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  • Tuskegee, Alabama, U.S.
    Tuesday Feb 04, 1913

    Born

    Tuskegee, Alabama, U.S.
    Tuesday Feb 04, 1913

    Rosa Parks was born Rosa Louise McCauley in Tuskegee, Alabama, on February 4, 1913, to Leona (née Edwards), a teacher, and James McCauley, a carpenter.




  • U.S.
    Sunday Dec 18, 1932

    Marriage

    U.S.
    Sunday Dec 18, 1932

    In 1932, Rosa married Raymond Parks, a barber from Montgomery. He was a member of the NAACP, which at the time was collecting money to support the defense of the Scottsboro Boys, a group of black men falsely accused of raping two white women.




  • U.S.
    1933

    Graduation

    U.S.
    1933

    Rosa took numerous jobs, ranging from domestic worker to hospital aide. At her husband's urging, she finished her high school studies in 1933, at a time when less than 7% of African Americans had a high-school diploma.




  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    1943

    The 1st bus Incident

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    1943

    In 1900, Montgomery had passed a city ordinance to segregate bus passengers by race. Conductors were empowered to assign seats to achieve that goal. One day in 1943, Parks boarded a bus and paid the fare. She then moved to her seat but driver James F. Blake told her to follow city rules and enter the bus again from the back door. When Parks exited the vehicle, Blake drove off without her. Parks waited for the next bus, determined never to ride with Blake again.




  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Dec, 1943

    Parks became Active In The Civil Rights Movement

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Dec, 1943

    In December 1943, Parks became active in the civil rights movement, joined the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was elected secretary at a time when this was considered a woman's job. She later said, "I was the only woman there, and they needed a secretary, and I was too timid to say no." She continued as secretary until 1957.




  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    1944

    She Held a brief Job at Maxwell Air Force Base

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    1944

    Sometime soon after 1944, she held a brief job at Maxwell Air Force Base, which, despite its location in Montgomery, Alabama, did not permit racial segregation because it was federal property.




  • Alabama, U.S.
    1944

    She Investigated The gang-rape of Recy Taylor

    Alabama, U.S.
    1944

    In 1944, in her capacity as secretary, she investigated the gang-rape of Recy Taylor, a black woman from Abbeville, Alabama. Parks and other civil rights activists organized "The Committee for Equal Justice for Mrs. Recy Taylor", launching what the Chicago Defender called "the strongest campaign for equal justice to be seen in a decade."


  • U.S.
    1945

    She Succeeded In Registering To Vote

    U.S.
    1945

    In 1945, despite the Jim Crow laws and discrimination by registrars, she succeeded in registering to vote on her third try.


  • Monteagle, Tennessee, USA
    1955

    Attending The Highlander Folk School

    Monteagle, Tennessee, USA
    1955

    Parks worked as a housekeeper and seamstress for Clifford and Virginia Durr, a white couple. Politically liberal, the Durrs became her friends. They encouraged—and eventually helped sponsor—Parks in the summer of 1955 to attend the Highlander Folk School, an education center for activism in workers' rights and racial equality in Monteagle, Tennessee. There Parks was mentored by the veteran organizer Septima Clark.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Sunday Nov 27, 1955

    Rosa Parks attended a Mass Meeting at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Sunday Nov 27, 1955

    In August 1955, black teenager Emmett Till was brutally murdered after reportedly flirting with a young white woman while visiting relatives in Mississippi. On November 27, 1955, four days before she would make her stand on the bus, Rosa Parks attended a mass meeting at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery that addressed this case as well as the recent murders of the activists George W. Lee and Lamar Smith. The featured speaker was T. R. M. Howard, a black civil rights leader from Mississippi who headed the Regional Council of Negro Leadership.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Thursday Dec 01, 1955

    Parks was Arrested

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Thursday Dec 01, 1955

    When Parks refused to give up her seat, a police officer arrested her. As the officer took her away, she recalled that she asked, "Why do you push us around?" She remembered him saying, "I don't know, but the law's the law, and you're under arrest." She later said, "I only knew that, as I was being arrested, that it was the very last time that I would ever ride in humiliation of this kind. ... ". Parks was charged with a violation of Chapter 6, Section 11 segregation law of the Montgomery City code, although technically she had not taken a white-only seat; she had been in a colored section. Edgar Nixon, president of the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP and leader of the Pullman Porters Union, and her friend Clifford Durr bailed Parks out of jail that evening.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Thursday Dec 01, 1955
    06:00:00 PM

