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  • U.S.
    1811

    Claim

    U.S.
    1811

    William Du Bois claimed Elizabeth Freeman as his relative; he wrote that she had married his great-grandfather Jack Burghardt. But Freeman was 20 years older than Burghardt, and no record of such a marriage has been found. It may have been Freeman's daughter, Betsy Humphrey, who married Burghardt after her first husband, Jonah Humphrey, left the area "around 1811", and after Burghardt's first wife died (c. 1810). If so, Freeman would have been William Du Bois's step-great-great-grandmother. Anecdotal evidence supports Humphrey's marrying Burghardt; a close relationship of some form is likely.





  • Massachusetts, U.S.
    1860

    Alfred Du Bois immigrated to the United States

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    1860

    Sometime before 1860, Alfred Du Bois immigrated to the United States, settling in Massachusetts.





  • Housatonic, Great Barrington, Massachusettsm U.S.
    Tuesday Feb 05, 1867

    Alfred married Mary

    Housatonic, Great Barrington, Massachusettsm U.S.
    Tuesday Feb 05, 1867

    Alfred married Mary Silvina Burghardt on February 5, 1867, in Housatonic, a village in Great Barrington.





  • Great Barrington, Massachusetts, U.S.
    Sunday Feb 23, 1868

    Birth

    Great Barrington, Massachusetts, U.S.
    Sunday Feb 23, 1868

    William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born on February 23, 1868, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, to Alfred and Mary Silvina (née Burghardt) Du Bois.





  • Great Barrington, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1870

    Alfred left Mary

    Great Barrington, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1870

    Alfred left Mary in 1870, two years after their son William was born. Mary Du Bois moved with her son back to her parents' house in Great Barrington, and they lived there until he was five. She worked to support her family (receiving some assistance from her brother and neighbors), until she suffered a stroke in the early 1880s.



  • Massachusetts, U.S.
    1885

    Mother died

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    1885

    Mary died in 1885.



  • Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
    1885

    Du Bois attended Fisk University

    Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
    1885

    Relying on money donated by neighbors, Du Bois attended Fisk University, a historically black college in Nashville, Tennessee, from 1885 to 1888.



  • Harvard University, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1888

    Du Bois attended Harvard College

    Harvard University, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1888

    After receiving a bachelor's degree from Fisk, he attended Harvard College (which did not accept course credits from Fisk) from 1888 to 1890, where he was strongly influenced by his professor William James, prominent in American philosophy.



  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
    1890s

    Philadelphia's black neighborhoods had a negative reputation

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
    1890s

    By the 1890s, Philadelphia's black neighborhoods had a negative reputation in terms of crime, poverty, and mortality. Du Bois's book undermined the stereotypes with empirical evidence and shaped his approach to segregation and its negative impact on black lives and reputations. The results led Du Bois to realize that racial integration was the key to democratic equality in American cities.



  • Harvard University, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1891

    Du Bois received a scholarship to attend the sociology graduate school

    Harvard University, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1891

    In 1891, Du Bois received a scholarship to attend the sociology graduate school at Harvard.



  • Berlin University, Germany
    1892

    Du Bois received a fellowship to attend the University of Berlin

    Berlin University, Germany
    1892

    In 1892, Du Bois received a fellowship from the John F. Slater Fund for the Education of Freedmen to attend the University of Berlin for graduate work.



  • Wilberforce University, Ohio, U.S.
    1894

    Du Bois accepted a teaching job at Wilberforce University

    Wilberforce University, Ohio, U.S.
    1894

    In the summer of 1894, Du Bois received several job offers, including one from the prestigious Tuskegee Institute; he accepted a teaching job at Wilberforce University in Ohio. At Wilberforce, Du Bois was strongly influenced by Alexander Crummell, who believed that ideas and morals are necessary tools to effect social change.



  • Harvard University, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1895

    Du Bois was the first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University

    Harvard University, Massachusetts, U.S.
    1895

    After returning from Europe, Du Bois completed his graduate studies; in 1895 he was the first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University.



  • Wilberforce, Ohio, U.S.
    Tuesday May 12, 1896

    Marriage

    Wilberforce, Ohio, U.S.
    Tuesday May 12, 1896

    While at Wilberforce, Du Bois married Nina Gomer, one of his students, on May 12, 1896.



