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  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1016

    Old Palace

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1016

    The Palace of Westminster site was strategically important during the Middle Ages, as it was located on the banks of the River Thames. Known in medieval times as Thorney Island, the site may have been first-used for a royal residence by Canute the Great during his reign from 1016 to 1035. St Edward the Confessor, the penultimate Anglo-Saxon monarch of England, built a royal palace on Thorney Island just west of the City of London at about the same time as he built Westminster Abbey (1045–1050). Thorney Island and the surrounding area soon became known as Westminster (a contraction of the words West Minster). Neither the buildings used by the Anglo-Saxons nor those used by William I survive. The oldest existing part of the Palace (Westminster Hall) dates from the reign of William I's successor, King William II.




  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1097

    Westminster Hall erected

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1097

    Westminster Hall, the oldest existing part of the Palace of Westminster, was erected in 1097 by King William II ('William Rufus'), at which point it was the largest hall in Europe.




  • London, England, United Kingdom
    13th Century

    Painted Chamber

    London, England, United Kingdom
    13th Century

    Because it was originally a royal residence, the Palace included no purpose-built chambers for the two Houses. Important state ceremonies were held in the Painted Chamber which had been originally built in the 13th century as the main bedchamber for King Henry III.




  • Westminster Hall, London, England, United Kingdom
    Tuesday Jan 20, 1265

    Simon de Montfort's parliament

    Westminster Hall, London, England, United Kingdom
    Tuesday Jan 20, 1265

    The Palace of Westminster was the monarch's principal residence in the late Medieval period. The predecessor of Parliament, the Curia Regis (Royal Council), met in Westminster Hall (although it followed the King when he moved to other palaces). Simon de Montfort's parliament, the first to include representatives of the major towns, met at the Palace in 1265.




  • Westminster Hall, London, England, United Kingdom
    1295

    Model Parliament

    Westminster Hall, London, England, United Kingdom
    1295

    The "Model Parliament", the first official Parliament of England, met there in 1295.




  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1393

    The new roof was commissioned

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1393

    The roof Westminster Hall was probably originally supported by pillars, giving three aisles, but during the reign of King Richard II, this was replaced by a hammerbeam roof by the royal carpenter Hugh Herland, "the greatest creation of medieval timber architecture", which allowed the original three aisles to be replaced with a single huge open space, with a dais at the end. The new roof was commissioned in 1393.




  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1512

    Fire destroyed the royal residential

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1512

    In 1512, during the early years of the reign of King Henry VIII, fire destroyed the royal residential ("privy") area of the palace.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1534

    Henry VIII acquired York Place from Cardinal Thomas Wolsey

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1534

    In 1534, Henry VIII acquired York Place from Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a powerful minister who had lost the King's favor. Renaming it the Palace of Whitehall, Henry used it as his principal residence. Although Westminster officially remained a royal palace, it was used by the two Houses of Parliament and by the various royal law courts.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1547

    The House of Commons

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1547

    The House of Commons, which did not have a chamber of its own, sometimes held its debates in the Chapter House of Westminster Abbey. The Commons acquired a permanent home at the Palace in St Stephen's Chapel, the former chapel of the royal palace, during the reign of Edward VI. In 1547 the building became available for the Commons' use following the disbanding of St Stephen's College. Alterations were made to St Stephen's Chapel over the following three centuries for the convenience of the lower House, gradually destroying, or covering up, its original mediaeval appearance. A major renovation project undertaken by Christopher Wren in the late 17th century completely redesigned the building's interior.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    16th Century

    Central Lobby

    London, England, United Kingdom
    16th Century

    Continuing north from the Central Lobby is the Commons' Corridor. It is of almost identical design to its southern counterpart and is decorated with scenes of 17th-century political history between the Civil War and the Revolution of 1688. They were painted by Edward Matthew Ward and include subjects like Monk Declaring for a Free Parliament and The Lords and Commons Presenting the Crown to William III and Mary II in the Banqueting Hall. Then, mirroring the arrangement at the Lords part of the Palace, is another antechamber, the Members' Lobby. In this room, Members of Parliament hold discussions or negotiations, and are often interviewed by accredited journalists, collectively known as "The Lobby".


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1605

    Failed Gunpowder Plot

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1605

    The failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605 was a conspiracy among a group of Roman Catholic gentry to re-establish Catholicism in England by assassinating the Protestant King James I and replacing him with a Catholic monarch. To this end, they placed large quantities of gunpowder beneath the House of Lords, which one of the conspirators, Guy Fawkes, would detonate during the State Opening of Parliament on 5 November 1605.


