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  • Wapakoneta, Ohio, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 05, 1930

    Birth

    Wapakoneta, Ohio, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 05, 1930

    Armstrong was born on August 5, 1930, near Wapakoneta, Ohio.




  • Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, U.S.
    1947

    Education

    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, U.S.
    1947

    In 1947, at age 17, Armstrong began studying aeronautical engineering at Purdue University.




  • Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Jan 26, 1949

    Armstrong's Call-Up From The Navy arrived

    Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Jan 26, 1949

    Armstrong's call-up from the Navy arrived on January 26, 1949, requiring him to report to Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida for flight training with class 5-49.




  • Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Thursday Feb 24, 1949

    He became a Midshipman

    Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Thursday Feb 24, 1949

    After passing the medical examinations, he became a midshipman on February 24, 1949.




  • Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Friday Sep 09, 1949

    Armstrong soloed in SNJ

    Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Friday Sep 09, 1949

    Flight training was conducted in a North American SNJ trainer, in which he soloed on September 9, 1949.




  • Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Thursday Mar 02, 1950

    The First Aircraft Carrier Landing On The USS Cabot

    Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Thursday Mar 02, 1950

    On March 2, 1950, he made his first aircraft carrier landing on the USS Cabot, an achievement he considered comparable to his first solo flight.




  • Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 16, 1950

    Armstrong became a Fully qualified Naval Aviator

    Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 16, 1950

    On August 16, 1950, Armstrong was informed by letter that he was a fully qualified naval aviator.


  • Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 23, 1950

    Graduation

    Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 23, 1950

    His mother and sister attended his graduation ceremony on August 23, 1950.


  • U.S.
    Monday Nov 27, 1950

    He was assigned To VF-51

    U.S.
    Monday Nov 27, 1950

    On November 27, 1950, he was assigned to VF-51, an all-jet squadron, becoming its youngest officer.


  • U.S.
    Friday Jan 05, 1951

    His First Flight In a Jet

    U.S.
    Friday Jan 05, 1951

    Made his first flight in a jet, a Grumman F9F Panther, on January 5, 1951.


  • U.S.
    Tuesday Jun 05, 1951

    He Was Promoted To Ensign

    U.S.
    Tuesday Jun 05, 1951

    He was promoted to ensign on June 5, 1951, and made his first jet carrier landing on USS Essex two days later.


  • Kapolei, Hawaii, U.S.
    Thursday Jun 28, 1951

    VF-51 Flew ahead To Naval Air Station Barbers Point in Hawaii

    Kapolei, Hawaii, U.S.
    Thursday Jun 28, 1951

    On June 28, 1951, Essex had set sail for Korea, with VF-51 aboard to act as ground-attack aircraft. VF-51 flew ahead to Naval Air Station Barbers Point in Hawaii, where it conducted fighter-bomber training before rejoining the ship at the end of July.


  • Kimchaek, North Hamgyong, North Korea
    Wednesday Aug 29, 1951

    An escort For a Photo Reconnaissance Plane in The Korean War

    Kimchaek, North Hamgyong, North Korea
    Wednesday Aug 29, 1951

    On August 29, 1951, Armstrong saw action in the Korean War as an escort for a photo reconnaissance plane over Songjin.


  • Wonsan, Kangwon, North Korea
    Monday Sep 03, 1951

    He Flew Armed Reconnaissance over The Primary Transportation and Storage Facilities

    Wonsan, Kangwon, North Korea
    Monday Sep 03, 1951

    Five days later, on September 3, he flew armed reconnaissance over the primary transportation and storage facilities south of the village of Majon-ni, west of Wonsan. An initial report to the commanding officer of Essex said that while attacking a target, Armstrong's F9F Panther was hit by anti-aircraft fire. The report indicated he was trying to regain control and collided with a pole, which sliced off 2 feet (1 m) of the Panther's right wing. Further perversions of the story by different authors added that he was only 20 feet (6 m) from the ground and that 3 feet (1 m) of his wing was sheared off.


