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  • Macon, Georgia, U.S.
    Monday Nov 3, 1919

    Red Summer

    Lynching of Paul Jones

    Macon, Georgia, U.S.
    Monday Nov 3, 1919

    On Sunday, November 2, 1919, Paul Jones allegedly attacked a white woman about 2 miles (3.2 km) outside of Macon. Paul Jones was chased through town until he was cornered in a rail boxcar, there the woman positively identified him. A white mob of 400 people quickly assembled and over the protests of Sheriff James R. Hicks they seized Jones. His body was riddled with bullets, "saturated with coal oil" and lit on fire. He was still alive as the flames consumed his body and the mob watched as he writhed in pain. There were no arrests.




  • Europe
    Tuesday Nov 11, 1919

    World War II

    World War I ended

    Europe
    Tuesday Nov 11, 1919

    World War I ended on 11 November 1919.




  • Magnolia, Columbia County, Arkansas, U.S.
    Tuesday Nov 11, 1919

    Red Summer

    Lynching of Jordan Jameson

    Magnolia, Columbia County, Arkansas, U.S.
    Tuesday Nov 11, 1919

    African-American man, Jordan Jameson was lynched on November 11, 1919, in the town square of Magnolia, Columbia County, Arkansas. A large white mob seized Jameson after he allegedly shot the local sheriff. They tied him to a stake and burned him alive.




  • Wilmington, Delaware , U.S.
    Thursday Nov 13, 1919

    Red Summer

    Wilmington race riot of 1919

    Wilmington, Delaware , U.S.
    Thursday Nov 13, 1919

    After accusing three black men of killing a police man, when the mob found out the brothers were out of their reach they turned their anger on the black community. One mob of 300 whites were rampaging through the black part of town when they encountered 4 black men, the two parties shot at each other and African-American Bannel Fields was wounded with a shot in the head.




  • U.S.
    Monday Nov 17, 1919

    Red Summer

    A. Mitchell Palmer reported to Congress on the threat that anarchists and Bolsheviks posed to the government

    U.S.
    Monday Nov 17, 1919

    On November 17, Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer reported to Congress on the threat that anarchists and Bolsheviks posed to the government. More than half the report documented radicalism in the black community and the "open defiance" black leaders advocated in response to racial violence and the summer's rioting. It faulted the leadership of the black community for an "ill-governed reaction toward race rioting.… In all discussions of the recent racial riots against blacks there is reflected the note of pride that the Negro has found himself. that he has 'fought back,' that never again will he tamely submit to violence and intimidation". It described "the dangerous spirit of defiance and vengeance at work among the Negro leaders".




  • Bogalusa, Louisiana, U.S.
    Saturday Nov 22, 1919

    Red Summer

    Bogalusa saw mill killings

    Bogalusa, Louisiana, U.S.
    Saturday Nov 22, 1919

    The Bogalusa saw mill killings was a racial attack that killed four labor organizers on November 22, 1919. It was mounted by the white paramilitary group the Self-Preservation and Loyalty League (SPLL) in Thibodaux, Louisiana. They were supported by the owners of Great Southern Lumber Company, a giant logging corporation, that hoped to prevent union organization and the Black and White labor organizations from merging.




  • U.S.
    Tuesday Nov 25, 1919

    Red Summer

    A letter from the National Equal Rights League

    U.S.
    Tuesday Nov 25, 1919

    Protests and appeals to the federal government continued for weeks. A letter from the National Equal Rights League, dated November 25, appealed to Wilson's international advocacy for human rights: "We appeal to you to have your country undertake for its racial minority that which you forced Poland and Austria to undertake for their racial minorities."


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