  • London, England
    Saturday Nov 05, 1605

    The Gunpowder Plot

    London, England
    Saturday Nov 05, 1605

    The medieval House of Lords chamber, which had been the target of the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605, was demolished as part of this work in order to create a new Royal Gallery and ceremonial entrance at the southern end of the palace.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Oct 29, 1618

    Sir Walter Raleigh was executed

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Oct 29, 1618

    Sir Walter Raleigh was executed at the Palace of Westminster on 29 October 1618.


  • Westminster Hall, London, England, United Kingdom
    1707

    British Parliaments

    Westminster Hall, London, England, United Kingdom
    1707

    After 1707, all British Parliaments have met at the Palace.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1755

    The Stone Building

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1755

    Calls for an entirely new palace went unheeded as instead more buildings of varying quality and style were added. A new west façade, known as the Stone Building, facing onto St Margaret's Street was designed by John Vardy built in the Palladian style between 1755 and 1770, providing more space for document storage and committee rooms.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1801

    White Chamber

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1801

    In 1801 the Upper House moved into the larger White Chamber (also known as the Lesser Hall), which had housed the Court of Requests; the expansion of the Peerage by King George III during the 18th century, along with the imminent Act of Union with Ireland, necessitated the move, as the original chamber could not accommodate the increased number of peers.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Jan 22, 1801

    House of Lords of the United Kingdom

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Jan 22, 1801

    The Chamber of the House of Lords is located in the southern part of the Palace of Westminster. The lavishly decorated room measures 13.7 by 24.4 metres (45 by 80 ft).


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday May 11, 1812

    Spencer Perceval assassinated

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday May 11, 1812

    The previous Palace of Westminster was also the site of a prime-ministerial assassination on 11 May 1812. While in the lobby of the House of Commons, on his way to a parliamentary inquiry, Spencer Perceval was shot and killed by a Liverpool merchant adventurer, John Bellingham. Perceval remains the only British Prime Minister to have been assassinated.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1824

    The palace complex was substantially remodeled

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1824

    The palace complex was substantially remodeled, this time by Sir John Soane, between 1824 and 1827.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Oct 16, 1834

    A Fire

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Oct 16, 1834

    On 16 October 1834, a fire broke out in the Palace after an overheated stove used to destroy the Exchequer's stockpile of tally sticks set fire to the House of Lords Chamber. In the resulting conflagration both Houses of Parliament were destroyed, along with most of the other buildings in the palace complex. Westminster Hall was saved thanks to fire-fighting efforts and a change in the direction of the wind. The Jewel Tower, the Undercroft Chapel and the Cloisters and Chapter House of St Stephen's were the only other parts of the Palace to survive.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Oct 16, 1834

    Victoria Tower

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Oct 16, 1834

    The largest and tallest tower is 98.5-metre (323 ft) Victoria Tower, which occupies the south-western corner of the Palace. Originally named "The King's Tower" because the fire of 1834 which destroyed the old Palace of Westminster occurred during the reign of King William IV, the tower was an integral part of Barry's original design, of which he intended it to be the most memorable element. The architect conceived the great square tower as the keep of a legislative "castle" (echoing his selection of the portcullis as his identifying mark in the planning competition), and used it as the royal entrance to the Palace and as a fireproof repository for the archives of Parliament. Victoria Tower was re-designed several times, and its height increased progressively; upon its completion in 1858, it was the tallest secular building in the world.


  • Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom
    1834

    A Rejected Gift

    Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom
    1834

    Immediately after the fire, King William IV offered the almost-completed Buckingham Palace to Parliament, hoping to dispose of a residence he disliked. The building was considered unsuitable for parliamentary use, however, and the gift was rejected.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Feb, 1835

    Works proceeded quickly

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Feb, 1835

    Works proceeded quickly and the chambers were ready for use by February 1835.


  • United Kingdom
    1839

    Charles Barry toured Britain

    United Kingdom
    1839

    In 1839 Charles Barry toured Britain, looking at quarries and buildings, with a committee which included two leading geologists and a stonecarver.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Apr 27, 1840

    The new Pugin-Barry design

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Apr 27, 1840

    The first stone of the new Pugin-Barry design was laid on 27 April 1840, by Barry's wife Sarah (née Rowsell).


