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  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    31st Century BC

    In South India the Neolithic began by 3000 BCE

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    31st Century BC

    In South India, the Neolithic began by 3000 BCE and lasted until around 1400 BCE. South Indian Neolithic is characterized by Ashmounds since 2500 BCE in the Andhra-Karnataka region that expanded later into Tamil Nadu.




  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    31st Century BC

    Indian religions

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    31st Century BC

    Indian religions, sometimes also termed Dharmic religions or Indic religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent. These religions, which include Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism, are also classified as Eastern religions.




  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    31st Century BC

    History of Hinduism

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    31st Century BC

    The history of Hinduism covers a wide variety of related religious traditions native to the Indian subcontinent. Its history overlaps or coincides with the development of religion in the Indian subcontinent since the Iron Age.




  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    2600s BC

    The Mature Indus civilization flourished

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    2600s BC

    The Mature Indus civilization flourished from about 2600 to 1900 BCE, marking the beginning of urban civilization on the Indian subcontinent. The civilization included cities such as Harappa, Ganeriwala, and Mohenjo-daro in modern-day Pakistan, and Dholavira, Kalibangan, Rakhigarhi, and Lothal in modern-day India.




  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    27th Century BC

    The civilization was primarily centered in modern-day Pakistan

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    27th Century BC

    The civilization was primarily centered in modern-day Pakistan, in the Indus river basin, and secondarily in the Ghaggar-Hakra river basin in eastern Pakistan and northwestern India. The Mature Indus civilization flourished from about 2600 to 1900 BCE, marking the beginning of urban civilization on the Indian subcontinent.




  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    26th Century BC

    This civilisation flourished

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    26th Century BC

    This civilization flourished between 2500 BCE and 1900 BCE in what today is Pakistan and north-western India and was noted for its urban planning, baked brick houses, elaborate drainage, and water supply.




  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Early Vedic society is described in the Rigveda

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Early Vedic society is described in the Rigveda, the oldest Vedic text, believed to have been compiled during the 2nd millennium BCE, in the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Iron using in the Central Ganga Plain and the Eastern Vindhyas

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Iron using and ironworking were prevalent in the Central Ganga Plain and the Eastern Vindhyas from the early second millennium BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    The oldest Vedic text

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Early Vedic society is described in the Rigveda, the oldest Vedic text, believed to have been compiled during the 2nd millennium BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Indo-Aryan peoples

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Indo-Aryan peoples refer to both the pastoralist Indo-European people migrating from Central Asia into South Asia in the second millennium BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    Ochre Coloured Pottery culture

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    21st Century BC

    During the 2nd millennium BCE, Ochre Coloured Pottery culture was in the Ganga Yamuna Doab region.


  • Indus Valley (Present-Day Northwest India and Eastern Pakistan)
    21st Century BC

    Dought caused the population of the Indus Valley to scatter from large urban centres to villages

    Indus Valley (Present-Day Northwest India and Eastern Pakistan)
    21st Century BC

    In the early second millennium BCE, persistent drought caused the population of the Indus Valley to scatter from large urban centers to villages. Around the same time, Indo-Aryan tribes moved into Punjab from Central Asia in several waves of migration.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Patna, Bihar, India)
    19th Century BC

    Magadha was a location of an advanced Neolithic

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Patna, Bihar, India)
    19th Century BC

    It "was the area of the earliest known cultivation of rice in South Asia and by 1800 BCE was the location of an advanced Neolithic population associated with the sites of Chirand and Chechar". In this region, the Śramaṇic movements flourished, and Jainism and Buddhism originated.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    16th Century BC

    Indo-Aryan migration

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    16th Century BC

    Indo-Aryan population movements into the region from Central Asia are considered to have started after 2000 BCE, as a slow diffusion during the Late Harappan period, which led to a language shift in the northern Indian subcontinent. Around the same time, the Iranian languages were brought into the Iranian plateau by the Iranians, who were closely related to the Indo-Aryans.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    16th Century BC

    Many regions of the Indian subcontinent transitioned from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age in this period

