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  • Kim Liên, Nam Đàn District, Nghe An, Vietnam
    Monday May 19, 1890

    Born

    Kim Liên, Nam Đàn District, Nghe An, Vietnam
    Monday May 19, 1890

    Hồ Chí Minh was born as Nguyễn Sinh Cung in 1890 in the village of Hoàng Trù, his mother's village.




  • Vietnam
    Monday Jun 5, 1911

    Working on a French Steamer

    Vietnam
    Monday Jun 5, 1911

    He worked as a kitchen helper on a French steamer, the Amiral de Latouche-Tréville while using the alias Văn Ba.




  • Marseille, France
    Wednesday Jul 5, 1911

    The Steamer arrived In Marseille

    Marseille, France
    Wednesday Jul 5, 1911

    The steamer departed on 5 June 1911 and arrived in Marseille, France on 5 July 1911. The ship then left for Le Havre and Dunkirk, returning to Marseille in mid-September. There, he applied for the French Colonial Administrative School, but his application was rejected and he instead decided to begin traveling the world by working on ships and visited many countries from 1911 to 1917.




  • New York, U.S.
    1912

    Thành (Ho) traveled to The United States

    New York, U.S.
    1912

    While working as the cook's helper on a ship in 1912, Thành (Ho) traveled to the United States. From 1912 to 1913, he may have lived in New York City (Harlem) and Boston, where he claimed to have worked as a baker at the Parker House Hotel.




  • Paris, France
    Jun, 1919

    Arriving in Paris

    Paris, France
    Jun, 1919

    From 1919 to 1923, Thành (Ho) began to show an interest in politics while living in France, being influenced by his friend and Socialist Party of France comrade Marcel Cachin. Thành claimed to have arrived in Paris from London in 1917, but the French police only had documents recording his arrival in June 1919.




  • Paris, France
    Dec, 1920

    Quốc (Ho) became a Representative To The Congress of Tours of The Socialist Party of France

    Paris, France
    Dec, 1920

    In December 1920, Quốc (Ho) became a representative to the Congress of Tours of the Socialist Party of France, voted for the Third International and was a founding member of the French Communist Party. Taking a position in the Colonial Committee of the party, he tried to draw his comrades' attention towards people in French colonies including Indochina, but his efforts were often unsuccessful.




  • Paris, France
    May, 1922

    Criticizing The Use of English Words by French Sportswriters

    Paris, France
    May, 1922

    He began to write journal articles and short stories as well as running his Vietnamese nationalist group. In May 1922, he wrote an article for a French magazine criticizing the use of English words by French sportswriters.


  • Moscow, U.S.S.R.
    1923

    Quốc (Ho) left Paris for Moscow

    Moscow, U.S.S.R.
    1923

    In 1923, Quốc (Ho) left Paris for Moscow carrying a passport with the name Chen Vang, a Chinese merchant, where he was employed by the Comintern, studied at the Communist University of the Toilers of the East.


  • Russia
    Jun, 1924

    Participating In The Fifth Comintern Congress

    Russia
    Jun, 1924

    Quốc (Ho) participated in the Fifth Comintern Congress in June 1924.


  • Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    Nov, 1924

    Arriving In Canton (present-day Guangzhou)

    Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    Nov, 1924

    Quốc (Ho) arrived in Canton (present-day Guangzhou), China in November 1924 using the name Ly Thuy.


  • Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    1925

    Ho organized "Youth Education Classes"

    Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    1925

    In 1925–1926, he organized "Youth Education Classes" and occasionally gave socialist lectures to Vietnamese revolutionary young people living in Canton at the Whampoa Military Academy. These young people would become the seeds of a new revolutionary, pro-communist movement in Vietnam several years later. According to William Duiker.


  • China
    Monday Oct 18, 1926

    Marriage

    China
    Monday Oct 18, 1926

    He lived with a Chinese woman, Zeng Xueming (Tăng Tuyết Minh), whom he married on 18 October 1926.


  • Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    Apr, 1927

    Quốc (Ho) left Canton

    Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
    Apr, 1927

    After Chiang Kai-shek's 1927 anti-Communist coup, Quốc (Ho) left Canton again in April 1927 and returned to Moscow, spending part of the summer of 1927 recuperating from tuberculosis in Crimea.


  • Paris, France
    Nov, 1927

    Returning to Paris

    Paris, France
    Nov, 1927

    Quốc (Ho) returned to Paris once more in November 1927.


  • Bangkok, Thailand
    Jul, 1928

    Returning to Asia

    Bangkok, Thailand
    Jul, 1928

    Ho returned to Asia by way of Brussels, Berlin, Switzerland and Italy, where he sailed to Bangkok, Thailand, arriving in July 1928.


  • Thailand
    1929

    Leaving Thailand

    Thailand
    1929

    Quốc (Ho) remained in Thailand, staying in the Thai village of Nachok until late 1929, when he moved on to India and then Shanghai.


  • Hong Kong
    1930

    Chairing a meeting with representatives from two Vietnamese Communist Parties

    Hong Kong
    1930

    In Hong Kong in early 1930, he chaired a meeting with representatives from two Vietnamese Communist parties in order to merge them into a unified organization, the Communist Party of Vietnam.


  • Hong Kong
    Jun, 1931

    Quốc (Ho) was arrested

    Hong Kong
    Jun, 1931

    In June 1931, he was arrested in Hong Kong.


  • Hong Kong
    1932

    Quốc (Ho) was Reported as Dead

    Hong Kong
    1932

    To reduce French pressure for extradition of Quốc (Ho), he was reported as dead in 1932.


  • Moscow, Soviet Union
    Jan, 1933

    The British quietly released him

    Moscow, Soviet Union
    Jan, 1933

    The British quietly released him in January 1933. He moved to the Soviet Union and in Moscow studied and taught at the Lenin Institute.


  • Vietnam
    Sunday Mar 31, 1935

    Member of the Politburo

    Vietnam
    Sunday Mar 31, 1935

    On 31 March 1935, Hồ Chí Minh became Member of the Politburo


  • China
    1938

    Returning to China

    China
    1938

    In 1938, Quốc (Ho) returned to China and served as an advisor to the Chinese Communist armed forces. He was also the senior Comintern agent in charge of Asian affairs.


  • China
    1940

    He began regularly using the name Hồ Chí Minh

    China
    1940

    Around 1940, he began regularly using the name Hồ Chí Minh, a Vietnamese name combining a common Vietnamese surname (Hồ, 胡) with a given name meaning "He Who has been enlightened" .


  • Vietnam
    1941

    Returning to Vietnam

    Vietnam
    1941

    In 1941, Hồ Chí Minh returned to Vietnam to lead the Việt Minh independence movement.


  • Vietnam
    Apr, 1945

    Ho met with the OSS agent Archimedes Patti

    Vietnam
    Apr, 1945

    In April 1945, he met with the OSS agent Archimedes Patti and offered to provide intelligence to the allies provided that he could have "a line of communication with the allie". The OSS agreed to this and later sent a military team of OSS members to train his men and Hồ Chí Minh himself was treated for malaria and dysentery by an OSS doctor.


  • Vietnam
    Tuesday Aug 14, 1945

    August Revolution (1945)

    Vietnam
    Tuesday Aug 14, 1945

    Ho Chi Minh's Việt Minh (League for the Independence of Vietnam) launched revolution against French colonial rule in Vietnam, on August 14, 1945.


  • Hanoi, Vietnam
    Sep, 1945

    A Force of 200,000 Republic of China Army Troops arrived in Hanoi

    Hanoi, Vietnam
    Sep, 1945

    In September 1945, a force of 200,000 Republic of China Army troops arrived in Hanoi to accept the surrender of the Japanese occupiers in northern Indochina.