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1847

    Lords Chamber was completed

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1847

    The Lords Chamber was completed in 1847.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1849

    Clear defects

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1849

    Barry's New Palace of Westminster was rebuilt using the sandy-colored Anston limestone. However, the stone soon began to decay due to pollution and the poor quality of some of the stone used. Although such defects were clear as early as 1849, nothing was done for the remainder of the 19th century even after much studying.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1852

    Commons Chamber was completed

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1852

    The Commons Chamber in 1852 (at which point Barry received a knighthood).


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1856

    National Portrait Gallery

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1856

    The Prince's Chamber is a small anteroom between the Royal Gallery and the Lords Chamber, named after the room adjoining the Parliament Chamber in the Old Palace of Westminster. Thanks to its location, it is a place where members of the Lords meet to discuss business of the House. Several doors lead out of the room, to the division lobbies of the House of Lords and to a number of important offices. The theme of the Prince's Chamber is Tudor history, and 28 oil portraits painted on panels around the room depict members of the Tudor dynasty. They are the work of Richard Burchett and his pupils, and their creation entailed extensive research, which contributed to the founding of the National Portrait Gallery in 1856. 12 bronze bas-reliefs are set into the wall below the portraits, executed by William Theed in 1855–1857.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1859

    Big Ben

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1859

    At the north end of the Palace rises the most famous of the towers, Elizabeth Tower, commonly known as Big Ben. At 96 metres (315 ft), it is only slightly shorter than Victoria Tower but much slimmer. Originally known simply as the Clock Tower (the name Elizabeth Tower was conferred on it in 2012 to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II), it houses the Great Clock of Westminster, built by Edward John Dent on designs by amateur horologist Edmund Beckett Denison.


  • London, England
    1860

    Most of the work had been carried out

    London, England
    1860

    Although most of the work had been carried out by 1860, construction was not finished until a decade afterwards.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Saturday Jan 24, 1885

    Fenian bombs

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Saturday Jan 24, 1885

    The New Palace became the target of Fenian bombs on 24 January 1885, along with the Tower of London.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1910s

    The Stonework had to be replaced

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1910s

    During the 1910s, however, it became clear that some of the stonework had to be replaced.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1928

    Clipsham stone

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1928

    In 1928 it was deemed necessary to use Clipsham stone, a honey-colored limestone from Rutland, to replace the decayed Anston. The project began in the 1930s but was halted by the outbreak of the Second World War, and completed only during the 1950s. By the 1960s pollution had again begun to take its toll. A stone conservation and restoration programme to the external elevations and towers began in 1981, and ended in 1994.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Feb, 1935

    Opening Speech

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Feb, 1935

    In his speech opening Parliament in February 1835, following the conclusion of that year's General Election, the King assured the members that the fire was accidental, and permitted Parliament to make "plans for [its] permanent accommodation". Each house created a committee and a public debate over the proposed styles ensued.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Sep 26, 1940

    One bomb fell into Old Palace Yard

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Sep 26, 1940

    During the Second World War, the Palace of Westminster was hit by bombs on fourteen separate occasions. One bomb fell into Old Palace Yard on 26 September 1940 and severely damaged the south wall of St Stephen's Porch and the west front.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1941

    Members' Lobby after bombing

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1941

    The room is similar to the Peers' Lobby but plainer in design and slightly larger, forming a cube 13.7 metres (45 ft) on all sides. After the heavy damage it sustained in the 1941 bombing, it was rebuilt in a simplified style, something most evident in the floor, which is almost completely unadorned. The archway of the door leading into the Commons Chamber has been left unrepaired as a reminder of the evils of war, and is now known as the Rubble Arch or Churchill Arch. It is flanked by bronze statues of Winston Churchill and David Lloyd George, the prime ministers who led Britain through the Second and First World War respectively; a foot of each is conspicuously shiny, a result of a long tradition of MPs rubbing them for good luck on their way in before their maiden speech. The Lobby contains the busts and statues of most 20th-century prime ministers, as well as two large boards where MPs can receive letters and telephone messages, designed for the use of the House and installed in the early 1960s.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Saturday May 10, 1941

    The Worst Raid

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Saturday May 10, 1941

    The worst raid took place in the night of 10–11 May 1941, when the Palace took at least twelve hits and three people (two policemen and the Resident Superintendent of the House of Lords, Edward Elliott) were killed.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1941

