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  • Babylon
    Jun, 323 BC

    Alexander's death

    Babylon
    Jun, 323 BC

    Alexander, who quickly conquered the Persian Empire under its last Achaemenid dynast, Darius III, died young in 323 BC, leaving an expansive empire of partly Hellenised culture without an adult heir. The empire was put under the authority of a regent in the person of Perdiccas, and the territories were divided among Alexander's generals, who thereby became satraps, at the Partition of Babylon, all in that same year.




  • Present-Day in India
    321 BC

    Maurya Empire

    Present-Day in India
    321 BC

    In the region of Punjab, Chandragupta Maurya (Sandrokottos) founded the Maurya Empire in 321 BC.




  • Babylon
    312 BC

    Seleucid Empire establishment

    Babylon
    312 BC

    Seleucus established himself in Babylon in 312 BC, the year used as the foundation date of the Seleucid Empire.




  • Babylon
    311 BC

    Babylonian War

    Babylon
    311 BC

    The rise of Seleucus in Babylon threatened the eastern extent of Antigonus I territory in Asia. Antigonus, along with his son Demetrius I of Macedon, unsuccessfully led a campaign to annex Babylon. The victory of Seleucus ensured his claim of Babylon and legitimacy. He ruled not only Babylonia, but the entire enormous eastern part of Alexander's empire, as described by Appian: Always lying in wait for the neighboring nations, strong in arms and persuasive in council, he [Seleucus] acquired Mesopotamia, Armenia, 'Seleucid' Cappadocia, Persis, Parthia, Bactria, Arabia, Tapouria, Sogdia, Arachosia, Hyrcania, and other adjacent peoples that had been subdued by Alexander, as far as the river Indus, so that the boundaries of his empire were the most extensive in Asia after that of Alexander. The whole region from Phrygia to the Indus was subject to Seleucus.




  • Present-Day in India
    300s BC

    Seleucid–Mauryan relations

    Present-Day in India
    300s BC

    Expecting a confrontation, Seleucus gathered his army and marched to the Indus. It is said that Chandragupta could have fielded a conscript army of 600,000 men and 9,000 war elephants. But instead, a treaty occurred in which Chandragupta received, the vast territory west of the Indus, including the Hindu Kush, modern-day Afghanistan, and the Balochistan province of Pakistan. It is generally thought that Chandragupta married Seleucus's daughter, or a Macedonian princess, a gift from Seleucus to formalize an alliance. In a return gesture, Chandragupta sent 500 war elephants, a military asset that would play a decisive role at the Battle of Ipsus in 301 BC.




  • Eastern Anatolia
    301 BC

    Seleucus took control over eastern Anatolia and northern Syria

    Eastern Anatolia
    301 BC

    Following his and Lysimachus' victory over Antigonus Monophthalmus at the decisive Battle of Ipsus in 301 BC, Seleucus took control over eastern Anatolia and northern Syria.




  • Seleucia
    300s BC

    Seleucus established a new capital

    Seleucia
    300s BC

    An alternative capital was established at Seleucia on the Tigris, north of Babylon.


  • Seleucia, Seleucid Empire
    281 BC

    Seleucus's weak successor

    Seleucia, Seleucid Empire
    281 BC

    Seleucus's son and successor, Antiochus I Soter, was left with an enormous realm consisting of nearly all of the Asian portions of the Empire but faced with Antigonus II Gonatas in Macedonia and Ptolemy II Philadelphus in Egypt, he proved unable to pick up where his father had left off in conquering the European portions of Alexander's empire.


  • Sardis, Western Anatolia
    281 BC

    Battle of Corupedium

    Sardis, Western Anatolia
    281 BC

    Seleucus's empire reached its greatest extent following the defeat of his erstwhile ally, Lysimachus, at Corupedion in 281 BC, after which Seleucus expanded his control to encompass western Anatolia.


  • Ctesiphon, Parthian Empire (Present-Day in Iran and Iraq)
    247 BC

    Parthian Empire

    Ctesiphon, Parthian Empire (Present-Day in Iran and Iraq)
    247 BC

    The rulers of Persis, called Fratarakas, also seem to have established some level of independence from the Seleucids during the 3rd century BC, especially from the time of Vahbarz. They would later overtly take the title of Kings of Persis, before becoming vassals to the newly formed Parthian Empire.


  • Seleucia, Seleucid Empire
    246 BC

    Seleucus II Callinicus came to the throne

    Seleucia, Seleucid Empire
    246 BC

    Antiochus II's son Seleucus II Callinicus came to the throne around 246 BC.


  • Syria
    240s BC

    Seleucus II was soon dramatically defeated in the Third Syrian War

    Syria
    240s BC

    Seleucus II was soon dramatically defeated in the Third Syrian War against Ptolemy III of Egypt and then had to fight a civil war against his own brother Antiochus Hierax. Taking advantage of this distraction, Bactria and Parthia seceded from the empire.