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    16th Century BC

    The Vedic period, lasting from about 1500 to 500 BCE, contributed to the foundations of several cultural aspects of the Indian subcontinent. In terms of culture, many regions of the Indian subcontinent transitioned from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age in this period.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1500 BC

    The Vedic period

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1500 BC

    The Vedic period is the period when the Vedas were composed, the liturgical hymns from the Indo-Aryan people. The Vedic culture was located in the part of northwest India, while other parts of India had a distinct cultural identity during this period. The Vedic culture was located in the part of northwest India, while other parts of India had a distinct cultural identity during this period. The Vedic culture is described in the texts of Vedas, still sacred to Hindus, which were orally composed and transmitted in Vedic Sanskrit. The Vedas are some of the oldest extant texts in India.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1200 BC

    Iron Age in the Indian subcontinent

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1200 BC

    The Iron Age in the Indian subcontinent from about 1200 BCE to the 6th century BCE is defined by the rise of Janapadas, which are realms, republics, and kingdoms—notably the Iron Age Kingdoms of Kuru, Panchala, Kosala, Videha.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    13th Century BC

    The Painted Grey Ware culture (PGW)

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    13th Century BC

    The Painted Grey Ware culture (PGW) is an Iron Age Indian culture of the western Gangetic plain and the Ghaggar-Hakra valley in the Indian subcontinent, conventionally dated c.1200 to 600–500 BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1200 BC

    The Kuru kingdom was the first state-level society of the Vedic period

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1200 BC

    The Kuru kingdom was the first state-level society of the Vedic period, corresponding to the beginning of the Iron Age in northwestern India, around 1200–800 BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    13th Century BC

    The Iron Age in the Indian subcontinent

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    13th Century BC

    The Iron Age in the Indian subcontinent from about 1200 BCE to the 6th century BCE is defined by the rise of Janapadas, which are realms, republics, and kingdoms—notably the Iron Age Kingdoms of Kuru, Panchala, Kosala, Videha.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1100s BC

    The archaeological PGW culture

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    1100s BC

    The archaeological PGW culture, which flourished in the Haryana and western Uttar Pradesh regions of northern India from about 1100 to 600 BCE, is believed to correspond to the Kuru and Panchala kingdoms.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    12th Century BC

    Janapadas

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    12th Century BC

    The Janapadas were the realms, republics, and kingdoms of the Vedic period on the Indian subcontinent.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Hallur, Karnataka, India)
    11th Century BC

    The earliest Iron Age

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Hallur, Karnataka, India)
    11th Century BC

    The earliest Iron Age sites in South India are Hallur, Karnataka, and Adichanallur, Tamil Nadu at around 1000 BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    10th Century BC

    Jainism is a religion founded in ancient India

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    10th Century BC

    Jainism is a religion founded in ancient India. Jains trace their history through twenty-four tirthankara and revere Rishabhanatha as the first tirthankara.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    10th Century BC

    The kingdom of Videha was emerged

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    10th Century BC

    During the Late Vedic Period, the kingdom of Videha emerged as a new center of Vedic culture, situated even farther to the East (in what is today Nepal and Bihar state in India).


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    872 BC

    Parshvanatha

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    872 BC

    Parshvanatha was the 23rd of 24 Tirthankaras of Jainism. He is the only Tirthankara who gained the title of Kalīkālkalpataru. He is one of the earliest Tirthankaras who are acknowledged as historical figures. He was the earliest exponent of Karma philosophy in recorded history. The Jain sources place him between the 9th and 8th centuries BC whereas historians consider that he lived in the 8th or 7th century BC.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    800s BC

    Upanishads

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    800s BC

    Around 800 BCE to 400 BCE witnessed the composition of the earliest Upanishads. Upanishads form the theoretical basis of classical Hinduism and are known as Vedanta (Conclusion of the Vedas).


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    9th Century BC

    Śramaṇa movement

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    9th Century BC

    During the time between 800 and 200 BCE, the Śramaṇa movement formed, from which originated Jainism and Buddhism. In the same period, the first Upanishads were written.


