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  • U.S.
    Thursday Jan 2, 1919

    Marcus Garvey

    International League for Darker People

    U.S.
    Thursday Jan 2, 1919

    After the First World War ended, President Woodrow Wilson declared his intention to present a 14-point plan for world peace at the forthcoming Paris Peace Conference. Garvey joined various African-Americans in forming the International League for Darker People, a group which sought to lobby Wilson and the conference to give greater respect to the wishes of people of color; their delegates nevertheless were unable to secure the travel documentation.




  • Sagamore, Massachuesetts, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 5, 1919

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Death

    Sagamore, Massachuesetts, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 5, 1919

    On the night of January 5, 1919, Roosevelt suffered breathing problems. After receiving treatment from his physician, Dr. George W. Faller, he felt better and went to bed. Roosevelt's last words were "Please put out that light, James" to his family servant James Amos. Between 4:00 and 4:15 the next morning, Roosevelt died in his sleep at Sagamore Hill after a blood clot had detached from a vein and traveled to his lungs.




  • San Francisco, California, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 5, 1919

    Spanish Flu

    San Francisco's New Year

    San Francisco, California, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 5, 1919

    In the first five days of January, in San Francisco, 1,800 flu cases and 101 deaths were reported.




  • Paris, France
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    Armenian Genocide

    Paris Peace Conference

    Paris, France
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    During the Paris Peace Conference, the Armenian delegation presented an assessment of $3.7 billion (about $53 billion today) worth of material losses owned solely by the Armenian church.




  • Wood Farm, Sandringham, England, United Kingdom
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    Edward VIII

    Death of the youngest brother

    Wood Farm, Sandringham, England, United Kingdom
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    Edward's youngest brother, Prince John, died at the age of 13 on 18 January 1919 after a severe epileptic seizure. Edward, who was 11 years older than John and had hardly known him, saw his death as "little more than a regrettable nuisance".




  • Paris, France
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    World War II

    Paris Peace Conference

    Paris, France
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    The Paris Peace Conference was the meeting of the Allies after the end of world war I to set the peace terms on the defeated Central Powers. The Conference formally opened on 18 January 1919. Five major peace treaties were prepared in Paris Peace Conference: - Treaty of Versailles (28 June 1919) - Treaty of Saint-Germain (10 September 1919) - Treaty on Neuilly (27 November 1919) - Treaty of Trianon (4 June 1920) - Treaty of Sèvres (10 August 1920), subsequently revised by the Treaty of Lausanne (24 July 1923).




  • Paris, France
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    United Nations

    Paris Peace Conference

    Paris, France
    Saturday Jan 18, 1919

    Two months later, the Allies met with Germany and Austria-Hungary at Versailles to hammer out formal peace terms.


  • Dublin, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    First Dáil

    Dublin, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Sinn Féin won 91% of the seats outside of Ulster on 46.9% of votes cast, but was in a minority in Ulster, where unionists were in a majority. Sinn Féin pledged not to sit in the UK Parliament at Westminster, but rather to set up an Irish Parliament. This parliament, known as the First Dáil, and its ministry, called the Aireacht, consisting only of Sinn Féin members, met at the Mansion House on 21 January 1919.


  • Soloheadbeg, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    Soloheadbeg Ambush

    Soloheadbeg, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    While it was not clear in the beginning of 1919 that the Dáil ever intended to gain independence by military means, and war was not explicitly threatened in Sinn Féin's 1918 manifesto, an incident occurred on 21 January 1919, the same day as the First Dáil convened. The Soloheadbeg Ambush, in County Tipperary, was led by Seán Treacy, Séumas Robinson, Seán Hogan and Dan Breen acting on their own initiative.


  • Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    Breakaway Government

    Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    On 21 January 1919 they formed a breakaway government (Dáil Éireann) and declared Irish independence.


  • Romania
    Wednesday Jan 22, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    The Romanian Army Controlled All The Territory To The Maros River

    Romania
    Wednesday Jan 22, 1919

    By 22 January 1919, the Romanian army controlled all the territory to the Maros River. The 7th and 1st divisions were spread thin, so the 2nd Division was sent to Nagyszeben and the 6th Division to Brassó (Braşov). Two new infantry divisions, the 16th and 18th, were formed from Romanian soldiers previously mobilized in the Austro-Hungarian Army. A unified command of the Romanian army in Transylvania was established.


  • Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Friday Feb 7, 1919

    Desmond Doss: Hacksaw Ridge

    Birth

    Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Friday Feb 7, 1919

    Desmond Doss was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, to William Thomas Doss (1893–1989), a carpenter, and Bertha Edward Doss (née Oliver) (1899–1983), a homemaker and shoe factory worker. His mother raised him as a devout Seventh-day Adventist and instilled Sabbath-keeping, nonviolence, and a vegetarian lifestyle in his upbringing. He grew up in the Fairview Heights area of Lynchburg, Virginia, alongside his older sister Audrey and younger brother Harold.


  • Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Friday Feb 7, 1919

    Desmond Doss

    Born

    Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Friday Feb 7, 1919

    Desmond Doss was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, to William Thomas Doss (1893–1989), a carpenter, and Bertha Edward Doss (née Oliver) (1899–1983), a homemaker and shoe factory worker.


  • Paris, France
    Wednesday Feb 19, 1919

    W. E. B. Du Bois

    Du Bois traveled to Europe to attend the first Pan-African Congress

    Paris, France
    Wednesday Feb 19, 1919

    When the war ended, Du Bois traveled to Europe in 1919 to attend the first Pan-African Congress and to interview African-American soldiers for a planned book on their experiences in World War I.


  • Paris, France
    Friday Feb 28, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    The Paris Peace Conference

    Paris, France
    Friday Feb 28, 1919

    On 28 February 1919, at the Paris Peace Conference, the council of the Allied nations notified Hungary of a new demarcation line to which the Romanian army would advance. This line coincided with railways connecting Szatmárnémeti, Nagyvárad, and Arad. However, the Romanian army was not to enter these cities.


  • Korea
    Saturday Mar 1, 1919

    Korean War

    The Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea

    Korea
    Saturday Mar 1, 1919

    Many Korean nationalists fled the country. The Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea was founded in 1919 in Nationalist China.


  • Hungary
    Wednesday Mar 19, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Hungary Received Notification of The New Demarcation Line

    Hungary
    Wednesday Mar 19, 1919

    On 19 March, Hungary received notification of the new demarcation line and demilitarized zone from French Lieutenant Colonel Fernand Vix (the "Vix note"). The Károlyi government would not accept the terms and this was a trigger for the coup d'état by Béla Kun, who formed the Hungarian Soviet Republic.


  • Hungary (then Kingdom of Hungary)
    Thursday Mar 20, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Releasing Béla Kun

    Hungary (then Kingdom of Hungary)
    Thursday Mar 20, 1919

    The Károlyi government failed to manage both domestic and military issues and lost popular support. On 20 March 1919, Béla Kun, who had been imprisoned in the Markó Street prison, was released.


  • Hungary (then Kingdom of Hungary)
    Friday Mar 21, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    The Successful Communist Coup d'état

    Hungary (then Kingdom of Hungary)
    Friday Mar 21, 1919

    On 21 March, Béla Kun led a successful communist coup d'état. Károlyi was deposed and arrested. Kun formed a social democratic, communist coalition government and proclaimed the Hungarian Soviet Republic. Days later the Communists purged the Social Democrats from the government.


  • Tiraspol, Moldova
    Friday Mar 21, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Occupation of Tiraspol

    Tiraspol, Moldova
    Friday Mar 21, 1919

    On 21 March 1919, Romanian troops of the 39th Regiment occupied Tiraspol.


  • Hungary
    Saturday Mar 22, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Beginning The Retreat of The Hungarian Army behind The demilitarized Zone

    Hungary
    Saturday Mar 22, 1919

    A demilitarized zone was to be created, extending from the new demarcation line to 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) beyond the line. The demilitarized zone represented the extent of Romanian territorial requests on Hungary. The retreat of the Hungarian army behind the western border of the demilitarized zone was to begin on 22 March.


