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  • Opera Square, Giza, Egypt
    Sunday Jan 1, 1978

    Ayman al-Zawahiri

    1st Marriage

    Opera Square, Giza, Egypt
    Sunday Jan 1, 1978

    In 1978, al-Zawahiri married his first wife, Azza Ahmed Nowari, a student at Cairo University who was studying philosophy. Their wedding, which was held at the Continental Hotel in Opera Square, was very conservative, with separate areas for both men and women, and no music, photographs, or light-hearted humour.




  • near the coast of Bombay, India
    Sunday Jan 1, 1978

    Plane Accidents

    Air India Flight 855

    near the coast of Bombay, India
    Sunday Jan 1, 1978

    Boeing 747-237B, Air India Flight 855 on January 1, 1978, crashed into the Arabian Sea just off the coast of Bombay, India, killing all 190 passengers and 23 crew on board. An investigation concluded that the captain became disoriented after the failure of one of the flight instruments in the cockpit, leading to "irrational control inputs" that caused the plane to crash.




  • Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.
    Monday Jan 2, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Bundy traveled by train to Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.
    Monday Jan 2, 1978

    From Chicago, Bundy traveled by train to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he was present in a local tavern on January 2.




  • Iran
    Friday Jan 6, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    The article "Iran and Red and Black Colonization"

    Iran
    Friday Jan 6, 1978

    On 7 January 1978, an article ("Iran and Red and Black Colonization") appeared in the national daily Ettela'at newspaper. Written under a pseudonym by a government agent, it denounced Khomeini as a "British agent" and a "mad Indian poet" conspiring to sell out Iran to neo-colonialists and communists. Upon the publishing of the article, religious seminary students in the city of Qom, angered over the insult to Khomeini, clashed with police. According to the government, two were killed in the clash; according to the opposition, seventy were killed and over five hundred were injured. However, the casualty figures are different in different sources.




  • Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 8, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Bundy arrived in Tallahassee

    Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 8, 1978

    Five days later, he stole a car and drove to Atlanta, where he boarded a bus and arrived in Tallahassee, Florida, on the morning of January 8. He rented a room under the alias Chris Hagen at the Holiday Inn near the Florida State University (FSU) campus.




  • Nicaragua
    Tuesday Jan 10, 1978

    Nicaraguan Revolution

    Pedro Joaquín Chamorro Cardenal was Murdered

    Nicaragua
    Tuesday Jan 10, 1978

    On 10 January 1978, the editor of the Managua newspaper La Prensa, and founder of the Union for Democratic Liberation (UDEL), Pedro Joaquín Chamorro Cardenal was murdered by suspected elements of the Somoza regime, and riots broke out in the capital city, Managua, targeting the Somoza regime.




  • Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Bundy entered FSU's Chi Omega sorority house

    Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    In the early hours of January 15, 1978—one week after his arrival in Tallahassee—Bundy entered FSU's Chi Omega sorority house through a rear door with a faulty locking mechanism.


  • Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978
    02 AM

    Ted Bundy

    Margaret Bowman

    Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978
    02 AM

    Beginning at about 2:45 a.m. Bundy bludgeoned Margaret Bowman, 21, with a piece of oak firewood as she slept, then garroted her with a nylon stocking.


  • Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Lisa Levy

    Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    Ted then entered the bedroom of 20-year-old Lisa Levy and beat her unconscious, strangled her, tore one of her nipples, bit deeply into her left buttock, and sexually assaulted her with a hair mist bottle.


  • Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Kathy Kleiner and Karen Chandler

    Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    In an adjoining bedroom Ted attacked Kathy Kleiner, breaking her jaw and deeply lacerating her shoulder; and Karen Chandler, who suffered a concussion, broken jaw, loss of teeth, and a crushed finger. Chandler and Kleiner survived the attack; Kleiner later attributed their survival to automobile headlights illuminating the interior of their room and frightening away the attacker.


  • Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Cheryl Thomas

    Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Jan 15, 1978

    Tallahassee detectives later determined that the four attacks took place in a total of fewer than 15 minutes, within earshot of more than 30 witnesses who heard nothing. After leaving the sorority house, Bundy broke into a basement apartment eight blocks away and attacked FSU student Cheryl Thomas, dislocating her shoulder and fracturing her jaw and skull in five places. She was left with permanent deafness and equilibrium damage that ended her dance career. On Thomas' bed, police found a semen stain and a pantyhose "mask" containing two hairs "similar to Bundy's in class and characteristic".


  • Nicaragua
    Monday Jan 23, 1978

    Nicaraguan Revolution

    A General Strike Called For The End of The Somoza Regime

    Nicaragua
    Monday Jan 23, 1978

    Following the riots, a general strike on 23–24 January called for the end of the Somoza regime and was, according to the U.S. State Department staff at the U.S. Embassy, successful at shutting down around 80% of businesses in not only Managua but also the provincial capitals of León, Granada, Chinandega, and Matagalpa.


  • Jacksonville, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Feb 8, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Leslie Parmenter

    Jacksonville, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Feb 8, 1978

    On February 8, Bundy drove 150 miles (240 km) east to Jacksonville, in a stolen FSU van. In a parking lot, he approached 14-year-old Leslie Parmenter, the daughter of Jacksonville Police Department's Chief of Detectives, identifying himself as "Richard Burton, Fire Department", but retreated when Parmenter's older brother arrived and challenged him.


  • Lake City, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Feb 8, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Kimberly Dianne Leach

    Lake City, Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Feb 8, 1978

    That afternoon, he backtracked 60 miles (97 km) westward to Lake City. At Lake City Junior High School the following morning, 12-year-old Kimberly Dianne Leach was summoned to her homeroom by a teacher to retrieve a forgotten purse; she never returned to class. Seven weeks later, after an intensive search, her partially mummified remains were found in a pig farrowing shed near Suwannee River State Park, 35 miles (56 km) northwest of Lake City.


  • U.S.
    Thursday Feb 9, 1978

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Father's death

    U.S.
    Thursday Feb 9, 1978

    His father's sudden death on February 9, 1878, devastated Roosevelt, but he eventually recovered and doubled his activities. Roosevelt gave up his earlier plan of studying natural science and instead decided to attend Columbia Law School, moving back into his family's home in New York City.


  • Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Feb 12, 1978

    Ted Bundy

    Bundy driving westward across the Florida Panhandle

    Florida, U.S.
    Sunday Feb 12, 1978

    On February 12, with insufficient cash to pay his overdue rent and a growing suspicion that police were closing in on him, Bundy stole a car and fled Tallahassee, driving westward across the Florida Panhandle.


  • Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Feb 15, 1978
    01 AM

    Ted Bundy

    Ted was stopped by Pensacola police officer David Lee

    Florida, U.S.
    Wednesday Feb 15, 1978
    01 AM

    Three days later, at around 1:00 am, Ted was stopped by Pensacola police officer David Lee near the Alabama state line after a "wants and warrants" check showed his Volkswagen Beetle was stolen. When told he was under arrest, Bundy kicked Lee's legs out from under him and took off running. Lee fired a warning shot followed by a second round, gave chase, and tackled him. The two struggled over Lee's gun before the officer finally subdued and arrested Bundy.


  • Tabriz, Iran
    Friday Feb 17, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    Demonstrations broke out in various different cities

    Tabriz, Iran
    Friday Feb 17, 1978

    According to the Shi'ite customs, memorial services (referred to as chehelom) are held forty days after a person's death. Encouraged by Khomeini (who declared that the blood of martyrs must water the "tree of Islam"), radicals pressured the mosques and moderate clergy to commemorate the deaths of the students, and used the occasion to generate protests. The informal network of mosques and bazaars, which for years had been used to carry out religious events, increasingly became consolidated as a coordinated protest organization. On 18 February, forty days after Qom clashes, demonstrations broke out in various different cities. The largest was in Tabriz, which descended into a full-scale riot. "Western" and government symbols such as cinemas, bars, state-owned banks, and police stations were set ablaze. Units of Imperial Iranian Army were deployed to the city to restore order, and the death toll, according to government was six, while Khomeini claimed hundreds were "martyred".


