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  • Shimabara Peninsula of Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
    Tuesday May 21, 1782

    1792 Unzen earthquake and tsunami

    Two large earthquakes were followed by a collapse of the eastern flank of Mount Unzen's Mayuyama dome

    Shimabara Peninsula of Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
    Tuesday May 21, 1782

    On the night of 21 May, two large earthquakes were followed by a collapse of the eastern flank of Mount Unzen's Mayuyama dome, causing a landslide which swept through the city of Shimabara and into Ariake Bay, triggering a great tsunami.




  • Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
    Monday May 21, 1792

    Disasters with highest death tolls

    1792 Unzen Earthquake and Tsunami

    Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
    Monday May 21, 1792

    The 1792 Unzen earthquake and tsunami resulted from the volcanic activities of Mount Unzen (in the Shimabara Peninsula of Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan) on 21 May. This caused the collapse of the southern flank of the Mayuyama dome in front of Mount Unzen, resulting in a tremendous megatsunami, killing 15,000 people altogether.




  • Kyoto, Japan
    Sunday Sep 22, 1889

    Nintendo

    Nintendo Foundation

    Kyoto, Japan
    Sunday Sep 22, 1889

    Nintendo was founded as a playing card company by Fusajiro Yamauchi on 23 September 1889. Based in Kyoto, the business produced and marketed hanafuda cards. The handmade cards soon became popular, and Yamauchi hired assistants to mass-produce cards to satisfy demand.




  • Japan
    Saturday Jun 16, 1894

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Discuss The Future Status of Korea

    Japan
    Saturday Jun 16, 1894

    Japanese foreign minister Mutsu Munemitsu meets with Wang Fengzao, the Qing ambassador to Japan, to discuss the future status of Korea. Wang states that the Qing government intends to pull out of Korea after the rebellion has been suppressed and expects Japan to do the same. However, China retains a resident to look after Chinese primacy in Korea.




  • Japan
    Thursday Jul 19, 1894

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Establishment of The Japanese Combined Fleet

    Japan
    Thursday Jul 19, 1894

    Establishment of the Japanese Combined Fleet, consisting of almost all vessels in the Imperial Japanese Navy. Mutsu cables Ōtori to take any necessary steps to compel the Korean government to carry out a reform program.




  • Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Wednesday Mar 6, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Starting Preparations For The Capture of Taiwan

    Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Wednesday Mar 6, 1895

    the Japanese had begun preparations for the capture of Taiwan. However, the first operation would be directed not against the island itself, but against the Pescadores Islands, which due to their strategic position off the west coast would become a stepping stone for further operations against the island. On March 6, a Japanese expeditionary force consisting of a reinforced infantry regiment with 2,800 troops and an artillery battery were embarked on five transports, sailed from Ujina to Sasebo, arriving there three days later.




  • Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Friday Mar 15, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    Leaving Sasebo Heading To The Pescadores

    Sasebo, Nagasaki, Japan
    Friday Mar 15, 1895

    On March 15, the five transports were escorted by seven cruisers and five torpedo boats of the 4th Flotilla, left Sasebo heading south to the Pescadores .


  • Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi, Japan
    Tuesday Apr 16, 1895

    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Treaty of Shimonoseki

    Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi, Japan
    Tuesday Apr 16, 1895

    The Treaty of Shimonoseki was signed on 17 April 1895. The Qing Empire recognized the total independence of Korea and ceded the Liaodong Peninsula, Taiwan and Penghu Islands to Japan "in perpetuity".


  • Osaka, Japan
    Sunday Jun 11, 1899

    Yasunari Kawabata

    Birth

    Osaka, Japan
    Sunday Jun 11, 1899

    On 11 June 1899, Yasunari Kawabata was born into a well-established family in Osaka, Japan.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Apr 29, 1901

    Hirohito

    Born

    Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Apr 29, 1901

    Born in Tokyo's Aoyama Palace (during the reign of his grandfather, Emperor Meiji) on 29 April 1901, Hirohito was the first son of 21-year-old Crown Prince Yoshihito (the future Emperor Taishō) and 17-year-old Crown Princess Sadako (the future Empress Teimei). He was the grandson of Emperor Meiji and Yanagihara Naruko. His childhood title was Prince Michi.


  • Tsushima, Japan (Then China)
    Saturday May 27, 1905

    1905 Russian Revolution

    Russian Baltic Fleet was defeated

    Tsushima, Japan (Then China)
    Saturday May 27, 1905

    On 27–28 May 1905, the Russian Baltic Fleet was defeated at Tsushima.