  • Turkey (then Ottoman Empire)
    Wednesday Mar 26, 1919

    Armenian Genocide

    Morphine overdose

    Turkey (then Ottoman Empire)
    Wednesday Mar 26, 1919

    Morphine overdose: During the Trabzon trial series of the Martial court, from the sittings between 26 March and 17 May 1919, the Trabzons Health Services Inspector Dr. Ziya Fuad wrote in a report that Dr. Saib caused the death of children with the injection of morphine. The information was allegedly provided by two physicians (Drs. Ragib and Vehib), both Dr. Saib's colleagues at Trabzons Red Crescent hospital, where those atrocities were said to have been committed.


  • Hungary
    Friday Apr 4, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Sending South African General Jan Smuts To Hungary

    Hungary
    Friday Apr 4, 1919

    On 4 April, South African General Jan Smuts was sent to Hungary. He carried the proposition that the Hungarian communist government under Kun abide by the conditions previously presented to Károlyi in the Vix note. Smuts' mission also represented official recognition of the Kun communist government by the Allied council.


  • Ireland
    Friday Apr 11, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    Ostracism of RIC men was announced

    Ireland
    Friday Apr 11, 1919

    A policy of ostracism of RIC men was announced by the Dáil on 11 April 1919.


  • Jenkins County, Georgia, U.S.
    Sunday Apr 13, 1919

    Red Summer

    Jenkins County, Georgia, riot of 1919

    Jenkins County, Georgia, U.S.
    Sunday Apr 13, 1919

    In rural Georgia, the riot of Jenkins County led to 6 deaths, as well as the destruction of various property by arson, including the Carswell Grove Baptist Church, and 3 black Masonic lodges in Millen, Georgia.


  • Romania
    Tuesday Apr 15, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    The Hungarians Launched a Preemptive Attack.

    Romania
    Tuesday Apr 15, 1919

    When Kun became aware of Romanian preparations for an offensive, he fortified mountain passes in the territory controlled by the Hungarian Army. Then, on the night of 15–16 April, the Hungarians launched a preemptive attack.


  • Romania
    Wednesday Apr 16, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Romania Planned To Take an Offensive Action

    Romania
    Wednesday Apr 16, 1919

    When Kun declined the terms of the Vix note, Romania acted to enforce the new railway demarcation line. Romania planned to take an offensive action on 16 April 1919. The north battalion was to take Nagykároly and Nagyvárad. This would separate the elite Hungarian Székely division from the rest of the Hungarian army. The north battalion would then outflank the Hungarian Army. Simultaneously, the south battalion would advance to Máriaradna and Belényes.


  • Hungary (then Kingdom of Hungary)
    Friday Apr 18, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    The Hungarian Front was broken

    Hungary (then Kingdom of Hungary)
    Friday Apr 18, 1919

    By 18 April, the first elements of the Romanian offensive were completed and the Hungarian front was broken.


  • Carei (Nagykároly), Romania
    Saturday Apr 19, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Romania Took Nagykároly

    Carei (Nagykároly), Romania
    Saturday Apr 19, 1919

    On 19 April, Romanian forces took Nagykároly.


  • Nagyvárad (Oradea), Romania - Nagyszalonta (Salonta), Romania
    Sunday Apr 20, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Romania Took Nagyvárad and Nagyszalonta

    Nagyvárad (Oradea), Romania - Nagyszalonta (Salonta), Romania
    Sunday Apr 20, 1919

    On 20 April they took Nagyvárad (Oradea) and Nagyszalonta (Salonta). Rather than following the instructions of the Vix note, the Romanian army pressed on for the Tisza River, an easily defended natural military obstacle.


  • Debrecen, Hungary
    Wednesday Apr 23, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Romania occupied Debrecen

    Debrecen, Hungary
    Wednesday Apr 23, 1919

    On 23 April, Debrecen was occupied by Romanian forces.


  • Békéscsaba, Hungary
    Saturday Apr 26, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Békéscsaba Fell To Romanian Forces

    Békéscsaba, Hungary
    Saturday Apr 26, 1919

    The Romanian Army began preparations for an assault on Békéscsaba. On 25–26 April, after some heavy fighting, Békéscsaba fell to Romanian forces.


  • Szolnok, Hungary
    Tuesday Apr 29, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Breaking Through The Tisza River defense Lines

    Szolnok, Hungary
    Tuesday Apr 29, 1919

    The Hungarians retreated to Szolnok and from there across the Tisza River. They established two concentric defense lines extending from the Tisza River around Szolnok. Between 29 April and 1 May, the Romanian Army broke through these lines.


