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  • Aztec (now: Veracruz, Mexico)
    1750 BC

    Science confirmed historic Existence

    Aztec (now: Veracruz, Mexico)
    1750 BC

    Ceramic vessel with residues from the preparation of chocolate beverages has been found at archaeological sites dating back to the Early Formative (1900–900 BC) period. For example, one such vessel found at an Olmec archaeological site on the Gulf Coast of Veracruz, Mexico dates chocolate's preparation by pre-Olmec peoples as early as 1750 BC.




  • Aztec (Present-Day Mexico)
    14th Century BC

    Early Existence

    Aztec (Present-Day Mexico)
    14th Century BC

    Evidence suggests that it may have been fermented and served as an alcoholic beverage as early as 1400 BC.




  • Spain
    Friday Aug 15, 1502

    Christopher Columbus with the Cacao

    Spain
    Friday Aug 15, 1502

    Christopher Columbus encountered the cacao bean on his fourth mission to the Americas on August 15, 1502, when he and his crew seized a large native canoe that proved to contain among other goods for trade, cacao beans. His son Ferdinand commented that the natives greatly valued the beans, which he termed almonds, "for when they were brought on board ship together with their goods, I observed that when any of these almonds fell, they all stooped to pick it up, as if an eye had fallen."




  • Spain
    1519

    Cortés and Díaz

    Spain
    1519

    Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés may have been the first European to encounter chocolate when he observed it in the court of Montezuma in 1519. In 1568, Bernal Díaz, who accompanied Cortés in the conquest of Mexico.




  • England, France and Netherlands
    2nd Millenium

    The expansion of the cacao beans Pantation

    England, France and Netherlands
    2nd Millenium

    The new craze for chocolate brought with it a thriving slave market, as between the early 17th and late 19th centuries the laborious and slow processing of the cacao bean was manual. Cacao plantations spread, as the English, Dutch, and French colonized and planted. With the depletion of Mesoamerican workers, largely to disease, cocoa beans production was often the work of poor wage laborers and African slaves.




  • Bristol, United Kingdom
    1729

    The first mechanic cocoa Grinder

    Bristol, United Kingdom
    1729

    1729 - The first mechanic cocoa grinder was invented in Bristol, UK. Walter Churchman petitions king of England for patent and sole use of an invention for the “expeditious, fine and clean making of chocolate by an engine.” The patent was granted by His Majesty King George II to Walter Churchman for a water engine used to make chocolate. Churchman probably used water-powered edge runners for preparing cacao beans by crushing on a far larger scale than previously. The patent for a chocolate refining process was later bought by J. S. Fry & Sons in 1761.




  • France
    1760

    The Chocolate Lombart

    France
    1760

    Wind-powered and horse-drawn mills were used to speed production, augmenting human labor. Heating the working areas of the table-mill, an innovation that emerged in France in 1732, also assisted in extraction. The Chocolaterie Lombart, created in 1760, claimed to be the first chocolate company in France, ten years before Pelletier et Pelletier.


  • Netherlands
    1815

    Using Alkaline Salts

    Netherlands
    1815

    New processes that speed the production of chocolate emerged early in the Industrial Revolution. In 1815, Dutch chemist Coenraad van Houten introduced alkaline salts to chocolate, which reduced its bitterness.


  • Netherlands
    1828

    Coenraad van Houten

    Netherlands
    1828

    In 1828, Coenraad van Houten created a press to remove about half the natural fat (cacao butter) from chocolate liquor, which made chocolate both cheaper to produce and more consistent in quality. This innovation introduced the modern era of chocolate.


  • Zurich, Switzerland
    1845

    Lindt & Sprüngli AG

    Zurich, Switzerland
    1845

    Lindt & Sprüngli AG, a Swiss-based concern with global reach, had its start in 1845 as the Sprüngli family confectionery shop in Zurich that added a solid-chocolate factory the same year the process for making solid chocolate was developed and later bought Lindt's factory. Besides Nestlé, several chocolate companies had their start in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.


  • Netherlands
    1847

    Dutch Cocoa

    Netherlands
    1847

    Known as "Dutch cocoa", this machine-pressed chocolate was instrumental in the transformation of chocolate to its solid form when in 1847 Joseph Fry learned to make chocolate moldable by adding back melted cacao butter.


  • England, United Kingdom
    1868

    Cadbury

    England, United Kingdom
    1868

    Cadbury was manufacturing boxed chocolates in England by 1868.


  • Switzerland
    1875

    Milk Chocolate

    Switzerland
    1875

    Milk had sometimes been used as an addition to chocolate beverages since the mid-17th century, but in 1875 Daniel Peter invented milk chocolate by mixing powdered milk developed by Henri Nestlé with the liquor.


  • Switzerland
    1879

    Conching Machine

    Switzerland
    1879

    In 1879, the texture and taste of chocolate were further improved when Rodolphe Lindt invented the conching machine.


  • Chicago, U.S.
    1893

    Milton S. Hershey

    Chicago, U.S.
    1893

    In 1893, Milton S. Hershey purchased chocolate processing equipment at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago and soon began the career of Hershey's chocolates with chocolate-coated caramels.


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