  • Hong Kong, China
    Wednesday Mar 1, 1978

    Jackie Chan

    1st major breakthrough

    Hong Kong, China
    Wednesday Mar 1, 1978

    Chan's first major breakthrough was the 1978 film Snake in the Eagle's Shadow, shot while he was loaned to Seasonal Film Corporation under a two-picture deal.[28] Director Yuen Woo-ping allowed Chan complete freedom over his stunt work. The film established the comedic kung fu genre, and proved refreshing to the Hong Kong audience.


  • United Kingdom
    Wednesday May 24, 1978

    Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon

    Decree nisi for their divorce was granted

    United Kingdom
    Wednesday May 24, 1978

    On 24 May 1978, the decree nisi for their divorce was granted.


  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
    Monday Jun 19, 1978

    Juneteenth

    Milwaukee celebration was described as drawing over 100,000 attendees

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
    Monday Jun 19, 1978

    The 1978 Milwaukee celebration was described as drawing over 100,000 attendees.


  • Turkey
    Tuesday Jul 4, 1978

    Recep Tayyip Erdoğan

    Marriage

    Turkey
    Tuesday Jul 4, 1978

    Erdoğan married Emine Gülbaran (born 1955, Siirt) on 4 July 1978.


  • New York, U.S.
    Saturday Jul 8, 1978

    Incandescent light bulb

    Albon Man started Electro-Dynamic Light Company

    New York, U.S.
    Saturday Jul 8, 1978

    Albon Man, a New York lawyer, started Electro-Dynamic Light Company in 1878 to exploit his patents and those of William Sawyer.


  • England, United Kingdom
    Tuesday Jul 11, 1978

    Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon

    Snowdens' divorce was finalized

    England, United Kingdom
    Tuesday Jul 11, 1978

    On 11 July 1978, the Snowdens' divorce was finalized.


  • New York, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 8, 1978

    Russell Bufalino

    The Extortion Attempt

    New York, U.S.
    Tuesday Aug 8, 1978

    On August 8, 1978, Bufalino was convicted and sentenced to four years imprisonment for his part in the extortion attempt. He served almost three years.


  • Isfahan, Iran
    Thursday Aug 10, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    Martial law was declared in Isfahan

    Isfahan, Iran
    Thursday Aug 10, 1978

    A series of escalating protests broke out in major cities, and deadly riots broke out in Isfahan where protesters fought for the release of Ayatollah Jalaluddin Taheri. Martial law was declared in the city on 11 August as symbols of Western culture and government buildings were burned, and a bus full of American workers was bombed. Due to his failure to stop the protests, Prime Minister Amuzegar offered his resignation.


  • Nicaragua
    Tuesday Aug 22, 1978

    Nicaraguan Revolution

    The FSLN Staged a Massive Kidnapping Operation

    Nicaragua
    Tuesday Aug 22, 1978

    On 22 August 1978 the FSLN staged a massive kidnapping operation. Led by Éden Pastora, the Sandinistan forces captured the National Palace while the legislature was in session, taking 2,000 hostages. Pastora demanded money, the release of Sandinistan prisoners, and, "a means of publicizing the Sandinista cause."After two days, the government agreed to pay $500,000 and to release certain prisoners, marking a major victory for the FSLN.


  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 23, 1978

    Kobe Bryant

    Birth and Early Life

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 23, 1978

    Bryant was born in Philadelphia, the youngest of three children and only son of former NBA player Joe Bryant and Pamela Cox Bryant. He was also the maternal nephew of basketball player John "Chubby" Cox. His parents named him after the famous beef of Kobe, Japan, which they saw on a restaurant menu. His middle name, Bean, was derived from his father's nickname "Jellybean". Bryant's family was Catholic and he had always practiced his faith.