  • Tokyo, China
    Sunday Aug 20, 1905

    Xinhai Revolution

    Tongmenghui (United League)

    Tokyo, China
    Sunday Aug 20, 1905

    Sun Yat-sen successfully united the Revive China Society, Huaxinghui and Guangfuhui in the summer of 1905, thereby establishing the unified Tongmenghui (United League) in August 1905 in Tokyo.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Jul 30, 1912

    Hirohito

    Hirohito became the Heir Apparent

    Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Jul 30, 1912

    When his grandfather, Emperor Meiji, died on 30 July 1912, Hirohito's father, Yoshihito, assumed the throne, and Hirohito became the heir apparent. At the same time, he was formally commissioned in both the army and navy as a second lieutenant and ensign, respectively, and was also decorated with the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Chrysanthemum.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Nov 2, 1916

    Hirohito

    Hirohito was formally proclaimed Crown Prince and Heir Apparent

    Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Nov 2, 1916

    Hirohito was formally proclaimed Crown Prince and heir apparent on 2 November 1916; but an investiture ceremony was not strictly necessary to confirm this status as heir to the throne.


  • Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
    Wednesday Jan 26, 1921

    Akio Morita

    Born

    Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
    Wednesday Jan 26, 1921

    Akio Morita was born on January 26, 1921, in Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Nov 29, 1921

    Hirohito

    Hirohito became Regent of Japan

    Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Nov 29, 1921

    Hirohito became Regent of Japan (Sesshō) on 29 November 1921, in place of his ailing father who was affected by a mental illness.


  • Ōdate, Akita Prefecture, Japan
    Saturday Nov 10, 1923

    Hachikō

    Birth

    Ōdate, Akita Prefecture, Japan
    Saturday Nov 10, 1923

    Hachiko, a golden brown Akita, was born on November 10, 1923, at a farm located in Ōdate, Akita Prefecture, Japan.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Dec 27, 1923

    Hirohito

    Daisuke Namba attempted to assassinate Hirohito

    Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Dec 27, 1923

    On 27 December 1923, Daisuke Namba attempted to assassinate Hirohito in the Toranomon Incident but his attempt failed. During interrogation, he claimed to be a communist and was executed, but some have suggested that he was in contact with the Nagacho faction in the Army.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Jan 26, 1924

    Hirohito

    Marriage

    Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Jan 26, 1924

    Prince Hirohito married his distant cousin Princess Nagako Kuni (the future Empress Kōjun), the eldest daughter of Prince Kuniyoshi Kuni, on 26 January 1924. They had two sons and five daughters.


  • Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday May 21, 1925

    Hachikō

    The professor's Death

    Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday May 21, 1925

    Ueno would commute daily to work, and Hachikō would leave the house to greet him at the end of each day at the nearby Shibuya Station. The pair continued the daily routine until May 21, 1925, when Ueno did not return. The professor had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage, while he was giving a lecture to his class, and died without ever returning to the train station in which Hachikō waited.


  • Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Friday May 22, 1925

    Hachikō

    The Wait Starts

    Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Friday May 22, 1925

    Each day, for the next nine years, nine months and fifteen days, Hachikō awaited Ueno's return, appearing precisely when the train was due at the station.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Dec 25, 1926

    Hirohito

    Hirohito assumed the Throne

    Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Dec 25, 1926

    On 25 December 1926, Hirohito assumed the throne upon the death of his father, Yoshihito. The Crown Prince was said to have received the succession (senso).


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Aug 5, 1931

    Hirohito

    The Deputy Minister of the Japanese Army instructed not to use the term "prisoners of war" for Chinese captives

    Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Aug 5, 1931

    According to Akira Fujiwara, Hirohito endorsed the policy of qualifying the invasion of China as an "incident" instead of a "war"; therefore, he did not issue any notice to observe international law in this conflict (unlike what his predecessors did in previous conflicts officially recognized by Japan as wars), and the Deputy Minister of the Japanese Army instructed the Chief of staff of Japanese China Garrison Army on August 5 not to use the term "prisoners of war" for Chinese captives. This instruction led to the removal of the constraints of international law on the treatment of Chinese prisoners. The works of Yoshiaki Yoshimi and Seiya Matsuno show that the Emperor also authorized, by specific orders (rinsanmei), the use of chemical weapons against the Chinese.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Jan 9, 1932

    Hirohito

    The Sakuradamon Incident

    Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Jan 9, 1932

    Hirohito narrowly escaped assassination by a hand grenade thrown by a Korean independence activist, Lee Bong-chang, in Tokyo on 9 January 1932, in the Sakuradamon Incident.


  • Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Oct 4, 1932

    Hachikō

    The First Article

    Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Oct 4, 1932

    Hachikō attracted the attention of other commuters. Many of the people who frequented the Shibuya train station had seen Hachikō and Professor Ueno together each day. Initial reactions from the people, especially from those working at the station, were not necessarily friendly. However, after the first appearance of the article about him in Asahi Shimbun on October 4, 1932, people started to bring Hachikō treats and food to nourish him during his wait.


  • Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Friday Mar 8, 1935

    Hachikō

    Hachikō's Death

    Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Friday Mar 8, 1935

    Hachikō died on March 8, 1935, at the age of 11. He was found on a street in Shibuya.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Feb 26, 1936

    Hirohito

    The February 26 Incident

    Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Feb 26, 1936

    The assassination of moderate Prime Minister was followed by an attempted military coup in February 1936, the February 26 incident, mounted by junior Army officers of the Kōdōha faction who had the sympathy of many high-ranking officers including Prince Chichibu (Yasuhito), one of the Emperor's brothers. This revolt was occasioned by a loss of political support by the militarist faction in Diet elections. The coup resulted in the murders of a number of high government and Army officials.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Feb 29, 1936

    Hirohito

    The February 26 Rebellion was suppressed

    Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Feb 29, 1936

    When Chief Aide-de-camp Shigeru Honjō informed him of the revolt, the Emperor immediately ordered that it be put down and referred to the officers as "rebels" (bōto). Shortly thereafter, he ordered Army Minister Yoshiyuki Kawashima to suppress the rebellion within the hour, and he asked reports from Honjō every 30 minutes. The next day, when told by Honjō that little progress was being made by the high command in quashing the rebels, the Emperor told him "I Myself, will lead the Konoe Division and subdue them." The rebellion was suppressed following his orders on 29 February.


  • Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Sunday Mar 8, 1936

    Hachikō

    Annual ceremony

    Shibuya Station, Tokyo, Japan
    Sunday Mar 8, 1936

    Each year on March 8, Hachikō's devotion is honored with a solemn ceremony of remembrance at Tokyo's Shibuya railroad station. Hundreds of dog lovers often turn out to honor his memory and loyalty.


  • Japan
    Wednesday Nov 20, 1940

    World War II

    Final offer

    Japan
    Wednesday Nov 20, 1940

    On 20 November, a new government under Hideki Tojo presented an interim proposal as its final offer. It called for the end of American aid to China and for lifting the embargo on the supply of oil and other resources to Japan. In exchange, Japan promised not to launch any attacks in Southeast Asia and to withdraw its forces from southern Indochina.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Sep 4, 1941

    Hirohito

    The Japanese Cabinet Meeting

    Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Sep 4, 1941

    On September 4, 1941, the Japanese Cabinet met to consider war plans prepared by Imperial General Headquarters.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Friday Sep 5, 1941

    Hirohito

    Prime Minister Submitted a draft of the Decision To The Emperor

    Tokyo, Japan
    Friday Sep 5, 1941

    On September 5, Prime Minister Konoe informally submitted a draft of the decision to the Emperor, just one day in advance of the Imperial Conference at which it would be formally implemented.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Oct 16, 1941

    Hirohito

    Prime Minister Fumimaro Konoe gave his Resignation

    Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Oct 16, 1941

    As war preparations continued, Prime Minister Fumimaro Konoe found himself more and more isolated and gave his resignation on October 16.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Sunday Nov 2, 1941

    Hirohito

    The review of Eleven points

    Tokyo, Japan
    Sunday Nov 2, 1941

    On November 2 Tōjō, Sugiyama, and Nagano reported to the Emperor that the review of eleven points had been in vain. Emperor Hirohito gave his consent to the war and then asked: "Are you going to provide justification for the war?" The decision for war against the United States was presented for approval to Hirohito by General Tōjō, Naval Minister Admiral Shigetarō Shimada, and Japanese Foreign Minister Shigenori Tōgō.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Nov 3, 1941

    Hirohito

    Nagano explained the Plan to the Emperor

    Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Nov 3, 1941

    On November 3, Nagano explained in detail the plan of the attack on Pearl Harbor to the Emperor.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Nov 5, 1941

    Hirohito

    Emperor Hirohito approved The Operations Plan

    Tokyo, Japan
    Wednesday Nov 5, 1941

    On November 5 Emperor Hirohito approved in imperial conference the operations plan for a war against the Occident and had many meetings with the military and Tōjō until the end of the month.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Dec 1, 1941

    Hirohito

    Imperial Conference Sanctioned The War

    Tokyo, Japan
    Monday Dec 1, 1941

    On December 1 an Imperial Conference sanctioned the "War against the United States, United Kingdom and the Kingdom of the Netherlands."


