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  • Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 1903

    St. Patrick's Day

    Official public holiday in Ireland

    Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 1903

    In 1903, St Patrick's Day became an official public holiday in Ireland. This was thanks to the Bank Holiday (Ireland) Act 1903, an act of the United Kingdom Parliament introduced by Irish Member of Parliament James O'Mara. O'Mara later introduced the law which required that public houses be shut on 17 March after drinking got out of hand, a provision that was repealed in the 1970s.




  • Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 1903

    St. Patrick's Day

    The first St Patrick's Day parade

    Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 1903

    The first St Patrick's Day parade in Ireland was held in Waterford in 1903. The week of St Patrick's Day 1903 had been declared Irish Language Week by the Gaelic League and in Waterford, they opted to have a procession on Sunday 15 March. The procession comprised the Mayor and members of Waterford Corporation, the Trades Hall, the various trade unions and bands who included the 'Barrack St Band' and the 'Thomas Francis Meagher Band'. The parade began at the premises of the Gaelic League in George's St and finished in the Peoples Park, where the public was addressed by the Mayor and other dignitaries. On Tuesday 17 March, most Waterford businesses—including public houses—were closed and marching bands paraded as they had two days previously. The Waterford Trades Hall had been emphatic that the National Holiday be observed.




  • Ireland
    Tuesday Nov 25, 1913

    Irish War of Independence

    The Irish Volunteers were formed

    Ireland
    Tuesday Nov 25, 1913

    On 25 November 1913, the Irish Volunteers were formed by Eoin MacNeill in response to the paramilitary Ulster Volunteer Force that had been founded earlier in the year to fight against Home Rule.




  • Ireland
    Friday Sep 18, 1914

    Irish War of Independence

    Third Home Rule Act

    Ireland
    Friday Sep 18, 1914

    The British Parliament passed the Third Home Rule Act on 18 September 1914 with an amending Bill for the partition of Ireland introduced by Ulster Unionist MPs, but the Act's implementation was immediately postponed by the Suspensory Act 1914 due to the outbreak of the First World War in the previous month. The majority of nationalists followed their IPP leaders and John Redmond's call to support Britain and the Allied war effort in Irish regiments of the New British Army, the intention being to ensure the commencement of Home Rule after the war.




  • Ireland
    Friday Mar 17, 1916

    St. Patrick's Day

    1916 Parades

    Ireland
    Friday Mar 17, 1916

    On St Patrick's Day 1916, the Irish Volunteers—an Irish nationalist paramilitary organization—held parades throughout Ireland. The authorities recorded 38 St Patrick's Day parades, involving 6,000 marchers, almost half of whom were said to be armed. The following month, the Irish Volunteers launched the Easter Rising against British rule. This marked the beginning of the Irish revolutionary period and led to the Irish War of Independence and the Civil War. During this time, St Patrick's Day celebrations in Ireland were muted, although the day was sometimes chosen to hold large political rallies. The celebrations remained low-key after the creation of the Irish Free State; the only state-organized observance was a military procession and trooping of the colors, and an Irish-language mass attended by government ministers.




  • Ireland
    Saturday Apr 1, 1916

    Irish War of Independence

    Irish republicans launched the Easter Rising against British rule

    Ireland
    Saturday Apr 1, 1916

    In April 1916, Irish republicans launched the Easter Rising against British rule and proclaimed an Irish Republic. Although it was crushed after a week of fighting, the Easter Rising and the British response led to greater popular support for Irish independence.




  • Ireland
    Monday Apr 8, 1918

    Irish War of Independence

    The Report of the Irish Convention

    Ireland
    Monday Apr 8, 1918

    In April 1918, the British Cabinet, in the face of the crisis caused by the German Spring Offensive, attempted with a dual policy to simultaneously link the enactment of conscription into Ireland with the implementation of Home Rule, as outlined in the report of the Irish Convention of 8 April 1918.


  • Ireland
    Saturday Dec 14, 1918

    Irish War of Independence

    The Republican party Sinn Féin won a landslide victory in Ireland

    Ireland
    Saturday Dec 14, 1918

    In the December 1918 election, the republican party Sinn Féin won a landslide victory in Ireland.