  • Afghanistan and Pakistan
    9th Century BC

    Early history of Sakas

    Afghanistan and Pakistan
    9th Century BC

    The Sakas are attested in historical and archaeological records dating to around the 8th century BC.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    800 BC

    Mahābhārata

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    800 BC

    The Mahābhārata is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    9th Century BC

    The Śramaṇa movement formed "Śramaṇa"

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    9th Century BC

    During the time between 800 and 200 BCE, the Śramaṇa movement formed, from which originated Jainism and Buddhism.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    8th Century BC

    Increasing urbanisation of India

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    8th Century BC

    The increasing urbanization of India in the 7th and 6th centuries BCE led to the rise of new ascetic or Śramaṇa movements which challenged the orthodoxy of rituals.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    700s BC

    Iron Age in India

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    700s BC

    In the prehistory of the Indian subcontinent, an "Iron Age" is recognized as succeeding the Late Harappan culture.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    8th Century BC

    Tripartite struggle centred on Kannauj

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    8th Century BC

    The most significant event between the 7th and 11th centuries was the Tripartite struggle centered on Kannauj that lasted for more than two centuries between the Pala Empire, Rashtrakuta Empire, and Gurjara-Pratihara Empire.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Gautama Buddha

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Gautama Buddha, popularly known as the Buddha, was an ascetic, a religious leader, and a teacher who lived in ancient India (c. 6th to 5th century BCE or c. 5th to 4th century BCE).


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Magadha being ruled by the Haryanka dynasty

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Early sources, from the Buddhist Pāli Canon, the Jain Agamas, and the Hindu Puranas, mention Magadha being ruled by the Haryanka dynasty for some 200 years, c. 600–413 BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Rising of urbanism in India after the Indus Valley Civilisation

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    These Mahajanapadas evolved and flourished in a belt stretching from Gandhara in the northwest to Bengal in the eastern part of the Indian subcontinent and included parts of the trans-Vindhyan region. This period saw the second major rise of urbanism in India after the Indus Valley Civilisation.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    600 BC

    Rising of the Mahajanapadas

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    600 BC

    The period from c. 600 BCE to c. 300 BCE witnessed the rise of the Mahajanapadas, sixteen powerful and vast kingdoms, and oligarchic republics.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Achaemenid conquest of the Indus Valley

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    The Achaemenid conquest of the Indus Valley refers to the Achaemenid military conquest and governance of the territories of the North-western regions of the Indian subcontinent, from the 6th to 4th centuries BC.


  • Tamilakam (Present-Day Southern India)
    600 BC

    Sangam period

    Tamilakam (Present-Day Southern India)
    600 BC

    The Sangam period is the period of the history of ancient Tamil Nadu, Kerala, and parts of Sri Lanka (then known as Tamilakam) spanning from c. 6th century BCE to c. 3rd century CE.


  • Afghanistan and Pakistan
    7th Century BC

    The Macedonian king Alexander launched a campaign in present-day Afghanistan and Pakistan

    Afghanistan and Pakistan
    7th Century BC

    After conquering the Achaemenid Empire of Persia, the Macedonian king Alexander launched a campaign in present-day Afghanistan and Pakistan, part of which formed the easternmost territories of the Achaemenid Empire following the Achaemenid conquest of the Indus Valley (late 6th century BC).


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    7th Century BC

    Magadha being ruled by the Haryanka dynasty

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    7th Century BC

    Early sources, from the Buddhist Pāli Canon, the Jain Agamas, and the Hindu Puranas, mention Magadha being ruled by the Haryanka dynasty for some 200 years, c. 600–413 BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    7th Century BC

    Magadha formed one of an kingdoms in ancient India

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    7th Century BC

    Magadha formed one of the sixteen Mahā-Janapadas or kingdoms in ancient India. The core of the kingdom was the area of Bihar south of the Ganges; its first capital was Rajagriha (modern Rajgir) then Pataliputra (modern Patna).