  • Bactria (Present-Day Afghanistan)
    245 BC

    Bactria

    Bactria (Present-Day Afghanistan)
    245 BC

    Diodotus, governor for the Bactrian territory, asserted independence in around 245 BC, although the exact date is far from certain, to form the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom.


  • Antioch, Seleucid Empire
    223 BC

    Antiochus III the Great

    Antioch, Seleucid Empire
    223 BC

    A revival would begin when Seleucus II's younger son, Antiochus III the Great, took the throne in 223 BC.


  • Gaza
    Jun, 217 BC

    Battle of Raphia

    Gaza
    Jun, 217 BC

    Although initially unsuccessful in the Fourth Syrian War against Egypt, which led to a defeat at the Battle of Raphia (217 BC), Antiochus would prove himself to be the greatest of the Seleucid rulers after Seleucus I himself.


  • Egypt
    Jul, 204 BC

    Ptolemy IV died

    Egypt
    Jul, 204 BC

    When he returned to the west in 204 BC, Antiochus found that with the death of Ptolemy IV, the situation now looked propitious for another western campaign.


  • Banias
    200 BC

    Battle of Panium

    Banias
    200 BC

    Antiochus and Philip V of Macedon then made a pact to divide the Ptolemaic possessions outside of Egypt, and in the Fifth Syrian War, the Seleucids ousted Ptolemy V from the control of Coele-Syria. The Battle of Panium (200 BC) definitively transferred these holdings from the Ptolemies to the Seleucids. Antiochus appeared, at the least, to have restored the Seleucid Kingdom to glory.


  • Apamea, Syria
    188 BC

    Treaty of Apamea

    Apamea, Syria
    188 BC

    Following the defeat of his erstwhile ally Philip by Rome in 197 BC, Antiochus saw the opportunity for expansion into Greece itself. Encouraged by the exiled Carthaginian general Hannibal, and making an alliance with the disgruntled Aetolian League, Antiochus launched an invasion across the Hellespont. With his huge army, he aimed to establish the Seleucid empire as the foremost power in the Hellenic world, but these plans put the empire on a collision course with the new rising power of the Mediterranean, the Roman Republic. At the battles of Thermopylae (191 BC) and Magnesia (190 BC), Antiochus's forces suffered resounding defeats, and he was compelled to make peace and sign the Treaty of Apamea (188 BC), the main clause of which saw the Seleucids agree to pay a large indemnity, to retreat from Anatolia and to never again attempt to expand Seleucid territory west of the Taurus Mountains.


  • Seleucid Empire
    Jul, 187 BC

    Seleucus IV Philopator

    Seleucid Empire
    Jul, 187 BC

    The reign of his son and successor Seleucus IV Philopator (187–175 BC) was largely spent in attempts to pay the large indemnity, and Seleucus was ultimately assassinated by his minister Heliodorus.


  • Susa, Seleucid Empire
    Tuesday Jul 3, 187 BC

    Antiochus died

    Susa, Seleucid Empire
    Tuesday Jul 3, 187 BC

    Antiochus died in 187 BC on another expedition to the east, where he sought to extract money to pay the indemnity.


  • Seleucid Empire
    Sep, 175 BC

    Antiochus IV Epiphanes

    Seleucid Empire
    Sep, 175 BC

    Seleucus' younger brother, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, now seized the throne. He attempted to restore Seleucid power and prestige with a successful war against the old enemy, Ptolemaic Egypt, which met with initial success as the Seleucids defeated and drove the Egyptian army back to Alexandria itself. As the king planned on how to conclude the war, he was informed that Roman commissioners, led by the Proconsul Gaius Popillius Laenas, were near and requesting a meeting with the Seleucid king. Antiochus agreed, but when they met and Antiochus held out his hand in friendship, Popilius placed in his hand the tablets on which was written the decree of the senate and told him to read it. When the king said that he would call his friends into council and consider what he ought to do, Popilius drew a circle in the sand around the king's feet with the stick he was carrying and said, "Before you step out of that circle give me a reply to lay before the senate." For a few moments, he hesitated, astounded at such a peremptory order, and at last replied, "I will do what the senate thinks right." He then chose to withdraw rather than set the empire to war with Rome again.


  • Seleucid Empire
    161 BC

    Antiochus V Eupator, was first overthrown by Demetrius I Soter

    Seleucid Empire
    161 BC

    After the death of Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid Empire became increasingly unstable. Frequent civil wars made central authority tenuous at best. Epiphanes' young son, Antiochus V Eupator, was first overthrown by Seleucus IV's son, Demetrius I Soter in 161 BC.