  • University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, U.S.
    1896

    Du Bois accepted a one-year research job from the University of Pennsylvania

    University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, U.S.
    1896

    After two years at Wilberforce, Du Bois accepted a one-year research job from the University of Pennsylvania as an "assistant in sociology" in the summer of 1896.



  • U.S.
    1897

    Du Bois presented a paper in which he rejected Frederick Douglass's plea for black Americans to integrate into white society

    U.S.
    1897

    While taking part in the American Negro Academy (ANA) in 1897, Du Bois presented a paper in which he rejected Frederick Douglass's plea for black Americans to integrate into white society. He wrote: "we are Negroes, members of a vast historic race that from the very dawn of creation has slept, but half awakening in the dark forests of its African fatherland".



  • Atlanta University, Georgia, U.S.
    Jul, 1897

    Du Bois left Philadelphia and took a professorship in history and economics at the historically black Atlanta University

    Atlanta University, Georgia, U.S.
    Jul, 1897

    In July 1897, Du Bois left Philadelphia and took a professorship in history and economics at the historically black Atlanta University in Georgia.



  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Aug 01, 1897

    Strivings of the Negro People

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Sunday Aug 01, 1897

    In the August 1897 issue of The Atlantic Monthly, Du Bois published "Strivings of the Negro People", his first work aimed at the general public, in which he enlarged upon his thesis that African Americans should embrace their African heritage while contributing to American society.



  • Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia, U.S.
    Sunday Apr 23, 1899

    Lynching of Sam Hose

    Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia, U.S.
    Sunday Apr 23, 1899

    Du Bois was inspired to greater activism by the lynching of Sam Hose, which occurred near Atlanta in 1899. Hose was tortured, burned and hung by a mob of two thousand whites. When walking through Atlanta to discuss the lynching with newspaper editor Joel Chandler Harris, Du Bois encountered Hose's burned knuckles in a storefront display. The episode stunned Du Bois, and he resolved that "one could not be a calm, cool, and detached scientist while Negroes were lynched, murdered, and starved". Du Bois realized that "the cure wasn't simply telling people the truth, it was inducing them to act on the truth".



  • Grand Palais, Petit Palais, Paris Métro in Paris, France
    Saturday Apr 14, 1900

    Paris Exhibition of 1900

    Grand Palais, Petit Palais, Paris Métro in Paris, France
    Saturday Apr 14, 1900

    Du Bois was primary organizer of The Exhibit of American Negroes at the Exposition Universelle held in Paris between April and November 1900, for which he put together a series of 363 photographs aiming to commemorate the lives of African Americans at the turn of the century and challenge the racist caricatures and stereotypes of the day.



  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Jul 23, 1900

    Du Bois attended the First Pan-African Conference

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Monday Jul 23, 1900

    In 1900, Du Bois attended the First Pan-African Conference, held in London from July 23 to 25.



  • U.S.
    1900

    Du Bois emerged as a spokesperson for his race

    U.S.
    1900

    In the first decade of the new century, Du Bois emerged as a spokesperson for his race, second only to Booker T. Washington.



  • U.S.
    1901

    Up from Slavery

    U.S.
    1901

    In 1901, Du Bois wrote a review critical of Washington's autobiography Up from Slavery.



  • U.S.
    1903

    The Souls of Black Folk

    U.S.
    1903

    In an effort to portray the genius and humanity of the black race, Du Bois published The Souls of Black Folk (1903), a collection of 14 essays.



  • Niagara Falls, Canada
    1905

    Du Bois and several other African-American civil rights activists met in Canada

    Niagara Falls, Canada
    1905

    In 1905, Du Bois and several other African-American civil rights activists – including Fredrick L. McGhee, Jesse Max Barber and William Monroe Trotter – met in Canada, near Niagara Falls.There they wrote a declaration of principles opposing the Atlanta Compromise, and incorporated as the Niagara Movement in 1906.



  • U.S.
    Dec, 1905

    Du Bois bought a printing press and started publishing Moon Illustrated Weekly

    U.S.
    Dec, 1905

    Du Bois and the other "Niagarites" wanted to publicize their ideals to other African Americans, but most black periodicals were owned by publishers sympathetic to Washington. Du Bois bought a printing press and started publishing Moon Illustrated Weekly in December 1905.



  • Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, U.S.
    Aug, 1906

    The Niagarites held a second conference

    Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, U.S.
    Aug, 1906

    The Niagarites held a second conference in August 1906, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of abolitionist John Brown's birth, at the West Virginia site of Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry.



  • U.S.
    1906

    President Teddy Roosevelt dishonorably discharged 167 black soldiers

    U.S.
    1906

    President Teddy Roosevelt dishonorably discharged 167 black soldiers because they were accused of crimes as a result of the Brownsville Affair. Many of the discharged soldiers had served for 20 years and were near retirement.



  • Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.
    Saturday Sep 22, 1906

    Atlanta race riot

    Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.
    Saturday Sep 22, 1906

    In September, riots broke out in Atlanta, precipitated by unfounded allegations of black men assaulting white women. This was a catalyst for racial tensions based on a job shortage and employers playing black workers against white workers. Ten thousand whites rampaged through Atlanta, beating every black person they could find, resulting in over 25 deaths.



  • U.S.
    1906

    Du Bois urged blacks to withdraw their support from the Republican Party

    U.S.
    1906

    In the aftermath of the 1906 violence, Du Bois urged blacks to withdraw their support from the Republican Party, because Republicans Roosevelt and William Howard Taft did not sufficiently support blacks. Most African Americans had been loyal to the Republican Party since the time of Abraham Lincoln.



  • Alexandria, Virginia, U.S.
    1907

    The Horizon: A Journal of the Color Line

    Alexandria, Virginia, U.S.
    1907

    Du Bois soon founded and edited another vehicle for his polemics, The Horizon: A Journal of the Color Line, which debuted in 1907. Freeman H. M. Murray and Lafayette M. Hershaw served as The Horizon's co-editors.



  • New York City, New York, U.S.
    May, 1909

    Du Bois attended the National Negro Conference

    New York City, New York, U.S.
    May, 1909

    In May 1909, Du Bois attended the National Negro Conference in New York. The meeting led to the creation of the National Negro Committee, chaired by Oswald Villard, and dedicated to campaigning for civil rights, equal voting rights, and equal educational opportunities.



  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Dec, 1909

    Du Bois was the first African American invited by the American Historical Association

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Dec, 1909

    Du Bois was the first African American invited by the American Historical Association (AHA) to present a paper at their annual conference. He read his paper, Reconstruction and Its Benefits, to an astounded audience at the AHA's December 1909 conference.



  • U.S.
    1910

    NAACP leaders offered Du Bois the position of Director of Publicity and Research

    U.S.
    1910

    NAACP leaders offered Du Bois the position of Director of Publicity and Research. He accepted the job in the summer of 1910, and moved to New York after resigning from Atlanta University.



  • U.S.
    Nov, 1910

    The Crisis

    U.S.
    Nov, 1910

    His primary duty was editing the NAACP's monthly magazine, which he named The Crisis. The first issue appeared in November 1910, and Du Bois pronounced that its aim was to set out "those facts and arguments which show the danger of race prejudice, particularly as manifested today toward colored people".



  • London, England, United Kingdom
    Wednesday Jul 26, 1911

    First Universal Races Congress

    London, England, United Kingdom
    Wednesday Jul 26, 1911

    In 1911 Du Bois attended the First Universal Races Congress in London and he published his first novel, The Quest of the Silver Fleece.



  • U.S.
    Monday Feb 08, 1915

    The Birth of a Nation

    U.S.
    Monday Feb 08, 1915

    Du Bois used his influential role in the NAACP to oppose a variety of racist incidents. When the silent film The Birth of a Nation premiered in 1915, Du Bois and the NAACP led the fight to ban the movie, because of its racist portrayal of blacks as brutish and lustful.



  • U.S.
    1916

    Du Bois and his supporters prevailed, and he continued in his role as editor

    U.S.
    1916

    During the years 1915 and 1916, some leaders of the NAACP – disturbed by financial losses at The Crisis, and worried about the inflammatory rhetoric of some of its essays – attempted to oust Du Bois from his editorial position. Du Bois and his supporters prevailed, and he continued in his role as editor.



  • U.S.
    1916

    Waco Horror

    U.S.
    1916

    The "Waco Horror" article covered the lynching of Jesse Washington, a mentally impaired 17-year-old African American. The article broke new ground by utilizing undercover reporting to expose the conduct of local whites in Waco, Texas.



