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  • France
    1865

    The French Idea

    France
    1865

    According to the National Park Service, the idea of a monument presented by the French people to the United States was first proposed by Édouard René de Laboulaye, president of the French Anti-Slavery Society and a prominent and important political thinker of his time. The project is traced to a mid-1865 conversation between Laboulaye, a staunch abolitionist, and Frédéric Bartholdi, a sculptor. In after-dinner conversation at his home near Versailles, Laboulaye, an ardent supporter of the Union in the American Civil War, is supposed to have said: "If a monument should rise in the United States, as a memorial to their independence, I should think it only natural if it were built by united effort—a common work of both our nations".




  • France
    1870

    Working on The Project

    France
    1870

    Bartholdi had made the first model of his concept in 1870. The son of a friend of Bartholdi's, U.S. artist John LaFarge, later maintained that Bartholdi made the first sketches for the statue during his U.S. visit at La Farge's Rhode Island studio. Bartholdi continued to develop the concept following his return to France. He also worked on a number of sculptures designed to bolster French patriotism after the defeat of the Prussians.




  • New York, U.S.
    Jun, 1871

    Bartholdi went to the U.S.

    New York, U.S.
    Jun, 1871

    Due to the Franco-Prussian War, Bartholdi's home province of Alsace was lost to the Prussians, and a more liberal republic was installed in France. As Bartholdi had been planning a trip to the United States, he and Laboulaye decided the time was right to discuss the idea with influential Americans. In June 1871, Bartholdi crossed the Atlantic, with letters of introduction signed by Laboulaye.




  • New York, U.S.
    1871

    Bartholdi choosing the Bedloe's Island

    New York, U.S.
    1871

    Arriving at New York Harbor, Bartholdi focused on Bedloe's Island (now named Liberty Island) as a site for the statue, struck by the fact that vessels arriving in New York had to sail past it. He was delighted to learn that the island was owned by the United States government—it had been ceded by the New York State Legislature in 1800 for harbor defense. It was thus, as he put it in a letter to Laboulaye: "land common to all the states".




  • U.S.
    1871

    Gathering Americans Opinions

    U.S.
    1871

    As well as meeting many influential New Yorkers, Bartholdi visited President Ulysses S. Grant, who assured him that it would not be difficult to obtain the site for the statue. Bartholdi crossed the United States twice by rail and met many Americans who he thought would be sympathetic to the project. But he remained concerned that popular opinion on both sides of the Atlantic was insufficiently supportive of the proposal, and he and Laboulaye decided to wait before mounting a public campaign.




  • France
    Sep, 1875

    Early work Announcement

    France
    Sep, 1875

    By 1875, France was enjoying improved political stability and a recovering postwar economy. The growing interest in the upcoming Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia led Laboulaye to decide it was time to seek public support. In September 1875, Bartholdi announced the project and the formation of the Franco-American Union as its fundraising arm. With the announcement, the statue was given a name, Liberty Enlightening the World.




  • Paris, France
    Tuesday Apr 25, 1876

    La Liberté éclairant le monde

    Paris, France
    Tuesday Apr 25, 1876

    Arranged events designed to appeal to the rich and powerful, including a special performance at the Paris Opera on April 25, 1876, that featured a new cantata by composer Charles Gounod. The piece was titled La Liberté éclairant le monde, the French version of the statue's announced name.


  • New York, U.S.
    May, 1876

    Bartholdi second Trip to The U.S.

    New York, U.S.
    May, 1876

    Although plans for the statue had not been finalized, Bartholdi moved forward with the fabrication of the right arm, bearing the torch, and the head. Work began at the Gadget, Gauthier & Co. workshop. In May 1876, Bartholdi traveled to the United States as a member of a French delegation to the Centennial Exhibition and arranged for a huge painting of the statue to be shown in New York as part of the Centennial festivities. The arm did not arrive in Philadelphia until August; because of its late arrival, it was not listed in the exhibition catalog, and while some reports correctly identified the work, others called it the "Colossal Arm" or "Bartholdi Electric Light". The exhibition grounds contained a number of monumental artworks to compete for fairgoers' interest, including an outsized fountain designed by Bartholdi. Nevertheless, the arm proved popular in the exhibition's waning days, and visitors would climb up to the balcony of the torch to view the fairgrounds. After the exhibition closed, the arm was transported to New York, where it remained on display in Madison Square Park for several years before it was returned to France to join the rest of the statue.