  • Paris, France
    Wednesday Apr 30, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    French Foreign Minister Stéphen Pichon Summoned Ion I.C. Brătianu

    Paris, France
    Wednesday Apr 30, 1919

    On 30 April, French Foreign Minister Stéphen Pichon summoned Ion I.C. Brătianu, the Romanian representative to the Paris Peace Conference. Romania was told to cease its advance at the Tisza River and retreat to the first demarcation line imposed by the Allied council. Brătianu promised that Romanian troops would not cross the Tisza River.


  • Tisza River, Hungary
    Thursday May 1, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Romania controled The Entire East bank of The Tisza River

    Tisza River, Hungary
    Thursday May 1, 1919

    On the evening of 1 May the entire east bank of the Tisza River was under the control of the Romanian army.


  • Moldova (Then Bessarabia)
    Thursday May 1, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Romania Was Ordered To Leave Bessarabia

    Moldova (Then Bessarabia)
    Thursday May 1, 1919

    On 1 May, Bolshevik Soviet Russian Foreign Minister Georgy Chicherin issued an ultimatum to the Romanian government. Romania was ordered to leave Bessarabia.


  • Hungary
    Friday May 2, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Hungary Sued For Peace

    Hungary
    Friday May 2, 1919

    On 2 May, Hungary sued for peace via a request delivered by his representative, Lieutenant Colonel Henrik Werth. Kun was prepared to recognize all of Romania's territorial demands; requested the cessation of hostilities; and asked for ongoing control of Hungarian internal affairs.


  • U.S.
    Sunday May 4, 1919

    Anna May Wong

    The Red Lantern

    U.S.
    Sunday May 4, 1919

    Wong was working at Hollywood's Ville de Paris department store when Metro Pictures needed 300 female extras to appear in Alla Nazimova's film The Red Lantern (1919). Without her father's knowledge, a friend of his with movie connections helped her land an uncredited role as an extra carrying a lantern.


  • Carnegie Hall, New York City, New York, U.S.
    Monday May 5, 1919

    Red Summer

    National Conference on Lynching

    Carnegie Hall, New York City, New York, U.S.
    Monday May 5, 1919

    The National Conference on Lynching took place in Carnegie Hall, New York City, May 5–6, 1919. The goal of the conference was to pressure Congress to pass the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill. It was a project of the new NAACP, which in April released a report, Thirty Years of Lynching in the United States, 1889-1918.


  • U.S.
    Tuesday May 6, 1919

    Harry S. Truman

    Honorably Discharged from the Army

    U.S.
    Tuesday May 6, 1919

    Truman was honorably discharged from the Army as a captain on May 6, 1919.


  • Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
    Saturday May 10, 1919

    Red Summer

    Charleston riot of 1919

    Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
    Saturday May 10, 1919

    The Charleston riot resulted in the injury of 5 white and 18 black men, along with the death of 3 others: Isaac Doctor, William Brown, and James Talbot, all black. Following the riot, the city of Charleston, South Carolina imposed martial law. A Naval investigation found that four U.S. sailors and one civilian—all white men—initiated the riot.


  • Moldova (Then Bessarabia)
    Saturday May 10, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    The Bolshevik Soviet Russian Troops' Large Attack On Bessarabia

    Moldova (Then Bessarabia)
    Saturday May 10, 1919

    Under the command of Vladimir Antonov-Ovseyenko, Bolshevik Soviet Russian troops gathered along the Dniester River in preparation for a large attack on Bessarabia on 10 May.


  • Vicksburg, Mississippi, U.S.
    Thursday May 15, 1919

    Red Summer

    Vicksburg riots

    Vicksburg, Mississippi, U.S.
    Thursday May 15, 1919

    In Vicksburg, 1000 white rioters broke Lloyd Clay out of jail, hung him, and burned him in the city center as the crowd watching. The riot spurred by rumors of an attack on a white women.


  • Indonesia
    Monday May 19, 1919

    Disasters with highest death tolls

    Mount Kelud

    Indonesia
    Monday May 19, 1919

    On May 19, 1919, an eruption at Kelud killed an estimated 5,000 people, mostly through hot mudflows (also known as "lahars").