    Bomb hit the chamber of the House of Commons

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1941

    An incendiary bomb hit the chamber of the House of Commons and set it on fire; another set the roof of Westminster Hall alight. The firefighters could not save both, and a decision was taken to try to rescue the Hall.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1950s

    Commons Chamber was rebuilt

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1950s

    The Commons Chamber was rebuilt after the war under the architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, in a simplified version of the old chamber's style.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1950

    The Chamber of the House of Commons reopened

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1950

    The Chamber of the House of Commons is at the northern end of the Palace of Westminster; it was opened in 1950 after the Victorian chamber had been destroyed in 1941 and re-built under the architect Giles Gilbert Scott. The Chamber measures 14 by 20.7 metres (46 by 68 ft) and is plainer in style than the Lords Chamber; the benches, as well as other furnishings in the Commons side of the Palace, are coloured green. Members of the public are forbidden to sit on the benches. Other parliaments in Commonwealth nations, including those of India, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, have copied the colour scheme under which the Lower House is associated with green, and the Upper House with red.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Oct 26, 1950

    King George VI opened the new chamber in a ceremony which took place in Westminster Hall

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Thursday Oct 26, 1950

    The work was undertaken by John Mowlem & Co., and construction lasted until 1950, when King George VI opened the new chamber in a ceremony which took place in Westminster Hall on 26 October.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    May, 1951

    The Lords Chamber was then renovated over the ensuing months

    London, England, United Kingdom
    May, 1951

    The Lords Chamber was then renovated over the ensuing months; the Lords re-occupied it in May 1951.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Jun 17, 1974

    Bomb planted by the Provisional IRA

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Jun 17, 1974

    On 17 June 1974, a 9-kilogram (20 lb) bomb planted by the Provisional IRA exploded in Westminster Hall. The explosion and the resulting fire, which was fed by a ruptured gas main, injured 11 people and caused extensive damage.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    1975

    Parliament acquired office space in the nearby Norman Shaw Building

    London, England, United Kingdom
    1975

    As the need for office space in the Palace increased, Parliament acquired office space in the nearby Norman Shaw Building in 1975, and in the custom-built Portcullis House, completed in 2000. This increase has enabled all MPs to have their own office facilities.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Friday Mar 30, 1979

    A Car bomb

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Friday Mar 30, 1979

    A Car bomb claimed the life of Airey Neave, a prominent Conservative politician, while he was driving out of the Commons car park in New Palace Yard. The attack occurred on 30 March 1979, one day after the announcement of that year's general election; both the Irish National Liberation Army and the Provisional IRA claimed responsibility for Neave's assassination, but it is now accepted that the former were responsible.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Apr, 2012

    Four inner courtyards have been completed

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Apr, 2012

    The restoration of the inner courtyards is also ongoing. As of April 2012, four have been completed, including the two largest (Speaker's Court and Royal Court); the rest are scheduled to be completed by October 2016.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Oct, 2012

    The North Wall of Westminster Hall is undergoing restoration

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Oct, 2012

    As of October 2012, the north wall of Westminster Hall is undergoing restoration.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Jun, 2015

    The Cost to restore the Palace of Westminster

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Jun, 2015

    An Independent Options Appraisal Report released in June 2015 found that the cost to restore the Palace of Westminster could be as much as £7.1 billion if MPs were to remain at the Palace whilst works take place.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    2016

    Vacating the building for six years

    London, England, United Kingdom
    2016

    MPs decided in 2016 to vacate the building for six years starting in 2022.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Wednesday Mar 22, 2017

    Islamist-related terror attack

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Wednesday Mar 22, 2017

    On 22 March 2017 an Islamist-related terror attack happened in which a man stabbed a police officer after ploughing into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge. Five people were killed, including the attacker and the police officer.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Jan, 2018

    The House of Commons voted for both houses to vacate the Palace of Westminster to allow for a complete refurbishment of the building

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Jan, 2018

    In January 2018, the House of Commons voted for both houses to vacate the Palace of Westminster to allow for a complete refurbishment of the building which may take up to six years starting in 2025. It is expected that the House of Commons will be temporarily housed in a replica chamber to be located in Richmond House in Whitehall and the House of Lords will be housed at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in Parliament Square.


  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Aug, 2018

    Attack treated by prosecutors as terrorism

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Aug, 2018

    In August 2018 there was attack, treated by prosecutors as terrorism.


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