  • Japan
    Monday Dec 8, 1941

    World War II

    Japanese declaration of war on the United States and the British Empire

    Japan
    Monday Dec 8, 1941

    The declaration of war by the Empire of Japan on the United States and the British Empire was published on December 8, 1941 (Japan time; December 7 in the United States).


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Jan 13, 1942

    Hirohito

    The Emperor pressed Sugiyama four times to launch an Attack on Bataan

    Tokyo, Japan
    Tuesday Jan 13, 1942

    The Emperor made major interventions in some military operations. For example, he pressed Sugiyama four times, on January 13 and 21 and February 9 and 26, to increase troop strength and launch an attack on Bataan.


  • Greater Tokyo Area, Japan
    Saturday Apr 18, 1942

    World War II

    Doolittle Raid

    Greater Tokyo Area, Japan
    Saturday Apr 18, 1942

    The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, was an air raid on 18 April 1942 by the United States on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other places on Honshu. It was the first air operation to strike the Japanese archipelago. It demonstrated that the Japanese mainland was vulnerable to American air attack, served as retaliation for the attack on Pearl Harbor. The raid caused negligible material damage to Japan, but it had major psychological effects. In the United States, it raised morale. In Japan, it raised doubt about the ability of military leaders to defend the home islands, but the bombing and strafing of civilians also steeled Japanese resolve to gain retribution, and this was exploited for propaganda purposes.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Sep 11, 1943

    Hirohito

    The Emperor response on the American advance through the Solomon Islands

    Tokyo, Japan
    Saturday Sep 11, 1943

    On September 11 the Emperor ordered Sugiyama to work with the Navy to implement better military preparation and give adequate supply to soldiers fighting in Rabaul.


  • Japan
    Saturday Jul 22, 1944

    World War II

    Hideki Tojo resignation

    Japan
    Saturday Jul 22, 1944

    The Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo has resigned on 22 July 1944.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Mar 8, 1945

    World War II

    Bombing of Tokyo

    Tokyo, Japan
    Thursday Mar 8, 1945

    A devastating bombing raid on Tokyo of 9–10 March was the deadliest conventional bombing raid in history.


  • Japan
    Wednesday Apr 18, 1945

    World War II

    Air raids on Japan

    Japan
    Wednesday Apr 18, 1945

    United States Army Air Forces launched a massive firebombing campaign of strategic cities in Japan in an effort to destroy Japanese war industry and civilian morale.


  • Okinawa, Japan
    Sunday May 6, 1945

    Desmond Doss: Hacksaw Ridge

    One more

    Okinawa, Japan
    Sunday May 6, 1945

    Doss said frequently after saving a wounded soldier: "help me get one more". This phrase motivated him to keep searching for soldiers


  • Okinawa, Japan
    Monday May 21, 1945

    Desmond Doss: Hacksaw Ridge

    Being Wounded

    Okinawa, Japan
    Monday May 21, 1945

    Doss was wounded four times in Okinawa and was evacuated on May 21, 1945, aboard the USS Mercy. Doss suffered a left arm fracture from a sniper's bullet and at one point had seventeen pieces of shrapnel embedded in his body. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in Okinawa.


  • Japan
    Monday Aug 6, 1945

    World War II

    Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Japan
    Monday Aug 6, 1945

    The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 and 9 August 1945.


  • Nagasaki, Japan
    Thursday Aug 9, 1945

    Atomic Bomb

    The Second Time To Use Nuclear Weapons In War

    Nagasaki, Japan
    Thursday Aug 9, 1945

    On August 9, the U.S. Army Air Forces detonated a plutonium implosion-type fission bomb nicknamed "Fat Man" over the Japanese city of Nagasaki.


  • Japan
    Thursday Aug 9, 1945

    Korean War

    Soviet Union declared war on Japan

    Japan
    Thursday Aug 9, 1945

    Soviet Union declared war on Japan on 9 August 1945, three days after the USA atomic bombing of Hiroshima.


  • Japan
    Friday Aug 10, 1945

    Harry S. Truman

    Japan agreed to surrender

    Japan
    Friday Aug 10, 1945

    Japan agreed to surrender the following day.


  • Tokyo, Japan
    Friday Aug 10, 1945

    Hirohito

    The Cabinet drafted an "Imperial Rescript Ending The War"

    Tokyo, Japan
    Friday Aug 10, 1945

    Everything changed after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Soviet declaration of war. And on August 10, the cabinet drafted an "Imperial Rescript ending the War" following the Emperor's indications that the declaration did not compromise any demand which prejudiced the prerogatives of His Majesty as a Sovereign Ruler.


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