  • U.S.
    Saturday Mar 3, 1877

    American Committee

    U.S.
    Saturday Mar 3, 1877

    During his second trip to the United States, Bartholdi addressed a number of groups about the project and urged the formation of American committees of the Franco-American Union. Committees to raise money to pay for the foundation and pedestal were formed in New York, Boston, and Philadelphia. The New York group eventually took on most of the responsibility for American fundraising and is often referred to as the "American Committee". One of its members was 19-year-old Theodore Roosevelt, the future governor of New York and president of the United States. On March 3, 1877, on his final full day in office, President Grant signed a joint resolution that authorized the President to accept the statue when it was presented by France and to select a site for it. President Rutherford B. Hayes, who took office the following day, selected the Bedloe's Island site that Bartholdi had proposed.


  • France
    1878

    Completing the Head and Raising Francs

    France
    1878

    On his return to Paris in 1877, Bartholdi concentrated on completing the head, which was exhibited at the 1878 Paris World's Fair. Fundraising continued, with models of the statue put on sale. Tickets to view the construction activity at the Gadget, Gauthier & Co. workshop were also offered. The French government authorized a lottery; among the prizes were a valuable silver plate and a terracotta model of the statue. By the end of 1879, about 250,000 francs had been raised.


  • France
    1879

    Viollet-le-Duc

    France
    1879

    The head and arm had been built with assistance from Viollet-le-Duc, who fell ill in 1879. He soon died, leaving no indication of how he intended to transition from the copper skin to his proposed masonry pier.


  • France
    1880

    Gustave Eiffel

    France
    1880

    In 1880, Bartholdi was able to obtain the services of the innovative designer and builder Gustave Eiffel. Eiffel and his structural engineer, Maurice Koechlin, decided to abandon the pier and instead build an iron truss tower. Eiffel opted not to use a completely rigid structure, which would force stresses to accumulate in the skin and lead eventually to cracking. A secondary skeleton was attached to the center pylon, then, to enable the statue to move slightly in the winds of New York Harbor and as the metal expanded on hot summer days, he loosely connected the support structure to the skin using flat iron bars which culminated in a mesh of metal straps, known as "saddles", that were riveted to the skin, providing firm support. In a labor-intensive process, each saddle had to be crafted individually. To prevent galvanic corrosion between the copper skin and the iron support structure, Eiffel insulated the skin with asbestos impregnated with shellac.


  • France
    1882

    Statue was complete up to the Waist

    France
    1882

    By 1882, the statue was complete up to the waist, an event Barthodi celebrated by inviting reporters to lunch on a platform built within the statue.


  • New York, U.S.
    1890s

    First rivet paced into the Skin

    New York, U.S.
    1890s

    In a symbolic act, the first rivet placed into the skin, fixing a copper plate onto the statue's big toe, was driven by United States Ambassador to France Levi P. Morton. The skin was not, however, crafted in exact sequence from low to high; work proceeded on a number of segments simultaneously in a manner often confusing to visitors. Some work was performed by contractors—one of the fingers was made to Bartholdi's exacting specifications by a coppersmith in the southern French town of Montauban.


  • U.S.
    1882

    Fundraising in the U.S.

    U.S.
    1882

    Fundraising in the US for the pedestal had begun in 1882. The committee organized a large number of money-raising events. As part of one such effort, an auction of art and manuscripts, poet Emma Lazarus was asked to donate an original work. She initially declined, stating she could not write a poem about a statue. At the time, she was also involved in aiding refugees to New York who had fled anti-Semitic pogroms in eastern Europe. These refugees were forced to live in conditions that the wealthy Lazarus had never experienced. She saw a way to express her empathy for these refugees in terms of the statue. The resulting sonnet, "The New Colossus", including the iconic lines: "Give me your tired, your poor/Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free", is uniquely identified with the Statue of Liberty and is inscribed on a plaque in its museum.


  • New York, U.S.
    1884

    Fundraising Lagging

    New York, U.S.
    1884

    Even with these efforts, fundraising lagged. Grover Cleveland, the governor of New York, vetoed a bill to provide $50,000 for the statue project in 1884. An attempt the next year to have Congress provide $100,000, sufficient to complete the project, also failed. The New York committee, with only $3,000 in the bank, suspended work on the pedestal. With the project in jeopardy, groups from other American cities, including Boston and Philadelphia, offered to pay the full cost of erecting the statue in return for relocating it.


  • Paris, France
    Friday Jul 4, 1884

    Ferdinand de Lesseps

    Paris, France
    Friday Jul 4, 1884

    Laboulaye died in 1883. He was succeeded as chairman of the French committee by Ferdinand de Lesseps, builder of the Suez Canal. The completed statue was formally presented to Ambassador Morton at a ceremony in Paris on July 4, 1884, and de Lesseps announced that the French government had agreed to pay for its transport to New York.