    The 2nd bus Incident

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Thursday Dec 01, 1955

    around 6 p.m., Thursday, December 1, 1955, in downtown Montgomery. She paid her fare and sat in an empty seat in the first row of back seats reserved for blacks in the "colored" section. Near the middle of the bus, her row was directly behind the ten seats reserved for white passengers. Initially, she did not notice that the bus driver was the same man, James F. Blake, who had left her in the rain in 1943. As the bus traveled along its regular route, all of the white-only seats in the bus filled up. The bus reached the third stop in front of the Empire Theater, and several white passengers boarded. Blake noted that two or three white passengers were standing, as the front of the bus had filled to capacity. He moved the "colored" section sign behind Parks and demanded that four black people give up their seats in the middle section so that the white passengers could sit. Parks moved, but toward the window seat; she did not get up to move to the redesignated colored section. Parks later said about being asked to move to the rear of the bus, "I thought of Emmett Till and I just couldn't go back." Blake said, "Why don't you stand up?" Parks responded, "I don't think I should have to stand up." Blake called the police to arrest Parks.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Sunday Dec 04, 1955

    The Montgomery Bus boycott

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Sunday Dec 04, 1955

    On Sunday, December 4, 1955, plans for the Montgomery bus boycott were announced at black churches in the area, and a front-page article in the Montgomery Advertiser helped spread the word. At a church rally that night, those attending agreed unanimously to continue the boycott until they were treated with the level of courtesy they expected, until black drivers were hired, and until seating in the middle of the bus was handled on a first-come basis.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Monday Dec 05, 1955

    Parks Was Tried on Charges of disorderly Conduct and Violating a Local Ordinance

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Monday Dec 05, 1955

    The next day, Parks was tried on charges of disorderly conduct and violating a local ordinance. The trial lasted 30 minutes. After being found guilty and fined $10, plus $4 in court costs, Parks appealed her conviction and formally challenged the legality of racial segregation.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Monday Dec 05, 1955

    Discussing Actions To Respond To Parks' Arrest

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Monday Dec 05, 1955

    That Monday night, 50 leaders of the African-American community gathered to discuss actions to respond to Parks' arrest. Edgar Nixon, the president of the NAACP, said, "My God, look what segregation has put in my hands!" Parks was considered the ideal plaintiff for a test case against city and state segregation laws, as she was seen as a responsible, mature woman with a good reputation.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Monday Dec 05, 1955

    Discussing The boycott Strategies

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Monday Dec 05, 1955

    After the success of the one-day boycott, a group of 16 to 18 people gathered at the Mt. Zion AME Zion Church to discuss boycott strategies. At that time Parks was introduced but not asked to speak, despite a standing ovation and calls from the crowd for her to speak; when she asked if she should say something, the reply was, "Why, you've said enough." The group agreed that a new organization was needed to lead the boycott effort if it were to continue. Rev. Ralph Abernathy suggested the name "Montgomery Improvement Association" (MIA). The name was adopted, and the MIA was formed. Its members elected as their president Martin Luther King, Jr., a relative newcomer to Montgomery, who was a young and mostly unknown minister of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1957

    Moving North To Detroit

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1957

    At the urging of her brother and sister-in-law in Detroit, Sylvester and Daisy McCauley, Rosa and Raymond Parks and her mother moved north to join them. The City of Detroit attempted to cultivate a progressive reputation, but Parks encountered numerous signs of discrimination against African-Americans.


  • Hampton, Virginia, U.S.
    1957

    Raymond and Rosa Parks Left Montgomery For Hampton

    Hampton, Virginia, U.S.
    1957

    In 1957, Raymond and Rosa Parks left Montgomery for Hampton, Virginia; mostly because she was unable to find work. She also disagreed with King and other leaders of Montgomery's struggling civil rights movement about how to proceed, and was constantly receiving death threats.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1962

    The Governement's Policies Effect on Detroit

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1962

    Like many Detroit blacks, Parks remained particularly concerned about housing issues. She herself lived in a neighborhood, Virginia Park, which had been compromised by highway construction and urban renewal. By 1962, these policies had destroyed 10,000 structures in Detroit, displacing 43,096 people, 70 percent of them African-American. Parks lived just a mile from the epicenter of the riot that took place in Detroit in 1967, and she considered housing discrimination a major factor that provoked the disorder.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 30, 1967

    She Served on a "people's Tribunal" investigating The killing of Three young Men

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 30, 1967

    Parks collaborated with members of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers and the Republic of New Afrika in raising awareness of police abuse during the conflict. She served on a "people's tribunal" on August 30, 1967, investigating the killing of three young men by police during the 1967 Detroit uprising, in what came to be known as the Algiers Motel incident.


  • U.S.
    1970s

    Parks Organized For The Freedom of Political Prisoners In The U.S.