  • Soloheadbeg, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    Soloheadbeg Ambush

    Soloheadbeg, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    While it was not clear in the beginning of 1919 that the Dáil ever intended to gain independence by military means, and war was not explicitly threatened in Sinn Féin's 1918 manifesto, an incident occurred on 21 January 1919, the same day as the First Dáil convened. The Soloheadbeg Ambush, in County Tipperary, was led by Seán Treacy, Séumas Robinson, Seán Hogan and Dan Breen acting on their own initiative.


  • Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    Breakaway Government

    Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    On 21 January 1919 they formed a breakaway government (Dáil Éireann) and declared Irish independence.


  • Dublin, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    First Dáil

    Dublin, Ireland
    Tuesday Jan 21, 1919

    Sinn Féin won 91% of the seats outside of Ulster on 46.9% of votes cast, but was in a minority in Ulster, where unionists were in a majority. Sinn Féin pledged not to sit in the UK Parliament at Westminster, but rather to set up an Irish Parliament. This parliament, known as the First Dáil, and its ministry, called the Aireacht, consisting only of Sinn Féin members, met at the Mansion House on 21 January 1919.


  • Ireland
    Friday Apr 11, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    Ostracism of RIC men was announced

    Ireland
    Friday Apr 11, 1919

    A policy of ostracism of RIC men was announced by the Dáil on 11 April 1919.


  • Ireland
    Wednesday Aug 20, 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    Oath of Allegiance

    Ireland
    Wednesday Aug 20, 1919

    The Oath of Allegiance to the Irish Republic which the Dáil had instated on 20 August 1919.


  • Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Mar 20, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    Sinn Féin Lord Mayor of Cork Death

    Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Mar 20, 1920

    In March 1920, Tomás Mac Curtain, the Sinn Féin Lord Mayor of Cork, was shot dead in front of his wife at his home, by men with blackened faces who were seen returning to the local police barracks. The jury at the inquest into his death returned a verdict of wilful murder against David Lloyd George (the British Prime Minister) and District Inspector Swanzy, among others. Swanzy was later tracked down and killed in Lisburn, County Antrim. This pattern of killings and reprisals escalated in the second half of 1920 and in 1921.


  • Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Jul 17, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    British Colonel Gerald Smyth was assassinated by the IRA in the County Club in Cork city

    Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Jul 17, 1920

    On 17 July 1920, a British Colonel Gerald Smyth was assassinated by the IRA in the County Club in Cork city in response to a speech that was made to police officers of Listowel who had refused orders to move into the more urban areas, in which he stated "you may make mistakes occasionally, and innocent persons may be shot, but that cannot be helped.


  • Ireland
    Monday Aug 9, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    British Parliament passed the Restoration of Order in Ireland Act

    Ireland
    Monday Aug 9, 1920

    On 9 August 1920, the British Parliament passed the Restoration of Order in Ireland Act. It replaced the trial by jury by courts-martial by regulation for those areas where IRA activity was prevalent.


  • Ireland
    Monday Nov 1, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    Twenty-four men were executed by the British

    Ireland
    Monday Nov 1, 1920

    Between 1 November 1920 and 7 June 1921 twenty-four men were executed by the British.


  • Dublin, Ireland
    Sunday Nov 21, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    There was a day of dramatic bloodshed in Dublin

    Dublin, Ireland
    Sunday Nov 21, 1920

    Then, on 21 November 1920, there was a day of dramatic bloodshed in Dublin. In the early morning, Collins' Squad attempted to wipe out the leading British intelligence operatives in the capital. The Squad shot 19 people, killing 14 and wounding 5. These consisted of British Army officers, police officers and civilians. The dead included members of the Cairo Gang and a courts-martial officer, and were killed at different places around Dublin.