  • Paris, France
    Jan, 1885

    Setting up the Statue for the Voyage

    Paris, France
    Jan, 1885

    The statue remained intact in Paris pending sufficient progress on the pedestal; by January 1885, this had occurred and the statue was disassembled and crated for its ocean voyage.


  • New York, U.S.
    Wednesday Jun 17, 1885

    Crates arriving at New York

    New York, U.S.
    Wednesday Jun 17, 1885

    On June 17, 1885, the French steamer Isère arrived in New York with the crates holding the disassembled statue on board. New Yorkers displayed their new-found enthusiasm for the statue. Two hundred thousand people lined the docks and hundreds of boats put to sea to welcome the ship.


  • New York, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 11, 1885

    120,000 Donors

    New York, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 11, 1885

    After five months of daily calls to donate to the statue fund, on August 11, 1885, the World announced that $102,000 had been raised from 120,000 donors and that 80 percent of the total had been received in sums of less than one dollar.


  • New York, U.S.
    Apr, 1886

    Completing the Pedestal

    New York, U.S.
    Apr, 1886

    Even with the success of the fund drive, the pedestal was not completed until April 1886. Immediately thereafter, reassembly of the statue began.


  • New York, U.S.
    Thursday Oct 28, 1886

    Ticker-Tape parade Beginning

    New York, U.S.
    Thursday Oct 28, 1886

    A ceremony of dedication was held on the afternoon of October 28, 1886. President Grover Cleveland, the former New York governor, presided over the event. On the morning of the dedication, a parade was held in New York City; estimates of the number of people who watched it ranged from several hundred thousand to a million. President Cleveland headed the procession, then stood in the reviewing stand to see bands and marchers from across America. General Stone was the grand marshal of the parade. The route began at Madison Square, once the venue for the arm, and proceeded to the Battery at the southern tip of Manhattan by way of Fifth Avenue and Broadway, with a slight detour so the parade could pass in front of the Worldbuilding on Park Row. As the parade passed the New York Stock Exchange, traders threw ticker tape from the windows, beginning the New York tradition of the ticker-tape parade.


  • New York, U.S.
    1906

    Mother of Exiles

    New York, U.S.
    1906

    Wars and other upheavals in Europe prompted large-scale emigration to the United States in the late 19th and early 20th century; many entered through New York and saw the statue not as a symbol of enlightenment, as Bartholdi had intended, but as a sign of welcome to their new home. The association with immigration only became stronger when an immigrant processing station was opened on nearby Ellis Island. This view was consistent with Lazarus's vision in her sonnet—she described the statue as "Mother of Exiles"—but her work had become obscure. In 1903, the sonnet was engraved on a plaque that was affixed to the base of the statue.


  • New York, U.S.
    1906

    Color Transformation

    New York, U.S.
    1906

    The statue rapidly became a landmark. Originally, it was a dull copper color, but shortly after 1900 a green patina, also called verdigris, caused by the oxidation of the copper skin, began to spread. As early as 1902 it was mentioned in the press; by 1906 it had entirely covered the statue. Believing that the patina was evidence of corrosion, Congress authorized US$62,800 (equivalent to $1,787,000 in 2019) for various repairs, and to paint the statue both inside and out. There was a considerable public protest against the proposed exterior painting. The Army Corps of Engineers studied the patina for any ill effects to the statue and concluded that it protected the skin, "softened the outlines of the Statue, and made it beautiful." The statue was painted only on the inside. The Corps of Engineers also installed an elevator to take visitors from the base to the top of the pedestal.


  • New York, U.S.
    Sunday Jul 30, 1916

    Damage to the statue during WWI

    New York, U.S.
    Sunday Jul 30, 1916

    On July 30, 1916, during World War I, German saboteurs set off a disastrous explosion on the Black Tom peninsula in Jersey City, New Jersey, in what is now part of Liberty State Park, close to Bedloe's Island. Carloads of dynamite and other explosives that were being sent to Britain and France for their war efforts were detonated. The statue sustained minor damage, mostly to the torch-bearing right arm, and was closed for ten days. The cost to repair the statue and buildings on the island was about $100,000 (equivalent to about $2,350,000 in 2019). The narrow ascent to the torch was closed for public-safety reasons, and it has remained closed ever since.


  • New York, U.S.
    Saturday Dec 2, 1916

    Lighting the Statue

    New York, U.S.
    Saturday Dec 2, 1916

    In 1916, Ralph Pulitzer, who had succeeded his father Joseph as the publisher of the World, began a drive to raise $30,000 (equivalent to $705,000 in 2019) for an exterior lighting system to illuminate the statue at night. He claimed over 80,000 contributors but failed to reach the goal. The difference was quietly made up by a gift from a wealthy donor—a fact that was not revealed until 1936. An underwater power cable brought electricity from the mainland and floodlights were placed along the walls of Fort Wood. Gutzon Borglum, who later sculpted Mount Rushmore, redesigned the torch, replacing much of the original copper with stained glass. On December 2, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson pressed the telegraph key that turned on the lights, successfully illuminating the statue.