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Early "republics" or Gaṇa sangha

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Early "republics" or Gaṇa sangha, such as Shakyas, Koliyas, Mallas, and Licchavis had republican governments. Gaṇa sanghas, such as Mallas, centered in the city of Kusinagara, and the Vajjian Confederacy, centered in the city of Vaishali, existed as early as the 6th century BCE and persisted in some areas until the 4th century CE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Magadha

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Magadha was a region and one of the sixteen Mahajanapadas, 'Great Kingdoms' of the Second Urbanization in what is now south Bihar at the eastern Ganges Plain.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    Mahājanapadas

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    The Mahājanapadas were sixteen kingdoms or oligarchic republics that existed in Northern ancient India from the sixth to fourth centuries BCE during the second urbanization period.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    History of Buddhism

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    The history of Buddhism spans from the 6th century BCE to the present. Buddhism arose in Ancient India, in and around the ancient Kingdom of Magadha, and is based on the teachings of the ascetic Siddhārtha Gautama.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    The pastoral and nomadic Indo-Aryans spread from the Punjab into the Gangetic plain

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    7th Century BC

    The pastoral and nomadic Indo-Aryans spread from Punjab into the Gangetic plain, large swaths of which they deforested for agriculture usage. The composition of Vedic texts ended around 600 BCE when a new, interregional culture arose.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Vaishali, Bihar, India)
    599 BC

    Mahavira

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Vaishali, Bihar, India)
    599 BC

    Mahavira, also known as Vardhamana, was the 24th Tirthankara of Jainism. He was the spiritual successor of the 23rd Tirthankara Parshvanatha. Mahavira was born in the early part of the 6th century BCE into a royal Jain family in Bihar, India. His mother's name was Trishala and his father's name was Siddhartha.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    580s BC

    Gautama Buddha was founder of Buddhism

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    580s BC

    Mahavira was a proponent of Jainism, and Gautama Buddha was the founder of Buddhism, were the most prominent icons of this movement. Śramaṇa gave rise to the concept of the cycle of birth and death, the concept of samsara, and the concept of liberation.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    554 BC

    Bimbisāra was a King of Magadha

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    554 BC

    Bimbisāra was a King of Magadha and belonged to the Haryanka dynasty. he was the son of Bhattiya. His expansion of the kingdom, especially his annexation of the kingdom of Anga to the east, is considered to have laid the foundations for the later expansion of the Mauryan Empire.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    544 BC

    Haryanka dynasty

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    544 BC

    The Haryanka dynasty was the third ruling dynasty of Magadha, an empire of ancient India, which succeeded the Pradyota dynasty and Barhadratha dynasty. Initially, the capital was Rajagriha.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    535 BC

    The First invasion of Achaemenid to the Indus Valley

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    535 BC

    The conquest occurred in two phases. The first invasion was conducted around 535 BCE by Cyrus the Great, who founded the Achaemenid Empire.


  • Armenia
    515 BC

    The Saka

    Armenia
    515 BC

    The Saka were regarded by the Babylonians as synonymous with the Gimirrai; both names are used on the trilingual Behistun Inscription, carved in 515 BCE on the order of Darius the Great, These people were reported to be mainly interested in settling in the kingdom of Urartu, later part of Armenia, and Shacusen in Utik derived its name from them.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    515 BC

    The Achaemenid conquest of the Indus Valley

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    515 BC

    During the Achaemenid conquest of the Indus Valley circa 515 BCE, the Achaemenid army was not uniquely Persian, and the Sakas probably participated in the invasion of northwestern India.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    500s BC

    Second urbanization

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    500s BC

    After 500 BCE, the so-called "second urbanization" started, with new urban settlements arising at the Ganges plain, especially the Central Ganges plain. The foundations for the "second urbanization" were laid prior to 600 BCE, in the Painted Grey Ware culture of the Ghaggar-Hakra and Upper Ganges Plain.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    500 BC

    Sources of ancient Tamil history

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    500 BC

    There are literary, archaeological, epigraphic and numismatic sources of ancient Tamil history. The foremost among these sources is the Sangam literature, generally dated to 5th century BCE to 3rd century CE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    500 BC

    New urban settlements arising at the Ganges plain

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    500 BC

    After 500 BCE, the so-called "second urbanization" started, with new urban settlements arising at the Ganges plain, especially the Central Ganges plain.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    420s BC