    U.S.
    1970s

    In the 1970s, Parks organized for the freedom of political prisoners in the United States, particularly cases involving issues of self-defense.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Friday Aug 19, 1977

    Her Husband's Death

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Friday Aug 19, 1977

    Her husband died of throat cancer on August 19, 1977, and her brother, her only sibling, died of cancer that November. Her personal ordeals caused her to become removed from the civil rights movement.


  • U.S.
    1979

    Moving with her Mother into an apartment for Senior Citizens

    U.S.
    1979

    She decided to move with her mother into an apartment for senior citizens. There she nursed her mother Leona through the final stages of cancer and geriatric dementia until she died in 1979 at the age of 92.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1980

    Parks Co-Founded The Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1980

    In 1980, Parks—widowed and without immediate family—rededicated herself to civil rights and educational organizations. She co-founded the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation for college-bound high school seniors, to which she donated most of her speaker fees.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Feb, 1987

    Parks Co-Founded The Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute For Self Development

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Feb, 1987

    In February 1987 she co-founded, with Elaine Eason Steele, the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development, an institute that runs the "Pathways to Freedom" bus tours which introduce young people to important civil rights and Underground Railroad sites throughout the country.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1992

    Parks Published Rosa Parks: My Story

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    1992

    In 1992, Parks published Rosa Parks: My Story, an autobiography aimed at younger readers, which recounts her life leading to her decision to keep her seat on the bus. A few years later, she published Quiet Strength (1995), her memoir, which focuses on her faith.


  • Missouri, U.S.
    1994

    The Missouri Legislature Voted To Name The Highway Section The "Rosa Parks Highway"

    Missouri, U.S.
    1994

    In 1994 the Ku Klux Klan applied to sponsor a portion of United States Interstate 55 in St. Louis County and Jefferson County, Missouri, near St. Louis, for cleanup (which allowed them to have signs stating that this section of highway was maintained by the organization). Since the state could not refuse the KKK's sponsorship, the Missouri legislature voted to name the highway section the "Rosa Parks Highway". When asked how she felt about this honor, she is reported to have commented, "It is always nice to be thought of."


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 30, 1994

    Parks Was Robbed and Assaulted In Her Home

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 30, 1994

    At age 81 Parks was robbed and assaulted in her home in central Detroit on August 30, 1994. The assailant, Joseph Skipper, broke down the door but claimed he had chased away an intruder. He requested a reward and when Parks paid him, he demanded more. Parks refused and he attacked her. Hurt and badly shaken, Parks called a friend, who called the police. A neighborhood manhunt led to Skipper's capture and reported beating.


  • U.S.
    1999

    Her Last Appearance on Film

    U.S.
    1999

    In 1999 Parks filmed a cameo appearance for the television series Touched by an Angel. It was her last appearance on film; Parks began to suffer from health problems due to old age.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    2002

    Parks Received an Eviction Notice

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    2002

    In 2002 Parks received an eviction notice from her $1,800 per month apartment for non-payment of rent. Parks was incapable of managing her own financial affairs by this time due to age-related physical and mental decline. Her rent was paid from a collection taken by Hartford Memorial Baptist Church in Detroit.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Monday Oct 24, 2005

    Death

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Monday Oct 24, 2005

    Parks died of natural causes on October 24, 2005, at the age of 92, in her apartment on the east side of Detroit.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. & Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Thursday Oct 27, 2005

    Reserving The Front Seats of The City Buses With Black Ribbons In Honor of Parks

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. & Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Thursday Oct 27, 2005

    City officials in Montgomery and Detroit announced on October 27, 2005, that the front seats of their city buses would be reserved with black ribbons in honor of Parks until her funeral.


  • Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Saturday Oct 29, 2005

    Parks' coffin was Flown to Montgomery

    Montgomery, Alabama, U.S.
    Saturday Oct 29, 2005

    Parks' coffin was flown to Montgomery and taken in a horse-drawn hearse to the St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church, where she lay in repose at the altar on October 29, 2005, dressed in the uniform of a church deaconess. A memorial service was held there the following morning.


  • Washington, D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Oct 30, 2005

    The Casket was Transported to Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Oct 30, 2005

    In the evening the casket was transported to Washington, D.C. and transported by a bus similar to the one in which she made her protest, to lie in honor in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol.


  • Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 02, 2005

    Her Funeral

    Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
    Wednesday Nov 02, 2005

    With her body and casket returned to Detroit, for two days, Parks lay in repose at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Her funeral service was seven hours long and was held on November 2, 2005, at the Greater Grace Temple Church in Detroit.


  • Berlin, Germany
    2016

    Rosa's Detroit House was Partly Restored

    Berlin, Germany
    2016

    In 2016 Rosa's Detroit house was disassembled, moved to Berlin, and partly restored.


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