  • Iran
    Saturday Aug 26, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    Appointment of Jafar Sharif-Emami as prime minister

    Iran
    Saturday Aug 26, 1978

    The Shah increasingly felt that he was losing control of the situation and hoped to regain it through complete appeasement. He decided to appoint Jafar Sharif-Emami to the post of prime minister, himself a veteran prime minister. Emami was chosen due to his family ties to the clergy, but he had a reputation of corruption during his previous premiership. Under the Shah's guidance, Sharif-Emami effectively began a policy of "appeasing the opposition's demands before they even made them".


  • Tehran, Iran
    Sunday Sep 3, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    The large march of Eid-e-Fitr

    Tehran, Iran
    Sunday Sep 3, 1978

    4 September was Eid-e-Fitr, the holiday celebrating the end of the month of Ramadan. A permit for an open air prayer was granted, in which 200,000–500,000 people attended. Instead, the clergy directed the crowd on a large march through the center of Tehran (the Shah reportedly watched the march from his helicopter, unnerved and confused). A few days later even larger protests took place, and for the first time protesters called for Khomeini's return and the establishment of an Islamic republic.


  • Tehran, Iran
    Thursday Sep 7, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    The Shah declared martial law in Tehran and 11 other major cities

    Tehran, Iran
    Thursday Sep 7, 1978

    At midnight on 8 September, the Shah declared martial law in Tehran and 11 other major cities throughout the country. All street demonstrations were banned, and a night-time curfew was established. Tehran's martial law commander was General Gholam-Ali Oveissi, who was known for his severity against opponents.


  • Tehran, Iran
    Friday Sep 8, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    Workers' strike at Tehran's main oil refinery

    Tehran, Iran
    Friday Sep 8, 1978

    On 9 September, 700 workers at Tehran's main oil refinery went on strike, and on 11 September the same occurred at refineries in five other cities.


  • Tehran, Iran
    Tuesday Sep 12, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    Government workers' strike at Tehran's

    Tehran, Iran
    Tuesday Sep 12, 1978

    On 13 September, central government workers in Tehran simultaneously went on strike.


  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Sep 17, 1978

    Jimmy Carter

    Camp David Accords

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Sep 17, 1978

    The Camp David Accords were signed by Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin on 17 September 1978, following twelve days of secret negotiations at Camp David.


  • Vatican City, Italy
    Thursday Sep 28, 1978

    Pope John Paul II

    The death of Pope John Paul I

    Vatican City, Italy
    Thursday Sep 28, 1978

    The papal conclave of October 1978 was triggered by the death of Pope John Paul I on 28 September just 33 days after his election on 26 August.


  • Paris, France
    Friday Oct 6, 1978

    Ruhollah Khomeini

    Visit to Paris

    Paris, France
    Friday Oct 6, 1978

    By this time discontent with the Shah was becoming intense and Khomeini visited Neauphle-le-Château, a suburb of Paris, France on a tourist visa on 6 October 1978.


  • Vatican City, Italy
    Sunday Oct 22, 1978

    Pope John Paul II

    A Pope

    Vatican City, Italy
    Sunday Oct 22, 1978

    John Paul II dispensed with the traditional Papal coronation and instead received ecclesiastical investiture with a simplified Papal inauguration on 22 October 1978. During his inauguration, when the cardinals were to kneel before him to take their vows and kiss his ring, he stood up as the Polish prelate Stefan Cardinal Wyszyński knelt down, stopped him from kissing the ring, and simply hugged him.


  • Paris, France
    Wednesday Nov 1, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    agreement for a draft constitution that would be "Islamic and democratic"

    Paris, France
    Wednesday Nov 1, 1978

    In November, secular National Front leader Karim Sanjabi flew to Paris to meet Khomeini. There the two signed an agreement for a draft constitution that would be "Islamic and democratic". It signaled the now official alliance between the clergy and the secular opposition.In order to help create a democratic facade, Khomeini placed Westernized figures (such as Sadegh Qotbzadeh and Ebrahim Yazdi) as the public spokesmen of the opposition, and never spoke to the media of his intentions to create a theocracy.