    Shaishunaga dynasty

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Rajgir, Bihar, India)
    420s BC

    The Shaishunaga dynasty is believed to have been the second ruling dynasty of Magadha, an empire of ancient India. According to the Hindu Puranas, this dynasty was the second ruling dynasty of Magadha, succeeding Nagadashaka of the Haryanka dynasty.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    5th Century BC

    Mahapadma

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    5th Century BC

    The Puranas name the dynasty's founder as Mahapadma, and claim that he was the son of the Shaishunaga king Mahanandin. However, even these texts hint at the low birth of the Nandas, when they state that Mahapadma's mother belonged to the Shudra class, the lowest of the varnas.


  • Pataliputra (Present-Day Patna, India)
    5th Century BC

    Nanda Empire

    Pataliputra (Present-Day Patna, India)
    5th Century BC

    The Nanda Empire, at its greatest extent, extended from Bengal in the east, to the Punjab region in the west and as far south as the Vindhya Range. The Nanda dynasty was famed for its great wealth. The Nanda dynasty ruled in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent during the 4th century BCE, and possibly during the 5th century BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    5th Century BC

    Most of the Indian subcontinent

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    5th Century BC

    Most of the Indian subcontinent was conquered by the Maurya Empire during the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    395 BC

    Indo-Scythian rule in the northwestern Indian subcontinent ceased

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    395 BC

    The indo-Scythian rule in the northwestern Indian subcontinent ceased when the last Western Satrap Rudrasimha III was defeated by the Gupta emperor Chandragupta II in 395 CE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    345 BC

    The last Shishunaga ruler was assassinated

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    345 BC

    The last Shishunaga ruler, Kalasoka, was assassinated by Mahapadma Nanda in 345 BCE, the first of the so-called Nine Nandas, which were Mahapadma and his eight sons.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day North India)
    340s BC

    Nanda dynasty

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day North India)
    340s BC

    The Nanda dynasty ruled in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent during the 4th century BCE, and possibly during the 5th century BCE.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    329 BC

    Dhana Nanda was the last ruler of the Nanda dynasty

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    329 BC

    Dhana Nanda was the last ruler of the Nanda dynasty of ancient India. He was the youngest of the eight brothers of the dynasty's founder Ugrasena (also known as Mahapadma Nanda).


  • Pataliputra (Present-Day Patna, India)
    320s BC

    Alexander attacked Nanda Empire of Magadha

    Pataliputra (Present-Day Patna, India)
    320s BC

    Alexander's march east put him in confrontation with the Nanda Empire of Magadha. According to Greek sources, the Nanda army was supposedly five times larger than the Macedonian army.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    327 BC

    Indian campaign of Alexander the Great

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    327 BC

    The Indos campaign of Alexander the Great began in 327 BC.


  • Jhelum, Punjab, Pakistan
    326 BC

    Battle of the Hydaspes River

    Jhelum, Punjab, Pakistan
    326 BC

    The Battle of the Hydaspes was fought between Alexander the Great and King Porus. The Battle of the Hydaspes River was fought by Alexander in July 326 BC against King Porus on the Hydaspes River in Punjab, near Bhera. The Hydaspes was the last major battle fought by Alexander.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    322 BC

    Maurya Empire established by Chandragupta Maurya

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    322 BC

    The empire was established by Chandragupta Maurya assisted by Chanakya (Kautilya) in Magadha (in modern Bihar) when he overthrew the Nanda dynasty.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Patna, Bihar, India)
    322 BC

    Maurya Empire

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day Patna, Bihar, India)
    322 BC

    The Maurya Empire unified most of the Indian subcontinent into one state and was the largest empire ever to exist on the Indian subcontinent.


  • Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    4th Century

    Nandas built on the successes of their Haryanka and Shaishunaga

    Indian subcontinent (Present-Day India)
    4th Century

    The Nandas built on the successes of their Haryanka and Shaishunaga predecessors and instituted a more centralized administration. Ancient sources credit them with amassing great wealth, which was probably a result of the introduction of a new currency and taxation system.


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