  • U.S.
    1917

    Joel Spingarn established a camp to train African Americans to serve as officers in the United States military

    U.S.
    1917

    As the United States prepared to enter World War I in 1917, Du Bois's colleague in the NAACP, Joel Spingarn, established a camp to train African Americans to serve as officers in the United States military.



  • East St. Louis, Illinois, U.S.
    Jul, 1917

    East St. Louis riots

    East St. Louis, Illinois, U.S.
    Jul, 1917

    After the East St. Louis riots occurred in the summer of 1917, Du Bois traveled to St. Louis to report on the riots. Between 40 and 250 African Americans were massacred by whites, primarily due to resentment caused by St. Louis industry hiring blacks to replace striking white workers.



  • 57th Street, New York City, New York, U.S.
    Sunday Jul 29, 1917

    Silent Parade

    57th Street, New York City, New York, U.S.
    Sunday Jul 29, 1917

    To publicly demonstrate the black community's outrage over the riots, Du Bois organized the Silent Parade, a march of around 9,000 African Americans down New York City's Fifth Avenue, the first parade of its kind in New York, and the second instance of blacks publicly demonstrating for civil rights.



  • Houston, Texas, U.S.
    1917

    Houston riot of 1917

    Houston, Texas, U.S.
    1917

    The Houston riot of 1917 disturbed Du Bois and was a major setback to efforts to permit African Americans to become military officers. The riot began after Houston police arrested and beat two black soldiers; in response, over 100 black soldiers took to the streets of Houston and killed 16 whites. A military court martial was held, and 19 of the soldiers were hung, and 67 others were imprisoned. In spite of the Houston riot, Du Bois and others successfully pressed the Army to accept the officers trained at Spingarn's camp, resulting in over 600 black officers joining the Army in October 1917.



  • Paris, France
    Wednesday Feb 19, 1919

    Du Bois traveled to Europe to attend the first Pan-African Congress

    Paris, France
    Wednesday Feb 19, 1919

    When the war ended, Du Bois traveled to Europe in 1919 to attend the first Pan-African Congress and to interview African-American soldiers for a planned book on their experiences in World War I.



  • U.S.
    1919

    Red Summer

    U.S.
    1919

    Many blacks moved to northern cities in search of work, and some northern white workers resented the competition. This labor strife was one of the causes of the Red Summer of 1919, a horrific series of race riots across America.



  • U.S.
    1919

    The True Brownies

    U.S.
    1919

    In a 1919 column titled "The True Brownies", he announced the creation of The Brownies' Book, the first magazine published for African-American children and youth, which he founded with Augustus Granville Dill and Jessie Redmon Fauset.



  • U.S.
    Dec, 1919

    Du Bois documented the atrocities in the pages of The Crisis

    U.S.
    Dec, 1919

    Du Bois documented the atrocities in the pages of The Crisis.



  • New York City, New York, U.S.
    1919

    The only crime the black sharecroppers had committed

    New York City, New York, U.S.
    1919

    Infuriated with the distortions, Du Bois published a letter in the New York World, claiming that the only crime the black sharecroppers had committed was daring to challenge their white landlords by hiring an attorney to investigate contractual irregularities.



  • U.S.
    1920

    Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil

    U.S.
    1920

    In 1920, Du Bois published Darkwater: Voices From Within the Veil, the first of three autobiographies he would write.



  • London, Paris and Brussels
    Aug, 1921

    Second Pan-African Congress

    London, Paris and Brussels
    Aug, 1921

    Du Bois traveled to Europe in 1921 to attend the second Pan-African Congress. The assembled black leaders from around the world issued the London Resolutions and established a Pan-African Association headquarters in Paris.[170] Under Du Bois's guidance, the resolutions insisted on racial equality, and that Africa be ruled by Africans (not, as in the 1919 congress, with the consent of Africans).



  • U.S.
    1923

    The circulation of The Crisis had declined to 60,000

    U.S.
    1923

    When Du Bois sailed for Europe in 1923 for the third Pan-African Congress, the circulation of The Crisis had declined to 60,000 from its World War I high of 100,000, but it remained the preeminent periodical of the civil rights movement.