  • North Korea
    Monday Feb 25, 1952

    Armstrong's regular Commission Was Terminated

    North Korea
    Monday Feb 25, 1952

    Armstrong's regular commission was terminated on February 25, 1952, and he became an ensign in the United States Navy Reserve. On completion of his combat tour with Essex, he was assigned to a transport squadron, VR-32, in May 1952.


  • U.S.
    Saturday Aug 23, 1952

    He was released From active Duty

    U.S.
    Saturday Aug 23, 1952

    He was released from active duty on August 23, 1952, but remained in the reserves.


  • U.S.
    Saturday May 09, 1953

    Promotion

    U.S.
    Saturday May 09, 1953

    He was promoted to lieutenant (junior grade) on May 9, 1953.


  • Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, U.S.
    Jan, 1955

    College Graduation

    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, U.S.
    Jan, 1955

    Armstrong graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering in January 1955.


  • Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
    Tuesday Mar 01, 1955

    Armstrong made His First Test Flight

    Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
    Tuesday Mar 01, 1955

    Following his graduation from Purdue, Armstrong became an experimental research test pilot. He applied at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) High-Speed Flight Station at Edwards Air Force Base. NACA had no open positions, and forwarded his application to the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland, where Armstrong made his first test flight on March 1, 1955.


  • Edwards Air Force Base, California, U.S.
    Monday Jul 11, 1955

    He reported for work at High-Speed Flight Station

    Edwards Air Force Base, California, U.S.
    Monday Jul 11, 1955

    Armstrong's stint at Cleveland lasted only a couple of months before a position at the High-Speed Flight Station became available, and he reported for work there on July 11, 1955.


  • Wilmette, Illinois, U.S.
    Saturday Jan 28, 1956

    1st Marriage

    Wilmette, Illinois, U.S.
    Saturday Jan 28, 1956

    Armstrong met Janet Elizabeth Shearon, who was majoring in home economics, at a party hosted by Alpha Chi Omega. According to the couple, there was no real courtship, and neither could remember the exact circumstances of their engagement. They were married on January 28, 1956, at the Congregational Church in Wilmette, Illinois.


  • Edwards Air Force Base, California, U.S.
    Thursday Mar 22, 1956

    His First Flight Incident

    Edwards Air Force Base, California, U.S.
    Thursday Mar 22, 1956

    On March 22, 1956, he was in a Boeing B-29 Superfortress, which was to air-drop a Douglas D-558-2 Skyrocket. He sat in the right-hand pilot seat while the left-hand seat commander, Stan Butchart, flew the B-29. As they climbed to 30,000 feet (9 km), the number-four engine stopped and the propeller began windmilling (rotating freely) in the airstream. Hitting the switch that would stop the propeller's spinning, Butchart found it slowed but then started spinning again, this time even faster than the others; if it spun too fast, it would break apart. Their aircraft needed to hold an airspeed of 210 mph (338 km/h) to launch its Skyrocket payload, and the B-29 could not land with the Skyrocket attached to its belly. Armstrong and Butchart brought the aircraft into a nose-down attitude to increase speed, then launched the Skyrocket. At the instant of launch, the number-four engine propeller disintegrated. Pieces of it damaged the number-three engine and hit the number-two engine. Butchart and Armstrong were forced to shut down the damaged number-three engine, along with the number-one engine, due to the torque it created. They made a slow, circling descent from 30,000 ft (9 km) using only the number-two engine, and landed safely.


  • Edwards Air Force Base, California, U.S.
    Thursday Aug 15, 1957

    His First Flight In a Rocket-Powered Aircraft

    Edwards Air Force Base, California, U.S.
    Thursday Aug 15, 1957

    His first flight in a rocket-powered aircraft was on August 15, 1957, in the Bell X-1B, to an altitude of 11.4 miles (18.3 km). On landing, the poorly designed nose landing gear failed, as had happened on about a dozen previous flights of the Bell X-1B.


