts was forced to halt again at Kroonstad for 10 days, due once again to the collapse of his medical and supply systems, but finally captured Johannesburg on 31 May and the capital of the Transvaal, Pretoria, on 5 June.


  • Velp, Gelderland, Netherlands
    Tuesday Jun 12, 1900

    Audrey Hepburn

    Mother Ella

    Velp, Gelderland, Netherlands
    Tuesday Jun 12, 1900

    Hepburn's mother, Baroness Ella van Heemstra (12 June 1900 – 26 August 1984), was a Dutch noblewoman. She was the daughter of Baron Aarnoud van Heemstra, who served as Mayor of Arnhem from 1910 to 1920 and as Governor of Dutch Suriname from 1921 to 1928, and Baroness Elbrig Willemine Henriette van Asbeck (1873–1939).


  • Wegeleben, Germany (Then Prussia)
    Sunday Jun 17, 1900

    Martin Bormann

    Born

    Wegeleben, Germany (Then Prussia)
    Sunday Jun 17, 1900

    Born in Wegeleben (now in Saxony-Anhalt) in the Kingdom of Prussia in the German Empire, Bormann was the son of Theodor Bormann (1862–1903), a post office employee, and his second wife, Antonie Bernhardine Mennong.


  • Stockholm, Sweden
    Friday Jun 29, 1900

    Nobel Prize

    Forming the Nobel Foundation

    Stockholm, Sweden
    Friday Jun 29, 1900

    The executors of the will, Ragnar Sohlman and Rudolf Lilljequist, formed the Nobel Foundation to take care of the fortune and to organise the awarding of prizes.the Nobel Foundation's newly created statutes were promulgated by King Oscar II.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Jul 23, 1900

    W. E. B. Du Bois

    Du Bois attended the First Pan-African Conference

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Jul 23, 1900

    In 1900, Du Bois attended the First Pan-African Conference, held in London from July 23 to 25.


  • China
    Thursday Aug 23, 1900

    Xinhai Revolution

    The Independence Army Uprising

    China
    Thursday Aug 23, 1900

    In 1901, after the Boxer Rebellion started, Tang Caichang and Tan Sitong of the previous Foot Emancipation Society organised the Independence Army. The Independence Army Uprising was planned to occur on 23 August 1900. Their goal was to overthrow Empress Dowager Cixi to establish a constitutional monarchy under the Guangxu Emperor. Their plot was discovered by the governor general of Hunan and Hubei. About twenty conspirators were arrested and executed.


  • South Africa
    Sunday Aug 26, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Broke the last defensive position

    South Africa
    Sunday Aug 26, 1900

    The set-piece period of the war now largely gave way to a mobile guerrilla war, but one final operation remained. President Kruger and what remained of the Transvaal government had retreated to eastern Transvaal. Roberts, joined by troops from Natal under Buller, advanced against them, and broke their last defensive position at Bergendal on 26 August.


  • South Africa
    Monday Sep 3, 1900

    Second Boer War

    Roberts declared the war

    South Africa
    Monday Sep 3, 1900

    Roberts declared the war over on 3 September 1900; and the South African Republic was formally annexed.


  • Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, U.S.
    Wednesday Oct 3, 1900

    The Wright brothers

    First tests

    Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, U.S.
    Wednesday Oct 3, 1900

    The brothers flew the glider for only a few days in the early autumn of 1900 at Kitty Hawk. In the first tests, probably on October 3, Wilbur was aboard while the glider flew as a kite not far above the ground with men below holding tether ropes. Most of the kite tests were unpiloted, with sandbags or chains and even a local boy as ballast.


  • Huizhou, Guangdong, China
    Monday Oct 8, 1900

    Xinhai Revolution

    Sun Yat-sen Ordered The Launch of The Huizhou Uprising

    Huizhou, Guangdong, China
    Monday Oct 8, 1900

    On 8 October 1900, Sun Yat-sen ordered the launch of the Huizhou Uprising. The revolutionary army was led by Zheng Shiliang and initially included 20,000 men, who fought for half a month. However, after the Japanese Prime Minister prohibited Sun Yat-sen from carrying out revolutionary activities on Taiwan, Zheng Shiliang had no choice but to order the army to disperse. This uprising therefore also failed. British soldier Rowland J. Mulkern participated in this uprising.


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