  • Miskolc, Hungary
    Tuesday May 20, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Hungary Attacked Miskolc

    Miskolc, Hungary
    Tuesday May 20, 1919

    With cessation of hostilities, Kun worked to improve his battered international position. On 20 May 1919, a force under Colonel Aurél Stromfeld attacked and routed Czech troops from Miskolc.


  • Milan, Georgia, U.S.
    Sunday May 25, 1919

    Red Summer

    Milan riot

    Milan, Georgia, U.S.
    Sunday May 25, 1919

    At 1:00 AM on the morning of May 24, 1919, two white men, John Dowdy and Levi Evans went into the black section of Milan. They first tried to get into the home of Emma McCollers who had two young daughters. When the family refused to open the door Dowdy fired his gun. This caused the girls to flee to another house, the home of widow Emma Tisber. The two men followed and invaded the Tisber home and attempted to assault two young black girls. When the two girls attempted to hide under the porch, Dowdy and Evans began ripping up the floor to get to them. Washington, a black man, attempted to defend the girls and get the men to leave. Dowdy fired at Washington and after a struggle, Washington, who was 72 years old, shot and killed Dowdy. Washington went uptown and woke up the chief of police, Mr. Stuckey, who sent Washington to the McCrae jail at 2:00 AM May 24, 1919. There he stayed in jail until the 25th, at 12:00 PM, when a crowd of white men, led by a Baptist minister, removed Washington from the jail. To possibly hide their crimes all black residents of Milan were rounded up and ordered out of the town on the night of May 25th. At 2:00 AM on May 26th the lynch mob hung him from a post and shot him repeatedly until his body fell in pieces from the post. White residents rioted in the city, damaging and burning many black homes. They threatened black citizens, lest they dare to speak out about the events in public.


  • Bender (Then Tighina), Moldova
    Tuesday May 27, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    The Action at Tighina

    Bender (Then Tighina), Moldova
    Tuesday May 27, 1919

    Bolshevik Soviet Russian attacks in Bessarabia intensified, peaking on 27–28 May with an action at Tighina.


  • New London, Connecticut, U.S.
    Thursday May 29, 1919

    Red Summer

    New London riot

    New London, Connecticut, U.S.
    Thursday May 29, 1919

    On May 30, 1919, about 20 sailors and soldiers were arrested by police officers, marines, and firemen. The Greeneville Daily Sun reported that the trouble began when "negro sailors" entered the Coast Guard Academy in New London and attacked white sailors. On June 29, 1919, another riot erupted which required the Marines to restore order.


  • Tisza River, Hungary
    Tuesday Jun 3, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Romania was Forced Into Further Retreat

    Tisza River, Hungary
    Tuesday Jun 3, 1919

    On 3 June, Romania was forced into further retreat but extended its line of defence along the Tisza River and reinforced its position with the 8th Division, which had been moving forward from Bukovina since 22 May.


  • Hungary
    Monday Jun 23, 1919

    Hungarian–Romanian War

    Hungary Signed an armistice With Czechoslovakia

    Hungary
    Monday Jun 23, 1919

    On 23 June, Hungary signed an armistice with Czechoslovakia.


  • Ellisville, Mississippi, U.S.
    Thursday Jun 26, 1919

    Red Summer

    John Hartfield was burned

    Ellisville, Mississippi, U.S.
    Thursday Jun 26, 1919

    John Hartfield left his home in Ellisville seeking a better life in East St. Louis. In 1919, he traveled back to Ellisville to visit his white girlfriend, Ruth Meeks, taking a job as a hotel porter in Laurel. When the relationship became known to some white men, they determined to kill Hartfield. They accused Hartfield of raping Meeks, who they claimed was 18, although she was actually in her mid-twenties. Hartfield managed to elude them for a while, but they pursued him for several weeks. Sheriff Allen Boutwell in Laurel raised donations to fund a hunting party with bloodhounds at the request of Sheriff Harbison. He was finally apprehended attempting to board a train on June 24, and was turned over to Sheriff Harbison, who placed him in the charge of a deputy and left town. The deputy immediately released him to a mob. Hartfield had been wounded, so a white doctor, A. J. Carter, treated his wounds to keep him alive long enough to be murdered. At 5:00 PM on June 26, 1919, a large cheering crowd assembled to watch the premeditated murder of John Hartfield.


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