  • Cork, Ireland
    Sunday Nov 21, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    Bloody Sunday

    Cork, Ireland
    Sunday Nov 21, 1920

    About 300 people had been killed by late 1920, but the conflict escalated in November. On Bloody Sunday in Dublin, 21 November 1920, fourteen British intelligence operatives were assassinated in the morning; then in the afternoon the RIC opened fire on a crowd at a Gaelic football match, killing fourteen civilians and wounding 65. A week later, seventeen Auxiliaries were killed by the IRA in the Kilmichael Ambush in County Cork.


  • Cork, Ireland
    Sunday Nov 28, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    Ambushed a patrol of Auxiliaries

    Cork, Ireland
    Sunday Nov 28, 1920

    On 28 November 1920, only a week after Bloody Sunday in Dublin, the west Cork unit of the IRA, under Tom Barry, ambushed a patrol of Auxiliaries at Kilmichael in County Cork, killing all but one of the 18-man patrol.


  • Cork, Ireland
    Friday Dec 10, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    Martial law was proclaimed in Counties Cork

    Cork, Ireland
    Friday Dec 10, 1920

    On 10 December 1920, martial law was proclaimed in Counties Cork, Kerry, Limerick and Tipperary in Munster; in January 1921 martial law was extended to the rest of Munster in Counties Clare and Waterford, as well as Counties Kilkenny and Wexford in Leinster.


  • Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Dec 11, 1920

    Irish War of Independence

    IRA ambush in the city

    Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Dec 11, 1920

    On 11 December, the centre of Cork City was burnt out by the Black and Tans, who then shot at firefighters trying to tackle the blaze, in reprisal for an IRA ambush in the city on 11 December 1920 which killed one Auxiliary and wounded eleven.


  • Ireland
    Tuesday Feb 1, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    The First execution under martial law of an IRA man took place

    Ireland
    Tuesday Feb 1, 1921

    On 1 February, the first execution under martial law of an IRA man took place. Cornelius Murphy of Millstreet, Cork was shot in Cork city.


  • Ireland
    Friday Mar 11, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    State of war with England

    Ireland
    Friday Mar 11, 1921

    on 11 March, Dáil Éireann President Éamon de Valera called for acceptance of a "state of war with England". The Dail voted unanimously to empower him to declare war whenever he saw fit, but he did not formally do so.


  • Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Mar 19, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    Crossbarry Ambush

    Cork, Ireland
    Saturday Mar 19, 1921

    On 19 March 1921, Tom Barry's 100-strong West Cork IRA unit fought an action against 1,200 British troops – the Crossbarry Ambush. Barry's men narrowly avoided being trapped by converging British columns and inflicted between ten and thirty killed on the British side.


  • Kerry, Ireland
    Monday Mar 21, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    Train at the Headford junction

    Kerry, Ireland
    Monday Mar 21, 1921

    On 21 March, the Kerry IRA attacked a train at the Headford junction near Killarney.


  • Ireland
    Friday May 13, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    General election for the Parliament of Southern Ireland

    Ireland
    Friday May 13, 1921

    A general election for the Parliament of Southern Ireland was held on 13 May. Sinn Féin won 124 of the new parliament's 128 seats unopposed, but its elected members refused to take their seats.


  • Ireland
    Friday May 13, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    The failure of the British efforts to put down the guerrillas was illustrated

    Ireland
    Friday May 13, 1921

    The failure of the British efforts to put down the guerrillas was illustrated by the events of "Black Whitsun" on 13–15 May 1921.


  • Dublin, Ireland
    Wednesday May 25, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    Several hundred IRA men from the Dublin Brigade occupied and burned the Custom House

    Dublin, Ireland
    Wednesday May 25, 1921

    The biggest single loss for the IRA, however, came in Dublin. On 25 May 1921, several hundred IRA men from the Dublin Brigade occupied and burned the Custom House (the center of local government in Ireland) in Dublin city center. Symbolically, this was intended to show that British rule in Ireland was untenable. However, from a military point of view, it was a heavy defeat in which five IRA men were killed and over eighty captured.


