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  • U.S.
    Tuesday Nov 3, 1936

    Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Second Term

    U.S.
    Tuesday Nov 3, 1936

    The United States presidential election of 1936 was the thirty-eighth quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 1936. In the midst of the Great Depression, incumbent Democratic President Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Republican Governor Alf Landon of Kansas.




  • Valencia, Spain
    Friday Nov 6, 1936

    Spanish Civil War

    Republican government was forced to shift from Madrid to Valencia

    Valencia, Spain
    Friday Nov 6, 1936

    The Republican government was forced to shift from Madrid to Valencia, outside the combat zone, on 6 November.




  • Madrid, Spain
    Sunday Nov 8, 1936

    Spanish Civil War

    Francoist troops launched a major offensive toward Madrid

    Madrid, Spain
    Sunday Nov 8, 1936

    In October, the Francoist troops launched a major offensive toward Madrid, reaching it in early November and launching a major assault on the city on 8 November.




  • Germany
    Thursday Nov 12, 1936

    Computer

    The principle of The Modern Computer

    Germany
    Thursday Nov 12, 1936

    The principle of the modern computer was proposed by Alan Turing in his seminal 1936 paper,On Computable Numbers. Turing proposed a simple device that he called "Universal Computing machine" and that is now known as a universal Turing machine. He proved that such a machine is capable of computing anything that is computable by executing instructions (program) stored on tape, allowing the machine to be programmable. The fundamental concept of Turing's design is the stored program, where all the instructions for computing are stored in memory. Von Neumann acknowledged that the central concept of the modern computer was due to this paper.




  • Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Nov 16, 1936

    Edward VIII

    Edward invited Prime Minister Baldwin

    Buckingham Palace, London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Nov 16, 1936

    On 16 November 1936, Edward invited Prime Minister Baldwin to Buckingham Palace and expressed his desire to marry Simpson when she became free to remarry. Baldwin informed him that his subjects would deem the marriage morally unacceptable, largely because remarriage after divorce was opposed by the Church of England, and the people would not tolerate Simpson as queen.




  • Germany
    Wednesday Nov 25, 1936

    Adolf Hitler

    Anti-Comintern Pact

    Germany
    Wednesday Nov 25, 1936

    On 25 November, Germany signed the Anti-Comintern Pact with Japan. Britain, China, Italy, and Poland were also invited to join the Anti-Comintern Pact, but only Italy signed in 1937.




  • Berlin, Germany
    Wednesday Nov 25, 1936

    World War II

    Anti-Comintern Pact

    Berlin, Germany
    Wednesday Nov 25, 1936

    Germany and Japan signed the Anti-Comintern Pact in 25 November 1936.


  • London, England
    Monday Nov 30, 1936

    Alan Turing

    Turing Published his Paper "On Computable Numbers, With an Application To The Entscheidungsproblem"

    London, England
    Monday Nov 30, 1936

    In 1936, Turing published his paper "On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem". It was published in the Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society journal in two parts, the first on 30 November and the second on 23 December.


  • England
    Monday Nov 30, 1936

    The Imitation game: Alan Turing

    On Computable Numbers

    England
    Monday Nov 30, 1936

    Turing published his paper "On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem". It was published in the Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society journal in two parts, the first on 30 November and the second on 23 December. In this paper, Turing reformulated Kurt Gödel's 1931 results on the limits of proof and computation, replacing Gödel's universal arithmetic-based formal language with the formal and simple hypothetical devices that became known as Turing machines. The Entscheidungsproblem (decision problem) was originally posted by German mathematician David Hilbert in 1928. Turing proved that his "universal computing machine" would be capable of performing any conceivable mathematical computation if it were representable as an algorithm. He went on to prove that there was no solution to the decision problem by first showing that the halting problem for Turing machines is undecidable: It is not possible to decide algorithmically whether a Turing machine will ever halt.


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