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  • Tokyo, Japan
    Sunday Nov 2, 1941

    Hirohito

    The review of Eleven points

    Tokyo, Japan
    Sunday Nov 2, 1941

    On November 2 Tōjō, Sugiyama, and Nagano reported to the Emperor that the review of eleven points had been in vain. Emperor Hirohito gave his consent to the war and then asked: "Are you going to provide justification for the war?" The decision for war against the United States was presented for approval to Hirohito by General Tōjō, Naval Minister Admiral Shigetarō Shimada, and Japanese Foreign Minister Shigenori Tōgō.




  • Moscow, U.S.S.R.
    Sunday Nov 2, 1941

    World War II

    Battle of Moscow

    Moscow, U.S.S.R.
    Sunday Nov 2, 1941

    A major offensive against Moscow was renewed; after two months of fierce battles in increasingly harsh weather, the German army almost reached the outer suburbs of Moscow, where the exhausted troops were forced to suspend their offensive. The Battle took place between October 1941 and January 1942, the Soviet defensive effort frustrated Hitler's attack on Moscow, resulting ending of Operation Barbarossa.




  • Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Nov 3, 1941

    Hirohito

    Nagano explained the Plan to the Emperor

    Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Nov 3, 1941

    On November 3, Nagano explained in detail the plan of the attack on Pearl Harbor to the Emperor.




  • Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Nov 5, 1941

    Hirohito

    Emperor Hirohito approved The Operations Plan

    Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Nov 5, 1941

    On November 5 Emperor Hirohito approved in imperial conference the operations plan for a war against the Occident and had many meetings with the military and Tōjō until the end of the month.




  • Bletchley Park, England
    Saturday Nov 8, 1941

    The Imitation game: Alan Turing

    Secret Service Report

    Bletchley Park, England
    Saturday Nov 8, 1941

    On 18 November, the chief of the secret service reported that every possible measure was being taken. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park did not know of the Prime Minister's response, but as Milner-Barry recalled, "All that we did notice was that almost from that day the rough ways began miraculously to be made smooth." More than two hundred bombes were in operation by the end of the war.




  • Bletchley, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
    Tuesday Nov 18, 1941

    Alan Turing

    The Governement Response on Turing Message

    Bletchley, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
    Tuesday Nov 18, 1941

    On 18 November, the chief of the secret service reported that every possible measure was being taken. The cryptographers at Bletchley Park did not know of the Prime Minister's response, but as Milner-Barry recalled, "All that we did notice was that almost from that day the rough ways began miraculously to be made smooth." More than two hundred bombes were in operation by the end of the war.




  • Egypt and Libya
    Tuesday Nov 18, 1941

    World War II

    Operation Crusader

    Egypt and Libya
    Tuesday Nov 18, 1941

    By November 1941, Commonwealth forces had launched a counter-offensive, Operation Crusader, in North Africa, and reclaimed all the gains the Germans and Italians had made. The Operation lasted from 18 November to 30 December 1941.


  • Spain
    Tuesday Nov 25, 1941

    Francisco Franco

    Anti-Comintern Pact

    Spain
    Tuesday Nov 25, 1941

    Franco signed a revised Anti-Comintern Pact on 25 November 1941.


  • U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 26, 1941

    World War II

    American counter-proposal

    U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 26, 1941

    The American counter-proposal of 26 November required that Japan evacuate all of China without conditions and conclude non-aggression pacts with all Pacific powers. That meant Japan was essentially forced to choose between abandoning its ambitions in China, or seizing the natural resources it needed in the Dutch East Indies by force; the Japanese military did not consider the former an option, and many officers considered the oil embargo an unspoken declaration of war.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 26, 1941

    Hirohito

    The Hull note

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 26, 1941

    On November 26, 1941, US Secretary of State Cordell Hull presented the Japanese ambassador with the Hull note, which as one of its conditions demanded the complete withdrawal of all Japanese troops from French Indochina and China. Japanese Prime Minister Tojo Hideki said to his cabinet, "This is an ultimatum".


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