  • Ireland
    Monday Jun 6, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    The British made their first conciliatory gesture, calling off the policy of house burnings as reprisals

    Ireland
    Monday Jun 6, 1921

    On 6 June 1921, the British made their first conciliatory gesture, calling off the policy of house burnings as reprisals. On the other side, IRA leaders and in particular Michael Collins, felt that the IRA as it was then organized could not continue indefinitely. It had been hard-pressed by the deployment of more regular British soldiers to Ireland and by the lack of arms and ammunition.


  • Ireland
    Friday Jun 24, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    The Chosen leader of the great majority in Southern Ireland

    Ireland
    Friday Jun 24, 1921

    Seizing the momentum, Lloyd George wrote to Éamon de Valera as "the chosen leader of the great majority in Southern Ireland" on 24 June, suggesting a conference.


  • Ireland
    Friday Jun 24, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    British Coalition Government's Cabinet decided to propose talks with the leader of Sinn Féin

    Ireland
    Friday Jun 24, 1921

    On 24 June 1921, the British Coalition Government's Cabinet decided to propose talks with the leader of Sinn Féin. Coalition Liberals and Unionists agreed that an offer to negotiate would strengthen the Government's position if Sinn Féin refused.


  • Ireland
    Monday Jul 11, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    Fighting in the south was largely ended by the Truce

    Ireland
    Monday Jul 11, 1921

    While the fighting in the south was largely ended by the Truce on 11 July 1921, in the north killings continued and actually escalated until the summer of 1922.


  • Ireland
    Monday Jul 11, 1921

    Irish War of Independence

    War of independence in Ireland ended

    Ireland
    Monday Jul 11, 1921

    The war of independence in Ireland ended with a truce on 11 July 1921.


  • Ireland
    Saturday Jan 7, 1922

    Irish War of Independence

    Anglo-Irish Treaty was then ratified in triplicate

    Ireland
    Saturday Jan 7, 1922

    Anglo-Irish Treaty was then ratified in triplicate: by Dáil Éireann on 7 January 1922.


  • Clonmel, Ireland
    Saturday Feb 18, 1922

    Irish War of Independence

    Ernie O'Malley's IRA unit raided the RIC barracks at Clonmel

    Clonmel, Ireland
    Saturday Feb 18, 1922

    On 18 February 1922, Ernie O'Malley's IRA unit raided the RIC barracks at Clonmel, taking 40 policemen prisoner and seizing over 600 weapons and thousands of rounds of ammunition.


  • Ireland
    Saturday Jun 17, 1922

    Irish War of Independence

    Revenge

    Ireland
    Saturday Jun 17, 1922

    On 17 June, in revenge for the killing of two Catholics by the B-Specials, Frank Aiken's IRA unit shot ten Protestant civilians, killing six in and around Altnaveigh, south Armagh. Three Special Constables were also killed in the shootings.


  • Ireland
    Thursday Oct 5, 1922

    Irish War of Independence

    Last reported killing of the conflict

    Ireland
    Thursday Oct 5, 1922

    The violence in the north fizzled out by late 1922, the last reported killing of the conflict in what was now Northern Ireland took place on 5 October.


  • Ireland
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1922

    Irish War of Independence

    First internationally recognized head of an independent Irish government

    Ireland
    Wednesday Dec 6, 1922

    On 6 December 1922, following the coming into legal existence of the Irish Free State, W. T. Cosgrave became President of the Executive Council, the first internationally recognized head of an independent Irish government.


  • Ireland
    Friday Dec 8, 1922

    Irish War of Independence

    The Free State if it wished, which it duly did

    Ireland
    Friday Dec 8, 1922

    The Free State if it wished, which it duly did on 8 December 1922 under the procedures laid down.


  • Ireland
    Thursday Mar 17, 1927

    St. Patrick's Day

    Selling alcohol ban

    Ireland
    Thursday Mar 17, 1927

    In 1927, the Irish Free State government banned the selling of alcohol on St Patrick's Day, although it remained legal in Northern Ireland. The ban was not repealed until 1961.


  • Dublin Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 1931

    St. Patrick's Day

    First official, state-sponsored St Patrick's Day parade

    Dublin Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 1931

    The first official, state-sponsored St Patrick's Day parade in Dublin took place in 1931.


