Historydraft LogoHistorydraft Logo
Historydraft
beta
Historydraft Logo
Historydraft
beta

  • Chang'an, China
    Sunday Jun 1, 2003
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Ping died

    Chang'an, China
    Sunday Jun 1, 2003

    Ping died after being poisoned by Wang Mang, who became acting emperor.




  • Chang'an, China
    Saturday Oct 6, 1923
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Lülin rebels stormed the Weiyang Palace and killed Wang

    Chang'an, China
    Saturday Oct 6, 1923

    Lülin rebels stormed the Weiyang Palace and killed Wang. The Gengshi Emperor ascended the throne, restoring the Han dynasty.




  • Luoyang, China
    Wednesday Aug 5, 1925
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Emperor Guangwu of Han took the title emperor

    Luoyang, China
    Wednesday Aug 5, 1925

    The Han warlord Emperor Guangwu of Han took the title emperor.




  • Chang'an, China
    Friday Jan 10, 2048
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Xuan died

    Chang'an, China
    Friday Jan 10, 2048

    Xuan "Emperor Xuan of Han" died.




  • China
    Friday Mar 29, 1957
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Ming of Han

    China
    Friday Mar 29, 1957

    Guangwu died. He was succeeded by his son Emperor Ming of Han.




  • China
    Thursday Jul 18, 1974
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Prince of Changyi was appointed emperor of Han by Huo Guang

    China
    Thursday Jul 18, 1974

    The Prince of Changyi was appointed emperor of Han by Huo Guang.




  • Chang'an, China
    Wednesday Aug 14, 1974
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Prince of Changyi was deposed

    Chang'an, China
    Wednesday Aug 14, 1974

    The Prince of Changyi was deposed.


  • Chang'an, Han, China
    Sunday Mar 29, 1987
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Wu died

    Chang'an, Han, China
    Sunday Mar 29, 1987

    Wu died. He was succeeded by his young son Emperor Zhao of Han, with Huo Guang, Jin Midi, and Shangguang Jie acting as regents.


  • China
    Friday Feb 13, 105
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    He of Han died

    China
    Friday Feb 13, 105

    He of Han died.


  • China
    Monday Apr 30, 125
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    An of Han died

    China
    Monday Apr 30, 125

    An died.


  • Han, China
    Monday Dec 10, 125
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Marquess of Beixiang died

    Han, China
    Monday Dec 10, 125

    The Marquess of Beixiang died.


  • Chang'an, China
    Thursday Mar 9, 141
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Jing died

    Chang'an, China
    Thursday Mar 9, 141

    Jing died. He was succeeded by his son Emperor Wu of Han.


  • Han, China
    Monday Feb 15, 145
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Chong of Han died

    Han, China
    Monday Feb 15, 145

    Chong of Han died.


  • Han, China
    Saturday Mar 6, 145
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Zhi of Han

    Han, China
    Saturday Mar 6, 145

    Chong's young third cousin Emperor Zhi of Han became emperor of the Han dynasty, with Liang Na acting as regent.


  • Han, China
    Tuesday Jul 26, 146
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Liang Ji poisoned Zhi

    Han, China
    Tuesday Jul 26, 146

    Liang Ji poisoned Zhi, killing him.


  • Han dynasty, China
    Monday Aug 1, 146
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Huan of Han

    Han dynasty, China
    Monday Aug 1, 146

    Emperor Huan of Han became emperor of the Han dynasty.


  • Chang'an, Han, China
    Wednesday Jul 6, 157
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Wen died

    Chang'an, Han, China
    Wednesday Jul 6, 157

    Wen died. He was succeeded by his son Emperor Jing of Han.


  • Han, China
    Monday Jan 25, 168
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Huan of Han died

    Han, China
    Monday Jan 25, 168

    Huan of Han died.


  • Han, China
    Wednesday May 13, 189
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Ling of Han died

    Han, China
    Wednesday May 13, 189

    Ling of Han died.


  • Han, China
    Monday Sep 28, 189
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Dong Zhuo deposed Liu Bian as emperor and appointed his brother Emperor Xian of Han

    Han, China
    Monday Sep 28, 189

    The Han general Dong Zhuo deposed Liu Bian as emperor and appointed his brother Emperor Xian of Han in his stead.


  • China
    Tuesday May 22, 192
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Dong was assassinated by his foster son Lü Bu

    China
    Tuesday May 22, 192

    Dong was assassinated by his foster son Lü Bu.


  • Chang'an, Han, China
    Monday Jun 1, 195
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Gaozu died

    Chang'an, Han, China
    Monday Jun 1, 195

    Gaozu died. He was succeeded by his son Emperor Hui of Han.


  • China
    Monday Sep 10, 210
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    Qin Shi Huang died

    China
    Monday Sep 10, 210

    Qin Shi Huang died from mercury pills made by his alchemists and court physicians; ironically these pills were meant to make Qin Shi Huang immortal.