  • Arlington, Virginia, U.S.
    Friday Aug 01, 1958

    The ARPA Canceled Its Funding To "Man In Space Soonest"

    Arlington, Virginia, U.S.
    Friday Aug 01, 1958

    In June 1958, Armstrong was selected for the U.S. Air Force's Man In Space Soonest program, but the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) canceled its funding on August 1, 1958.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Oct 01, 1958

    He became an Employee of NASA

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Oct 01, 1958

    He became an employee of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) when it was established on October 1, 1958, absorbing NACA.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 05, 1958

    Project "Mercury"

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 05, 1958

    and on November 5, 1958, "Man In Space Soonest" was superseded by Project "Mercury", a civilian project run by NASA.


  • California, U.S.
    Friday Oct 21, 1960

    Resigning His Commission

    California, U.S.
    Friday Oct 21, 1960

    As a reservist, he continued to fly, with VF-724 at Naval Air Station Glenview in Illinois, and then, after moving to California, with VF-773 at Naval Air Station Los Alamitos. He remained in the reserve for eight years, before resigning his commission on October 21, 1960.


  • Antelope Valley, Lancaster, California, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 28, 1962

    His Daughter's Death

    Antelope Valley, Lancaster, California, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 28, 1962

    In June 1961, Karen was diagnosed with a malignant tumor of the middle part of her brain stem; X-ray treatment slowed its growth, but her health deteriorated to the point where she could no longer walk or talk. She died of pneumonia, related to her weakened health, on January 28, 1962, aged two.


  • U.S.
    Thursday Mar 15, 1962

    He Was Selected as One of Seven Pilot-Engineers Who Would Fly The X-20

    U.S.
    Thursday Mar 15, 1962

    on March 15, 1962, he was selected by the U.S. Air Force as one of seven pilot-engineers who would fly the X-20 when it got off the design board.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Apr, 1962

    NASA announcement

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Apr, 1962

    In April 1962, NASA announced that applications were being sought for the second group of NASA astronauts for Project Gemini, a proposed two-man spacecraft. This time, selection was open to qualified civilian test pilots.


  • Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, U.S.
    Monday May 21, 1962

    Armstrong Was Involved In The "Nellis Affair"

    Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, U.S.
    Monday May 21, 1962

    On May 21, 1962, Armstrong was involved in the "Nellis Affair". He was sent in an F-104 to inspect Delamar Dry Lake in southern Nevada, again for emergency landings. He misjudged his altitude, and did not realize that the landing gear had not fully extended. As he touched down, the landing gear began to retract; Armstrong applied full power to abort the landing, but the ventral fin and landing gear door struck the ground, damaging the radio and releasing hydraulic fluid. Without radio communication, Armstrong flew south to Nellis Air Force Base, past the control tower, and waggled his wings, the signal for a no-radio approach. The loss of hydraulic fluid caused the tailhook to release, and upon landing, he caught the arresting wire attached to an anchor chain, and dragged the chain along the runway.


  • San Antonio, Texas, U.S.
    Jun, 1962

    The NACA Medical Exam

    San Antonio, Texas, U.S.
    Jun, 1962

    At Brooks Air Force Base at the end of June, Armstrong underwent a medical exam that many of the applicants described as painful and at times seemingly pointless.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Jun 04, 1962

    Armstrong applied To become an Astronaut

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Jun 04, 1962

    Armstrong visited the Seattle World's Fair in May 1962, and attended a conference there on space exploration that was co-sponsored by NASA. After he returned from Seattle on June 4, he applied to become an astronaut.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Thursday Sep 13, 1962

    Joining The NASA Astronaut Corps as part of "The New Nine"

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Thursday Sep 13, 1962

    NASA's Director of Flight Crew Operations, Deke Slayton, called Armstrong on September 13, 1962, and asked whether he would be interested in joining the NASA Astronaut Corps as part of what the press dubbed "the New Nine"; without hesitation, Armstrong said yes.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Sep 17, 1962

    NASA announcement of The Selection of The Second Group

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Sep 17, 1962

    The selections were kept secret until three days later, although newspaper reports had circulated since earlier that year that he would be selected as the "first civilian astronaut".Armstrong was one of two civilian pilots selected for this group; the other was Elliot See, another former naval aviator. NASA announced the selection of the second group at a press conference on September 17, 1962. Compared with the Mercury Seven astronauts, they were younger, and had more impressive academic credentials.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Feb 08, 1965