  • Liberia
    1923

    Envoy Extraordinary

    Liberia
    1923

    President Coolidge designated Du Bois an "Envoy Extraordinary" to Liberia and – after the third congress concluded – Du Bois rode a German freighter from the Canary Islands to Africa, visiting Liberia, Sierra Leone and Senegal.



  • U.S.S.R.
    1926

    Du Bois visited the Soviet Union

    U.S.S.R.
    1926

    Nine years after the 1917 Russian Revolution, Du Bois extended a trip to Europe to include a visit to the Soviet Union.



  • Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
    1929

    Debate with Lothrop Stoddard

    Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
    1929

    In 1929, a debate organised by the Chicago Forum Council billed as "One of the greatest debates ever held" was held between Du Bois and Lothrop Stoddard, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, proponent of eugenics and so called scientific racism.



  • Alabama, U.S.
    1931

    Scottsboro Boys

    Alabama, U.S.
    1931

    A rivalry emerged in 1931 between the NAACP and the Communist Party, when the Communists responded quickly and effectively to support the Scottsboro Boys, nine African-American youth arrested in 1931 in Alabama for rape.



  • U.S.
    1933

    Du Bois resigned his job at The Crisis

    U.S.
    1933

    Du Bois did not have a good working relationship with Walter Francis White, president of the NAACP since 1931. That conflict, combined with the financial stresses of the Great Depression, precipitated a power struggle over The Crisis. Du Bois, concerned that his position as editor would be eliminated, resigned his job at The Crisis and accepted an academic position at Atlanta University in early 1933.



  • U.S.
    1935

    Black Reconstruction in America

    U.S.
    1935

    Back in the world of academia, Du Bois was able to resume his study of Reconstruction, the topic of the 1910 paper that he presented to the American Historical Association. In 1935, he published his magnum opus, Black Reconstruction in America.



  • U.S.
    1938

    Canceled project

    U.S.
    1938

    In 1932, Du Bois was selected by several philanthropies – including the Phelps-Stokes Fund, the Carnegie Corporation, and the General Education Board – to be the managing editor for a proposed Encyclopedia of the Negro, a work Du Bois had been contemplating for 30 years. After several years of planning and organizing, the philanthropies canceled the project in 1938, because some board members believed that Du Bois was too biased to produce an objective encyclopedia.



  • U.S.
    1940

    Dusk of Dawn

    U.S.
    1940

    Dusk of Dawn, Du Bois's second autobiography, was published in 1940.



  • Atlanta University, Georgia, U.S.
    1943

    Du Bois was abruptly fired from his position at Atlanta University

    Atlanta University, Georgia, U.S.
    1943

    In 1943, at the age of 76, Du Bois was abruptly fired from his position at Atlanta University by college president Rufus Clement.



  • U.S.
    1943

    Back to NAACP

    U.S.
    1943

    Turning down job offers from Fisk and Howard, Du Bois re-joined the NAACP as director of the Department of Special Research. Surprising many NAACP leaders, Du Bois jumped into the job with vigor and determination.



  • San Francisco, California, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 25, 1945

    United Nations Conference on International Organization

    San Francisco, California, U.S.
    Wednesday Apr 25, 1945

    Du Bois was a member of the three-person delegation from the NAACP that attended the 1945 conference in San Francisco at which the United Nations was established.



  • Manchester, England
    1945

    Du Bois attended the fifth and final Pan-African Congress

    Manchester, England
    1945

    In late 1945, Du Bois attended the fifth, and final, Pan-African Congress, in Manchester, England.



  • U.S.
    1945

    Cold War and NAACP

    U.S.
    1945

    When the Cold War commenced in the mid-1940s, the NAACP distanced itself from Communists, lest its funding or reputation suffer. The NAACP redoubled their efforts in 1947 after Life magazine published a piece by Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. claiming that the NAACP was heavily influenced by Communists.



  • U.S.
    1946

    Du Bois ignored the NAACP's desires

    U.S.
    1946

    Ignoring the NAACP's desires, Du Bois continued to fraternize with communist sympathizers such as Paul Robeson, Howard Fast and Shirley Graham (his future second wife). Du Bois wrote "I am not a communist ... On the other hand, I ... believe ... that Karl Marx ... put his finger squarely upon our difficulties ...".