  • U.S.
    1917

    WWI Recruitment

    U.S.
    1917

    After the United States entered World War I in 1917, images of the statue were heavily used in both recruitment posters and the Liberty bond drives that urged American citizens to support the war financially. This impressed upon the public the war's stated purpose—to secure liberty—and served as a reminder that embattled France had given the United States the statue.


  • New York, U.S.
    1924

    National Monument

    New York, U.S.
    1924

    In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge used his authority under the Antiquities Act to declare the statue a national monument.


  • New York, U.S.
    1929

    The only successful Suicide

    New York, U.S.
    1929

    The only successful suicide in the statue's history occurred in 1929 when a man climbed out of one of the windows in the crown and jumped to his death, glancing off the statue's breast and landing on the base.


  • New York, U.S.
    1944

    V for Victory

    New York, U.S.
    1944

    During World War II, the statue remained open to visitors, although it was not illuminated at night due to wartime blackouts. It was lit briefly on December 31, 1943, and on D-Day, June 6, 1944, when its lights flashed "dot-dot-dot-dash", the Morse code for V, for victory.


  • New York, U.S.
    1956

    Liberty Island

    New York, U.S.
    1956

    In 1956, an Act of Congress officially renamed Bedloe's Island as Liberty Island, a change advocated by Bartholdi generations earlier. The act also mentioned the efforts to found an American Museum of Immigration on the island, which backers took as federal approval of the project, though the government was slow to grant funds for it


  • New York, U.S.
    1965

    Ellis Island

    New York, U.S.
    1965

    Ellis Island was made part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument by proclamation of President Lyndon Johnson in 1965.


  • New York, U.S.
    1972

    Immigration museum

    New York, U.S.
    1972

    In 1972, the immigration museum, in the statue's base, was finally opened in a ceremony led by President Richard Nixon. The museum's backers never provided it with an endowment to secure its future and it closed in 1991 after the opening of an immigration museum on Ellis Island.


  • New York, U.S.
    Sunday Jul 4, 1976

    New Lighting System

    New York, U.S.
    Sunday Jul 4, 1976

    A powerful new lighting system was installed in advance of the American Bicentennial in 1976. The statue was the focal point for Operation Sail, a regatta of tall ships from all over the world that entered New York Harbor on July 4, 1976, and sailed around Liberty Island. The day concluded with a spectacular display of fireworks near the statue.


  • New York, U.S.
    1982

    Need of Restoration

    New York, U.S.
    1982

    The statue was examined in great detail by French and American engineers as part of the planning for its centennial in 1986. In 1982, it was announced that the statue was in need of considerable restoration. Careful study had revealed that the right arm had been improperly attached to the main structure. It was swaying more and more when strong winds blew and there was a significant risk of structural failure.


  • New York, U.S.
    May, 1982

    Statue of Liberty–Ellis Island Centennial Commission

    New York, U.S.
    May, 1982

    In May 1982, President Ronald Reagan announced the formation of the Statue of Liberty–Ellis Island Centennial Commission, led by Chrysler Corporation chair Lee Iacocca, to raise the funds needed to complete the work. Through its fundraising arm, the Statue of Liberty–Ellis Island Foundation, Inc., the group raised more than $350 million in donations for the renovations of both the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.


  • New York, U.S.
    Tuesday Sep 11, 2001

    The September 11 Attacks

    New York, U.S.
    Tuesday Sep 11, 2001

    Immediately following the September 11 attacks, the statue and Liberty Island were closed to the public. The island reopened at the end of 2001, while the pedestal and statue remained off-limits. The pedestal reopened in August 2004.


  • U.S.
    Sunday May 17, 2009

    Barrack Obama

    U.S.
    Sunday May 17, 2009

    On May 17, 2009, President Barack Obama's Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar, announced that as a "special gift" to America, the statue would be reopened to the public as of July 4, but that only a limited number of people would be permitted to ascend to the crown each day.


  • New York, U.S.
    Monday Mar 16, 2020

    Pandemic Closing

    New York, U.S.
    Monday Mar 16, 2020

    The statue closed beginning on March 16, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


  • New York, U.S.
    Monday Jul 20, 2020

    Partial Reopening

    New York, U.S.
    Monday Jul 20, 2020

    On July 20, 2020, the Statue of Liberty reopened partially under New York City's Phase IV guidelines, with Ellis Island remaining closed.


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