  • Vietnam
    Sunday Sep 2, 1945

    1st President of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam

    Vietnam
    Sunday Sep 2, 1945

    After the August Revolution, Ho Chi Minh became the 1st President of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam


  • Vietnam
    Sunday Sep 2, 1945

    Hồ Chí Minh read the Declaration of Independence of Vietnam

    Vietnam
    Sunday Sep 2, 1945

    Following Emperor Bảo Đại's abdication on 2 September 1945, Hồ Chí Minh read the Declaration of Independence of Vietnam under the name of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam.


  • Vietnam
    Sunday Sep 2, 1945

    1st Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam

    Vietnam
    Sunday Sep 2, 1945

    Following the August Revolution (1945) organized by the Việt Minh, Hồ Chí Minh became Chairman of the Provisional Government (Premier of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam) and issued a Proclamation of Independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam.


  • Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Monday Sep 24, 1945

    The call for a General Strike

    Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Monday Sep 24, 1945

    In Saigon, with violence between rival Vietnamese factions and French forces increasing, the British commander, General Sir Douglas Gracey, declared martial law. On 24 September, the Việt Minh leaders responded with a call for a general strike.


  • Vietnam
    1946

    The Democratic Republic of Vietnam government found that war was Inevitable

    Vietnam
    1946

    In the final days of 1946, after a year of diplomatic failure and many concessions in agreements, such as the Dalat and Fontainebleau conferences, the Democratic Republic of Vietnam government found that war was inevitable.


  • Vietnam
    Wednesday Mar 6, 1946

    Recognizing Vietnam as an autonomous State

    Vietnam
    Wednesday Mar 6, 1946

    When Chiang forced the French to give the French concessions in Shanghai back to China in exchange for withdrawing from northern Indochina, he had no choice but to sign an agreement with France on 6 March 1946 in which Vietnam would be recognized as an autonomous state in the Indochinese Federation and the French Union. The agreement soon broke down.


  • Haiphong, Vietnam
    Saturday Nov 23, 1946

    Haiphong Incident

    Haiphong, Vietnam
    Saturday Nov 23, 1946

    The bombardment of Haiphong by French forces at Hanoi only strengthened the belief that France had no intention of allowing an autonomous, independent state in Vietnam. The bombardment of Haiphong reportedly killed more than 6000 Vietnamese civilians. French forces marched into Hanoi, now the capital city of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.


  • Vietnam
    Thursday Dec 19, 1946

    Ho Chi Minh declared war against The French Union

    Vietnam
    Thursday Dec 19, 1946

    On 19 December 1946, after the Haiphong incident, Ho Chi Minh declared war against the French Union, marking the beginning of the Indochina War.


  • Moscow, Russia
    Feb, 1950

    Meeting Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong

    Moscow, Russia
    Feb, 1950

    In February 1950, after the successful removal of the French border blockade, he met with Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong in Moscow after the Soviet Union recognized his government. They all agreed that China would be responsible for backing the Việt Minh. Mao Zedong's emissary to Moscow stated in August that China planned to train 60,000–70,000 Viet Minh in the near future.


  • Vietnam
    Monday Feb 19, 1951

    The Chairman of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Vietnam

    Vietnam
    Monday Feb 19, 1951

    On 19 February 1951, Hồ Chí Minh became the Chairman of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Vietnam.


  • Geneva, Switzerland
    Monday Apr 26, 1954

    The 1954 Geneva Accords

    Geneva, Switzerland
    Monday Apr 26, 1954

    The 1954 Geneva Accords concluded between France and the Việt Minh, allowing the latter's forces to regroup in the North whilst anti-Communist groups settled in the South.


  • Điện Biên Phủ, Dien Bien, Vietnam
    Friday May 7, 1954

    The Battle of Dien Bien Phu

    Điện Biên Phủ, Dien Bien, Vietnam
    Friday May 7, 1954

    In 1954, after the crushing defeat of French Union forces at Battle of Dien Bien Phu, 2300 French soldiers died during the Battle of Dien Bien Phu more than 10000 french soldiers have surrendered to Vieth Minh. France gave up its fight against the Việt Minh, losing 70,000 soldiers from the eight years of the First Indochina War.