  • Ireland
    Sunday Mar 17, 1940

    St. Patrick's Day

    Holy week concurrence

    Ireland
    Sunday Mar 17, 1940

    The church calendar avoids the observance of saints' feasts during certain solemnities, moving the saint's day to a time outside those periods. St Patrick's Day is occasionally affected by this requirement, when 17 March falls during Holy Week. This happened in 1940 when Saint Patrick's Day was observed on 3 April to avoid it coinciding with Palm Sunday, and again in 2008, where it was officially observed on 15 March. St Patrick's Day will not fall within Holy Week again until 2160. However, the popular festivities may still be held on 17 March or on a weekend near to the feast day.


  • Near Watervill, Ireland
    Sunday Jun 23, 1985

    Plane Accidents

    Air India Flight 182

    Near Watervill, Ireland
    Sunday Jun 23, 1985

    Air India Flight 182, a Boeing 747-237B, crashed off the southwest coast of Ireland on June 23, 1985, when a bomb exploded in the cargo hold. All 307 passengers and 22 crew members died. One passenger had checked in as "M. Singh". Singh did not board the flight. His suitcase containing the bomb was loaded onto the plane, however. "Mr. Singh" was never identified or captured. It was later determined Sikh extremists were behind the bombing as a retaliation for the Indian government's attack on the Golden Temple in the city of Amritsar, which is very important for the Sikhs. This was, at the time, the deadliest terrorist attack involving an airplane.


  • Ireland
    Sunday Mar 17, 1996

    St. Patrick's Day

    St Patrick's Festival

    Ireland
    Sunday Mar 17, 1996

    The first St Patrick's Festival was held on 17 March 1996. In 1997, it became a three-day event, and by 2000 it was a four-day event. By 2006, the festival was five days long; more than 675,000 people attended the 2009 parade. Overall 2009's five-day festival saw almost 1 million visitors, who took part in festivities that included concerts, outdoor theatre performances, and fireworks. The Skyfest which ran from 2006 to 2012 formed the centerpiece of the St Patrick's festival.


  • Ireland
    Saturday Mar 17, 2001

    St. Patrick's Day

    First canceling

    Ireland
    Saturday Mar 17, 2001

    On two occasions, parades across the Republic of Ireland have been canceled from taking place on St Patrick´s Day, with both years involving health and safety reasons. In 2001, as a precaution to the foot-and-mouth outbreak, St Patrick´s Day celebrations were postponed to May


  • Dublin, Ireland
    Monday May 10, 2010

    League of Legends

    European HQ

    Dublin, Ireland
    Monday May 10, 2010

    In Europe, Riot Games initially signed an international licensing partnership with GOA, the video games department of Orange's Content Division, and Europe's largest gaming portal. On October 13, 2009, GOA and Riot announced that they would start channeling server access for players located in Europe to GOA's dedicated servers. This partnership did not last; on May 10, 2010, Riot Games announced that they would take over the distribution and operation of the game in Europe. To do so, Riot Games established a European HQ in Dublin.


  • United Kingdom and Ireland
    Friday Aug 31, 2012

    Frederick Douglass

    Historical plaques were installed on buildings

    United Kingdom and Ireland
    Friday Aug 31, 2012

    In the 21st century, historical plaques were installed on buildings in Cork and Waterford, Ireland, and London to celebrate Douglass's visit: the first is on the Imperial Hotel in Cork and was unveiled on August 31, 2012; the second is on the facade of Waterford City Hall and was unveiled on October 7, 2013. It commemorates his speech there on October 9, 1845. The third plaque adorns Nell Gwynn House, South Kensington in London, where Douglass stayed with the British abolitionist George Thompson. A plaque on Gilmore Place in Edinburgh marks his stay there in 1846.


  • Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 2020

    St. Patrick's Day

    Second cancelling

    Ireland
    Tuesday Mar 17, 2020

    In 2020, as a consequence of the severity of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, the St Patrick´s Day Parade was canceled outright.


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