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  • United kingdom
    1874

    Sir William Roberts noted That Cultures of The Mold Penicillium Glaucum Did Not Display Bacterial Contamination

    United kingdom
    1874

    In 1874, physician Sir William Roberts noted that cultures of the mold Penicillium glaucum that is used in the making of some types of blue cheese did not display bacterial contamination.




  • Germany
    1877

    Antibiosis was First Described

    Germany
    1877

    Antibiosis was first described in 1877 in bacteria when Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch observed that an airborne bacillus could inhibit the growth of Bacillus anthracis.




  • Germany
    1880s

    The Beginning Development of Antibacterials

    Germany
    1880s

    Synthetic antibiotic chemotherapy as a science and development of antibacterials began in Germany with Paul Ehrlich in the late 1880s.




  • Italy
    1895

    Vincenzo Published a Paper on The Antibacterial Power of Some Extracts of Mold

    Italy
    1895

    In 1895 Vincenzo Tiberio, Italian physician, published a paper on the antibacterial power of some extracts of mold.




  • France
    1897

    The First Known Scholarly work to consider the Therapeutic capabilities of Molds resulting from their Anti-Microbial activity

    France
    1897

    In 1897, doctoral student Ernest Duchesne submitted a dissertation, "Contribution à l'étude de la concurrence vitale chez les micro-organismes: antagonisme entre les moisissures et les microbes" (Contribution to the study of vital competition in micro-organisms: antagonism between molds and microbes), the first known scholarly work to consider the therapeutic capabilities of molds resulting from their anti-microbial activity.




  • Germany
    1907

    The First Synthetic Antibacterial Organoarsenic Compound Salvarsan

    Germany
    1907

    Ehrlich noted certain dyes would color human, animal, or bacterial cells, whereas others did not. He then proposed the idea that it might be possible to create chemicals that would act as a selective drug that would bind to and kill bacteria without harming the human host. After screening hundreds of dyes against various organisms, in 1907, he discovered a medicinally useful drug, the first synthetic antibacterial organoarsenic compound salvarsan, now called arsphenamine.




  • Stockholm, Sweden
    Thursday Dec 10, 1908

    Ehrlich Received The Nobel Prize

    Stockholm, Sweden
    Thursday Dec 10, 1908

    In 1908, Ehrlich received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his contributions to immunology.


  • Höchst, Frankfurt, Germany
    1910

    The Hoechst Company began To Market The Salvarsan Compound

    Höchst, Frankfurt, Germany
    1910

    The Hoechst company began to market the compound toward the end of 1910 under the name Salvarsan, now known as arsphenamine. The drug was used to treat syphilis in the first half of the 20th century.


  • Wiesbaden, Germany
    Tuesday Apr 19, 1910

    Ehrlich and Hata announced Their Discovery

    Wiesbaden, Germany
    Tuesday Apr 19, 1910

    In 1910 Ehrlich and Hata announced their discovery, which they called drug "606", at the Congress for Internal Medicine at Wiesbaden.


  • Stockholm, Sweden
    Sunday Dec 10, 1911

    Hata was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Stockholm, Sweden
    Sunday Dec 10, 1911

    Hata was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1911 and for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1912 and 1913.


  • United Kingdom
    1928

    Sir Alexander Fleming Postulated The Existence of Penicillin

    United Kingdom
    1928

    In 1928, Sir Alexander Fleming postulated the existence of penicillin, a molecule produced by certain molds that kills or stops the growth of certain kinds of bacteria.


  • Germany
    1932

    The First Sulfonamide and The First Systemically Active Antibacterial Drug Was Developed

    Germany
    1932

    The first sulfonamide and the first systemically active antibacterial drug, Prontosil, was developed by a research team led by Gerhard Domagk in 1932 or 1933 at the Bayer Laboratories of the IG Farben conglomerate in Germany,


  • U.S.
    1939

    The Discovery of The First Naturally Derived Antibiotic

    U.S.
    1939

    In 1939, coinciding with the start of World War II, Dubos had reported the discovery of the first naturally derived antibiotic, tyrothricin, a compound of 20% gramicidin and 80% tyrocidine, from B. brevis. It was one of the first commercially manufactured antibiotics and was very effective in treating wounds and ulcers during World War II.


  • Stockholm, Sweden
    1939

    Domagk Received The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Stockholm, Sweden
    1939

    Domagk received the 1939 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for Developing Prontosil


  • United Kingdom
    1942

    The penicillin G

    United Kingdom
    1942

    Ernst Chain, Howard Florey and Edward Abraham succeeded in purifying the first penicillin, penicillin G, in 1942, but it did not become widely available outside the Allied military before 1945.


  • United Kingdom
    1942

    The Chemical Structure of Penicillin was First Proposed

    United Kingdom
    1942

    The chemical structure of penicillin was first proposed by Abraham in 1942 and then later confirmed by Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin in 1945.


  • U.S.
    1942

    The Term Antibiotic was First Used

    U.S.
    1942

    The term antibiotic was first used in 1942 by Selman Waksman and his collaborators in journal articles to describe any substance produced by a microorganism that is antagonistic to the growth of other microorganisms in high dilution.


  • Stockholm, Sweden
    Dec, 1945

    Chain and Florey shared the 1945 Nobel Prize in Medicine with Fleming

    Stockholm, Sweden
    Dec, 1945

    For their successful development of penicillin, which Fleming had accidentally discovered but could not develop himself, as a therapeutic drug, Chain and Florey shared the 1945 Nobel Prize in Medicine with Fleming.


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