  • Geneva, Switzerland
    Tuesday Jul 20, 1954

    Resolving the remaining outstanding issues

    Geneva, Switzerland
    Tuesday Jul 20, 1954

    By the afternoon of 20 July, the remaining outstanding issues were resolved as the parties agreed that the partition line should be at the 17th parallel and the elections for a reunified government should be held in July 1956, two years after the ceasefire.


  • Vietnam
    Jun, 1956

    The Idea of overthrowing the South Vietnamese Government

    Vietnam
    Jun, 1956

    As early as June 1956 the idea of overthrowing the South Vietnamese government was presented at a politburo meeting.


  • Vietnam
    Thursday Nov 1, 1956

    The First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Vietnam

    Vietnam
    Thursday Nov 1, 1956

    On 1 November 1956, Hồ Chí Minh became the First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Vietnam.


  • Vietnam
    1959

    Hồ Chí Minh Informally chose Lê Duẩn to become the Next Party Leader

    Vietnam
    1959

    At the end of 1959, conscious that the national election would never be held and that Diem intended to purge opposing forces (mostly ex Việt Minh) from the South Vietnamese government, Hồ Chí Minh informally chose Lê Duẩn to become the next party leader.


  • Vietnam
    1959

    Confirming a "People's War" on the South

    Vietnam
    1959

    In 1959, Hồ Chí Minh began urging the Politburo to send aid to the Việt Cộng in South Vietnam and a "people's war" on the South was approved at a session in January 1959 and this decision was confirmed by the Politburo in March.


  • Laos
    Jul, 1959

    North Vietnam invaded Laos

    Laos
    Jul, 1959

    North Vietnam invaded Laos in July 1959 aided by the Pathet Lao and used 30,000 men to build a network of supply and reinforcement routes running through Laos and Cambodia that became known as the Hồ Chí Minh trail. It allowed the North to send manpower and materiel to the Việt Cộng with much less exposure to South Vietnamese forces, achieving a considerable advantage.


  • Vietnam
    Saturday Sep 10, 1960

    Lê Duẩn was officially named Party Leader

    Vietnam
    Saturday Sep 10, 1960

    Lê Duẩn was officially named party leader in 1960, leaving Hồ to function in a secondary role as head of state and member of the Politburo. He nevertheless maintained considerable influence in the government.


  • Vietnam
    Dec, 1960

    North Vietnam created the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam

    Vietnam
    Dec, 1960

    To counter the accusation that North Vietnam was violating the Geneva Accord, the independence of the Việt Cộng was stressed in Communist propaganda. North Vietnam created the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam in December 1960 as a "united front", or political branch of the Viet Cong intended to encourage the participation of non-Communists.


  • Vietnam
    Jul, 1967

    Meeting the Politburo in a High-Profile Conference

    Vietnam
    Jul, 1967

    In July 1967, Hồ Chí Minh and most of the Politburo of the Communist Party met in a high-profile conference where they concluded the war had fallen into a stalemate.


  • Vietnam
    Wednesday Jan 31, 1968

    Tet Offensive

    Vietnam
    Wednesday Jan 31, 1968

    With Hồ Chí Min's permission, the Việt Cộng planned a massive Tet Offensive that would commence on 31 January 1968, with the aim of taking much of the South by force and administering a heavy blow to the American military. The offensive was executed at great cost and with heavy casualties on Việt Cộng's political branches and armed forces.


  • Hanoi, Vietnam
    Tuesday Sep 2, 1969

    Death

    Hanoi, Vietnam
    Tuesday Sep 2, 1969

    With the outcome of the Vietnam War still in question, Hồ Chí Minh died of heart failure at his home in Hanoi at 9:47 on the morning of 2 September 1969; he was 79 years old.


  • Vietnam
    Thursday Sep 4, 1969

    The Mourning

    Vietnam
    Thursday Sep 4, 1969

    A week of mourning for his death was decreed nationwide in North Vietnam from 4 to 11 September 1969.


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