  • Seleucid Empire
    150 BC

    Demetrius I overthrown in 150 BC by Alexander Balas

    Seleucid Empire
    150 BC

    Demetrius I, attempted to restore Seleucid power in Judea particularly but was overthrown in 150 BC by Alexander Balas – an impostor who (with Egyptian backing) claimed to be the son of Epiphanes.


  • Seleucid Empire
    145 BC

    Alexander Balas was overthrown by Demetrius II Nicator

    Seleucid Empire
    145 BC

    Alexander Balas reigned until 145 BC when he was overthrown by Demetrius I's son, Demetrius II Nicator. Demetrius II proved unable to control the whole of the kingdom, however. While he ruled Babylonia and eastern Syria from Damascus, the remnants of Balas' supporters – first supporting Balas' son Antiochus VI, then the usurping general Diodotus Tryphon – held out in Antioch.


  • Israel
    143 BC

    Jews in the form of the Maccabees had fully established their independence

    Israel
    143 BC

    Meanwhile, the decay of the Empire's territorial possessions continued apace. By 143 BC, the Jews in the form of the Maccabees had fully established their independence.


  • Iran
    139 BC

    Demetrius II was defeated in battle by the Parthians and was captured

    Iran
    139 BC

    Parthian expansion continued as well. In 139 BC, Demetrius II was defeated in battle by the Parthians and was captured. By this time, the entire Iranian Plateau had been lost to Parthian control.


  • Seleucid Empire
    138 BC

    Antiochus VII Sidetes took the throne after his brother's capture

    Seleucid Empire
    138 BC

    Demetrius Nicator's brother, Antiochus VII Sidetes, took the throne after his brother's capture. He faced the enormous task of restoring a rapidly crumbling empire, one facing threats on multiple fronts.


  • Syria, Iraq, and Iran
    133 BC

    Sidetes turned east with the full might of the Royal Army

    Syria, Iraq, and Iran
    133 BC

    Hard-won control of Coele-Syria was threatened by the Jewish Maccabee rebels. Once-vassal dynasties in Armenia, Cappadocia, and Pontus were threatening Syria and northern Mesopotamia; the nomadic Parthians, brilliantly led by Mithridates I of Parthia, had overrun upland Media (home of the famed Nisean horse herd); and Roman intervention was an ever-present threat. Sidetes managed to bring the Maccabees to heel and frighten the Anatolian dynasts into a temporary submission; then, in 133, he turned east with the full might of the Royal Army (supported by a body of Jews under the Hasmonean prince, John Hyrcanus) to drive back the Parthians.


  • Iran
    129 BC

    Battle of Ecbatana

    Iran
    129 BC

    Sidetes' campaign initially met with spectacular success, recapturing Mesopotamia, Babylonia, and Media. In the winter of 130/129 BC, his army was scattered in winter quarters throughout Media and Persis when the Parthian king, Phraates II, counter-attacked. Moving to intercept the Parthians with only the troops at his immediate disposal, he was ambushed and killed at the Battle of Ecbatana in 129 BC. Antiochus Sidetes is sometimes called the last great Seleucid king.


  • Seleucid Empire
    100 BC

    Weak Seleucids

    Seleucid Empire
    100 BC

    By 100 BC, the once-formidable Seleucid Empire encompassed little more than Antioch and some Syrian cities. Despite the clear collapse of their power, and the decline of their kingdom around them, nobles continued to play kingmakers on a regular basis, with occasional intervention from Ptolemaic Egypt and other outside powers. The Seleucids existed solely because no other nation wished to absorb them – seeing as they constituted a useful buffer between their other neighbors. In the wars in Anatolia between Mithridates VI of Pontus and Sulla of Rome, the Seleucids were largely left alone by both major combatants.


  • Seleucid Empire
    1983 BC

    Tigranes the Great invaded Seleucid Empire

    Seleucid Empire
    1983 BC

    Mithridates' ambitious son-in-law, Tigranes the Great, king of Armenia, however, saw an opportunity for expansion in the constant civil strife to the south. In 83 BC, at the invitation of one of the factions in the interminable civil wars, he invaded Syria and soon established himself as ruler of Syria, putting the Seleucid Empire virtually at an end.


  • Seleucid Empire (Present-Day Syria and Lebanon)
    1963 BC

    Annexed by Rome

    Seleucid Empire (Present-Day Syria and Lebanon)
    1963 BC

    Once Mithridates was defeated by Pompey in 63 BC, Pompey set about the task of remaking the Hellenistic East, by creating new client kingdoms and establishing provinces. While client nations like Armenia and Judea were allowed to continue with some degree of autonomy under local kings, Pompey saw the Seleucids as too troublesome to continue; doing away with both rival Seleucid princes, he made Syria into a Roman province.


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