  • Tehran, Iran
    Saturday Nov 4, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    The Day Tehran Burned

    Tehran, Iran
    Saturday Nov 4, 1978

    On 5 November, demonstrations at University of Tehran became deadly after a fight broke out with armed soldiers. Within hours, Tehran broke out into a full-scale riot. Block after block of Western symbols such as movie theaters and department stores, as well as government and police buildings, were seized, looted, and burned. The British embassy in Tehran was partially burned and vandalized as well, and the American embassy nearly suffered the same fate (the event became known to foreign observers as "The Day Tehran Burned").


  • Iran
    Sunday Nov 5, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    Appointment of a military government

    Iran
    Sunday Nov 5, 1978

    On 6 November, the Shah dismissed Sharif-Emami from the post of prime minister, and chose to appoint a military government in its place. The Shah chose General Gholam-Reza Azhari to be prime minister because of his mild-mannered approach to the situation. The cabinet he would choose was a military cabinet in name only and consisted primarily of civilian leaders.


  • Iran
    Friday Dec 1, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    The Muharram protests

    Iran
    Friday Dec 1, 1978

    On 2 December 1978, the Muharram protests began. Named for the Islamic month they began in, the Muharram protests were impressively huge and pivotal. Over two million protesters (many of whom were teenagers organized by the mullahs from the mosques of southern Tehran) took to the streets, crowding Shahyad Square. Protesters frequently went out at night, defying the set curfew, often taking to rooftops and shouting "Allahu-Akbar" (God is Great). According to one witness, many of the clashes on the street had an air of playfulness rather than seriousness, with security forces using "kid gloves" against the opposition (nevertheless, the government reported at least 12 opposition deaths).


  • Spain
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1978

    Juan Carlos I

    The People ratify on The New Constitution

    Spain
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1978

    In 1978, the government promulgated a new constitution that acknowledged Juan Carlos as rightful heir of the Spanish dynasty and king; specifically, Title II, Section 57 asserted Juan Carlos's right to the throne of Spain by dynastic succession in the Bourbon tradition, as "the legitimate heir of the historic dynasty" rather than as the designated successor of Franco. The Constitution was passed by the democratically elected Constituent Cortes, ratified by the people in a referendum (6 December) and then signed into law by the King before a solemn meeting of the Cortes.


  • Lavizan barracks, Tehran, Iran
    Sunday Dec 10, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    Demoralization of The Army

    Lavizan barracks, Tehran, Iran
    Sunday Dec 10, 1978

    On 11 December, a dozen officers were shot dead by their own troops at Tehran's Lavizan barracks. Fearing further mutinies, many soldiers were returned to their barracks.Mashhad (the second largest city in Iran) was abandoned to the protesters, and in many provincial towns demonstrators were effectively in control.


  • England, United Kingdom
    Friday Dec 15, 1978

    Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon

    Snowdon married Lucy Lindsay-Hogg

    England, United Kingdom
    Friday Dec 15, 1978

    On 15 December 1978, Snowdon married Lucy Lindsay-Hogg.


  • Iran
    Wednesday Dec 27, 1978

    Iranian Revolution

    The return To Civilian Rule

    Iran
    Wednesday Dec 27, 1978

    The Shah began to search for a new prime minister, one who was a civilian and a member of the opposition. On 28 December, he secured an agreement with another major National Front figure, Shahpour Bakhtiar. Bakhtiar would be appointed prime minister (a return to civilian rule), while the Shah and his family would leave the country for a "vacation". His royal duties would be carried out by a Regency Council, and three months after his departure a referendum would be submitted to the people deciding on whether Iran would remain a monarchy or become a republic. A former opponent of the Shah, Bakhtiar became motivated to join the government because he was increasingly aware of Khomeini's intentions to implement hard-line religious rule rather than a democracy. Karim Sanjabi immediately expelled Bakhtiar from the National Front, and Bakhtiar was denounced by Khomeini (who declared that acceptance of his government was the equivalent of "obedience to false gods").


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