  • U.S.
    1948

    Du Bois resigned from the NAACP for the second time

    U.S.
    1948

    Du Bois's association with prominent communists made him a liability for the NAACP, especially since the FBI was starting to aggressively investigate communist sympathizers; so – by mutual agreement – he resigned from the NAACP for the second time in late 1948.



  • New York City, New York, U.S.
    1949

    Scientific and Cultural Conference for World Peace

    New York City, New York, U.S.
    1949

    In 1949, Du Bois spoke at the Scientific and Cultural Conference for World Peace in New York: "I tell you, people of America, the dark world is on the move! It wants and will have Freedom, Autonomy and Equality. It will not be diverted in these fundamental rights by dialectical splitting of political hairs ... Whites may, if they will, arm themselves for suicide. But the vast majority of the world's peoples will march on over them to freedom!"



  • U.S.
    1950

    Nina Died

    U.S.
    1950

    Nina Gomer died in 1950.



  • New York, U.S.
    1950

    Du Bois ran for U.S. Senator from New York

    New York, U.S.
    1950

    In 1950, at the age of 82, Du Bois ran for U.S. Senator from New York on the American Labor Party ticket and received about 200,000 votes, or 4% of the statewide total.



  • U.S.
    1952

    Second Marriage

    U.S.
    1952

    Du Bois married Shirley Graham.



  • Bandung, Indonesia
    Monday Apr 18, 1955

    U.S. government prevented Du Bois from attending the 1955 Bandung Conference

    Bandung, Indonesia
    Monday Apr 18, 1955

    The U.S. government prevented Du Bois from attending the 1955 Bandung Conference in Indonesia.



  • Ghana
    1957

    Nkrumah invited Du Bois to Ghana

    Ghana
    1957

    Nkrumah invited Du Bois to Ghana to participate in their independence celebration in 1957, but he was unable to attend because the U.S. government had confiscated his passport in 1951.



  • Russia and China
    1958

    Du Bois visited Russia and China

    Russia and China
    1958

    In 1958, Du Bois regained his passport, and with his second wife, Shirley Graham Du Bois, he traveled around the world, visiting Russia and China. In both countries he was celebrated. Du Bois later wrote approvingly of the conditions in both countries.



  • Ghana
    1960

    Du Bois celebrated the creation of the Republic of Ghana

    Ghana
    1960

    By 1960 – the "Year of Africa" – Du Bois had recovered his passport, and was able to cross the Atlantic and celebrate the creation of the Republic of Ghana.



  • Ghana
    Oct, 1961

    Du Bois and his wife traveled to Ghana to take up residence

    Ghana
    Oct, 1961

    In October 1961, at the age of 93, Du Bois and his wife traveled to Ghana to take up residence.



  • New York City, New York, U.S.
    Oct, 1961

    Du Bois joined the Communist Party

    New York City, New York, U.S.
    Oct, 1961

    Du Bois joined the Communist Party in October 1961, at the age of 93. Around that time, he wrote: "I believe in Communism. I mean by Communism, a planned way of life in the production of wealth and work designed for building a state whose object is the highest welfare of its people and not merely the profit of a part."



  • Ghana
    1963

    A citizen of Ghana

    Ghana
    1963

    In early 1963, the United States refused to renew his passport, so he made the symbolic gesture of becoming a citizen of Ghana.



  • Accra, Ghana
    Tuesday Aug 27, 1963

    Death

    Accra, Ghana
    Tuesday Aug 27, 1963

    Du Bois's health declined during the two years he was in Ghana, and he died on August 27, 1963, in the capital of Accra at the age of 95.



  • Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 28, 1963

    March on Washington

    Washington D.C., U.S.
    Wednesday Aug 28, 1963

    At the March on Washington, speaker Roy Wilkins asked the hundreds of thousands of marchers to honor Du Bois with a moment of silence.



  • Accra, Ghana
    Friday Aug 30, 1963

    State funeral

    Accra, Ghana
    Friday Aug 30, 1963

    Du Bois was given a state funeral on August 29–30, 1963, at Nkrumah's request, and buried beside the western wall of Christiansborg Castle (now Osu Castle), then the seat of government in Accra.



  • U.S.
    Thursday Jul 02, 1964

    Civil Rights Act of 1964

    U.S.
    Thursday Jul 02, 1964

    The Civil Rights Act of 1964, embodying many of the reforms Du Bois had campaigned for his entire life, was enacted almost a year after his death.



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