    The backup Crew For Gemini 5

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Feb 08, 1965

    On February 8, 1965, Armstrong and Elliot See were announced as the backup crew for Gemini 5, with Armstrong as commander, supporting the prime crew of Gordon Cooper and Pete Conrad.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Sep 20, 1965

    Announcing The Crew assignments For Gemini 8

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Sep 20, 1965

    The crew assignments for Gemini 8 were announced on September 20, 1965. Under the normal rotation system, the backup crew for one mission became the prime crew for the third mission after, but Slayton designated David Scott as the pilot of Gemini 8. Scott was the first member of the third group of astronauts, whose selection was announced on October 18, 1963, to receive a prime crew assignment.


  • Launch Complex 19 - Titan rocket, Gemini program, Cape Kennedy, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Mar 16, 1966

    The Launching of Gemini 8

    Launch Complex 19 - Titan rocket, Gemini program, Cape Kennedy, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Mar 16, 1966

    Gemini 8 launched on March 16, 1966. And Armstrong became the first American civilian in space.


  • Launch Complex 19 - Titan rocket, Gemini program, Cape Kennedy, Florida, U.S.
    Monday Sep 12, 1966

    The Final assignment For Armstrong in The Gemini Program

    Launch Complex 19 - Titan rocket, Gemini program, Cape Kennedy, Florida, U.S.
    Monday Sep 12, 1966

    The final assignment for Armstrong in the Gemini program was as the back-up Command Pilot for Gemini 11, announced two days after the landing of Gemini 8. The launch was on September 12, 1966, with Conrad and Gordon on board, who successfully completed the mission objectives, while Armstrong served as a capsule communicator (CAPCOM).


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Friday Jan 27, 1967

    The Signing of The United Nations Outer Space Treaty, and The Apollo 1 Fire

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Friday Jan 27, 1967

    On January 27, 1967, the day of the Apollo 1 fire, Armstrong was in Washington, DC with Cooper, Gordon, Lovell and Scott Carpenter for the signing of the United Nations Outer Space Treaty. The astronauts chatted with the assembled dignitaries until 18:45, when Carpenter went to the airport, and the others returned to the Georgetown Inn, where they each found messages to phone the Manned Spacecraft Center. During these calls, they learned of the deaths of Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee in the fire. Armstrong and the group spent the rest of the night drinking scotch and discussing what had happened.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 05, 1967

    The Meeting With Slayton

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 05, 1967

    On April 5, 1967, the same day the Apollo 1 investigation released its final report, Armstrong and 17 other astronauts gathered for a meeting with Slayton. The first thing Slayton said was, "The guys who are going to fly the first lunar missions are the guys in this room." According to Cernan, only Armstrong showed no reaction to the statement. To Armstrong it came as no surprise—the room was full of veterans of Project Gemini, the only people who could fly the lunar missions. Slayton talked about the planned missions and named Armstrong to the backup crew for Apollo 9, which at that stage was planned as a medium Earth orbit test of the combined lunar module and command and service module.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Nov 20, 1967

    Announcing The New Apollo Crew assignment

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Nov 20, 1967

    The New Apollo Crew assignment was officially announced November 20, 1967.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Dec 23, 1968

    Slayton offered Armstrong The Post of Commander of Apollo 11

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Dec 23, 1968

    After Armstrong served as backup commander for Apollo 8, Slayton offered him the post of commander of Apollo 11 on December 23, 1968, as Apollo 8 orbited the Moon.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Thursday Jan 09, 1969

    The official announcement of Apollo 11

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Thursday Jan 09, 1969

    The crew of Apollo 11 was officially announced on January 9, 1969, as Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin, with Lovell, Anders, and Fred Haise as the backup crew.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Mar, 1969

    Determining The First Person on The Moon

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Mar, 1969

    According to Chris Kraft, a March 1969 meeting among Slayton, George Low, Bob Gilruth, and Kraft determined that Armstrong would be the first person on the Moon, in part because NASA management saw him as a person who did not have a large ego.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Apr 14, 1969

    The Reason For Choosing Armstrong To be The First

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Apr 14, 1969

    A press conference on April 14, 1969, gave the design of the LM cabin as the reason for Armstrong's being first; the hatch opened inwards and to the right, making it difficult for the lunar module pilot, on the right-hand side, to exit first.


  • Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Jul 16, 1969

    Apollo 11 Launch

    Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Jul 16, 1969

    A Saturn V rocket launched Apollo 11 from Launch Complex 39 site at the Kennedy Space Center on July 16, 1969, at 13:32:00 UTC (09:32:00 EDT local time).


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Jul 20, 1969
    08:17:00 PM

    The Landing on the surface of the Moon

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Jul 20, 1969

    The landing on the surface of the Moon occurred several seconds after 20:17:40 UTC on July 20, 1969.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Jul 21, 1969
    02:56:00 AM

    The First Moon walk

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Jul 21, 1969

    The flight plan called for a crew rest period before extravehicular activity, but Armstrong requested the EVA be moved to earlier in the evening, Houston time. When he and Aldrin were ready to go outside, Eagle was depressurized, the hatch was opened, and Armstrong made his way down the ladder. At the bottom of the ladder Armstrong said, "I'm going to step off the LM now". He turned and set his left boot on the lunar surface at 02:56 UTC July 21, 1969, then spoke the now-famous words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Jul 21, 1969
    03:15:00 AM

    The Second human To walk on the Moon

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Monday Jul 21, 1969

    About 19 minutes after Armstrong's first step, Aldrin joined him on the surface, becoming the second human to walk on the Moon. They began their tasks of investigating how easily a person could operate on the lunar surface. Armstrong unveiled a plaque commemorating the flight, and with Aldrin, planted the flag of the United States.


  • North Pacific Ocean
    Thursday Jul 24, 1969
    04:50:00 PM

    Return To Earth

    North Pacific Ocean
    Thursday Jul 24, 1969

    After they re-entered the LM, the hatch was closed and sealed. While preparing for the liftoff from the lunar surface, Armstrong and Aldrin discovered that, in their bulky space suits, they had broken the ignition switch for the ascent engine; using part of a pen, they pushed the circuit breaker in to activate the launch sequence. The Eagle then continued to its rendezvous in lunar orbit, where it docked with Columbia, the command and service module. The three astronauts returned to Earth and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, to be picked up by the USS Hornet.


  • Los Angeles, California, U.S.
    1970

    Master of Science degree In Aerospace Engineering

    Los Angeles, California, U.S.
    1970

    In 1970 he completed his Master of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC).


  • U.S.
    1994

    1st Divorce

    U.S.
    1994

    Armstrong and his first wife, Janet, separated in 1990, and divorced in 1994, after 38 years of marriage.


  • Ohio, U.S.
    Sunday Jun 12, 1994

    2nd Marriage

    Ohio, U.S.
    Sunday Jun 12, 1994

    He met his second wife, Carol Held Knight, at a golf tournament in 1992, when they were seated together at breakfast. She said little to Armstrong, but two weeks later he called her to ask what she was doing. She replied that she was cutting down a cherry tree, and 35 minutes later Armstrong was at her house to help. They were married in Ohio on June 12, 1994, and had a second ceremony at San Ysidro Ranch in California. He lived in Indian Hill, Ohio.


  • Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
    Saturday Aug 25, 2012

    Death

    Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
    Saturday Aug 25, 2012

    Armstrong underwent bypass surgery on August 7, 2012 to relieve blocked coronary arteries. Although he was reportedly recovering well, he developed complications in the hospital and died on August 25, in Cincinnati, Ohio, aged 82.


  • The Atlantic Ocean
    Friday Sep 14, 2012

    Armstrong's Cremated Remains

    The Atlantic Ocean
    Friday Sep 14, 2012

    On September 14, Armstrong's cremated remains were scattered in the Atlantic Ocean from the USS Philippine Sea. Flags were flown at half-staff on the day of Armstrong's funeral.


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