  • Han, China
    Sunday Dec 10, 220
    Imperial China (Qin and Han dynasties)

    End of the Han dynasty

    Han, China
    Sunday Dec 10, 220

    Cao Cao's son Cao Pi forced Xian to abdicate the throne and declared himself emperor of Cao Wei.


  • China
    Friday Feb 18, 259
    Ancient China

    Qin Shi Huang is Born

    China
    Friday Feb 18, 259

    Qin Shi Huang is Born.


  • Mongol Empire (now China)
    Wednesday Sep 27, 1290
    Disasters with highest death tolls

    1290 Chihli Earthquake

    Mongol Empire (now China)
    Wednesday Sep 27, 1290

    The 1290 Chihli earthquake occurred on 27 September with an epicenter near Ningcheng, Zhongshu Sheng (Zhili or Chihli), Yuan Empire. The earthquake had an estimated surface wave magnitude of 6.8 and a maximum felt intensity of IX (Violent) on the Mercalli intensity scale. One estimate places the death toll at 7,270, while another has it at 100,000.


  • Mongol Empire (now China)
    Tuesday Sep 25, 1303
    Disasters with highest death tolls

    1303 Hongdong Earthquake

    Mongol Empire (now China)
    Tuesday Sep 25, 1303

    The 1303 Hongdong earthquake occurred in China, then part of the Mongol Empire, on September 25. The shock was estimated to have a magnitude of 8.0 and it had a maximum Mercalli intensity of XI (Extreme). With catastrophic damage, it was one of the deadliest recorded earthquakes of all time. In Taiyuan and Pingyang, nearly 100,000 houses collapsed and over 200,000 people died from collapsing buildings and loess caves in a similar manner to the situation that would be experienced 253 years later in the 1556 Shaanxi earthquake (陕西).


  • China
    Sunday Jan 22, 1556
    Disasters with highest death tolls

    1556 Shaanxi Earthquake

    China
    Sunday Jan 22, 1556

    The 1556 Shaanxi earthquake or Huaxian earthquake is the deadliest earthquake in recorded history: according to imperial records approximately 830,000 people lost their lives. It occurred on the morning of 23 January 1556 in Shaanxi, during the Ming Dynasty. More than 97 counties in the provinces of Shaanxi, Shanxi, Henan, Gansu, Hebei, Shandong, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu and Anhui were affected.


  • Qing Empire (now China)
    Wednesday Jul 25, 1668
    Disasters with highest death tolls

    1668 Shandong Earthquake

    Qing Empire (now China)
    Wednesday Jul 25, 1668

    1668 Shandong earthquake occurred on July 25, 1668, in Qing Empire (now China), there were an estimated 42,571 deaths.


  • Qing Empire (now China)
    Sunday Jun 19, 1718
    Disasters with highest death tolls

    1718 Gansu Earthquake

    Qing Empire (now China)
    Sunday Jun 19, 1718

    1718 Gansu earthquake occurred on June 19, 1718 in Qing Empire (now China), there were an estimated 73,000 deaths.


  • China
    Monday Aug 29, 1842
    Xinhai Revolution

    The First Opium War

    China
    Monday Aug 29, 1842

    After suffering its first defeat to the West in the First Opium War in 1842, the Qing imperial court struggled to contain foreign intrusions into China. Efforts to adjust and reform the traditional methods of governance were constrained by a deeply conservative court culture that did not want to give away too much authority to reform.


  • China
    Wednesday Oct 24, 1860
    Xinhai Revolution

    The Second Opium War

    China
    Wednesday Oct 24, 1860

    Following defeat in the Second Opium War in 1860, the Qing tried to modernize by adopting certain Western technologies through the Self-Strengthening Movement from 1861.


  • Shaoshan village, Hunan Province, China
    Tuesday Dec 26, 1893
    Mao Zedong

    Birth

    Shaoshan village, Hunan Province, China
    Tuesday Dec 26, 1893

    Mao Zedong was born on December 26, 1893, in Shaoshan village, Hunan Province, China.


  • Shanghai, China
    Wednesday Mar 28, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    The assassination of Kim Ok-gyun

    Shanghai, China
    Wednesday Mar 28, 1894

    On March 28, 1894, a pro-Japanese Korean revolutionary, Kim Ok-gyun, was assassinated in Shanghai. Kim had fled to Japan after his involvement in the 1884 coup and the Japanese had turned down Korean demands that he be extradited.


  • China
    Wednesday Aug 1, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    War was Officially Declared

    China
    Wednesday Aug 1, 1894

    On 1 August, war was officially declared between China and Japan.


  • Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Wednesday Sep 12, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    Transporting Troops to Dalian

    Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Wednesday Sep 12, 1894

    In early September, Li Hongzhang decided to reinforce the Chinese forces at Pyongyang by employing the Beiyang fleet to escort transports to the mouth of the Taedong River. About 4,500 additional troops stationed in the Zhili were to be redeployed. On September 12, half of the troops embarked at Dagu on five specially chartered transports and headed to Dalian where two days later on September 14, they were joined by another 2,000 soldiers.


  • Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Saturday Sep 15, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    Admiral Ding (Chinese fleet) decided To Return To Dalian

    Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Saturday Sep 15, 1894

    The Chinese warships spent the entire day cruising the area, waiting for the Japanese. However, since there was no sighting of the Japanese fleet, Admiral Ding decided to return to Dalian, reaching the port in the morning of September 15.


  • Manchuria
    Wednesday Oct 10, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Japanese pushed toward Manchuria

    Manchuria
    Wednesday Oct 10, 1894

    With the defeat at Pyongyang, the Chinese abandoned northern Korea and took up defensive positions in fortifications along their side of the Yalu River near Jiuliancheng. After receiving reinforcements by 10 October, the Japanese quickly pushed north toward Manchuria.


  • Liaodong Peninsula, Liaoning, China
    Wednesday Oct 24, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Japanese Landed on The Coast Liaodong Peninsula

    Liaodong Peninsula, Liaoning, China
    Wednesday Oct 24, 1894

    The Japanese 2nd Army Corps under Ōyama Iwao landed on the south coast of Liaodong Peninsula on 24 October.


  • Jinzhou, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Nov 6, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    Capturing Jinzhou

    Jinzhou, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Nov 6, 1894

    The Japanese quickly moved to capture Jinzhou and Dalian Bay on 6–7 November. The Japanese laid siege to the strategic port of Lüshunkou (Port Arthur).


  • Lüshunkou District, Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Nov 20, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Port Arthur massacre

    Lüshunkou District, Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Nov 20, 1894

    Describing their motives as having encountered a display of the mutilated remains of Japanese soldiers as they invaded the town, Japanese forces proceeded with the unrestrained killing of civilians during the Port Arthur Massacre with unconfirmed estimates in the thousands. An event which at the time was widely viewed with scepticism as the world at large was still in disbelief that the Japanese were capable of such deeds that seemed more likely to have been exaggerated propagandist fabrications of a Chinese government to discredit Japanese hegemony. In reality, the Chinese government itself was unsure of how to react and initially denied the occurrence of the loss of Port Arthur to the Japanese altogether.


  • Lüshunkou District, Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Wednesday Nov 21, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    Taking the City of Lüshunkou

    Lüshunkou District, Dalian, Liaoning, China
    Wednesday Nov 21, 1894

    By 21 November 1894, the Japanese had taken the city of Lüshunkou (Port Arthur) with minimal resistance and suffering minimal casualties.


  • Gaizhou, Yingkou, Liaoning, China
    Monday Dec 10, 1894
    First Sino-Japanese War

    Kaipeng (present-day Gaizhou) Fell to the Japanese

    Gaizhou, Yingkou, Liaoning, China
    Monday Dec 10, 1894

    By 10 December 1894, Kaipeng (present-day Gaizhou) fell to the Japanese 1st Army Corps.


  • Weihai, Shandong, China
    Saturday Jan 12, 1895
    First Sino-Japanese War

    Capturing Weihaiweii

    Weihai, Shandong, China
    Saturday Jan 12, 1895

    The Chinese fleet subsequently retreated behind the Weihaiwei fortifications. However, they were then surprised by Japanese ground forces, who outflanked the harbour's defenses in coordination with the navy. The Battle of Weihaiwei was a 23-day siege with the major land and naval components taking place between 20 January and 12 February 1895. Historian Jonathan Spence notes that "the Chinese admiral retired his fleet behind a protective curtain of contact mines and took no further part in the fighting." The Japanese commander marched his forces over the Shandong peninsula and reached the landward side of Weihaiwei, were the siege was eventually successful for the Japanese.


  • Yingkou, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Mar 5, 1895
    First Sino-Japanese War

    The Battle of Yingkou

    Yingkou, Liaoning, China
    Tuesday Mar 5, 1895

    After Weihaiwei's fall on 12 February 1895, and an easing of harsh winter conditions, Japanese troops pressed further into southern Manchuria and northern China. By March 1895 the Japanese had fortified posts that commanded the sea approaches to Beijing. Although this would be the last major battle fought; numerous skirmishes would follow. The Battle of Yinkou was fought outside the port town of Yingkou, Manchuria, on 5 March 1895.


  • China
    Wednesday Apr 17, 1895
    Xinhai Revolution

    The First Sino-Japanese War

    China
    Wednesday Apr 17, 1895

    In the wars against the Taiping (1851–64), Nian (1851–68), Yunnan (1856–68) and the Northwest (1862–77), the traditional imperial troops proved themselves incompetent and the court came to rely on local armies. In 1895, China suffered another defeat during the First Sino-Japanese War. This demonstrated that traditional Chinese feudal society also needed to be modernized if the technological and commercial advancements were to succeed.


  • Guangzhou, China
    Saturday Oct 26, 1895
    Xinhai Revolution

    The First Guangzhou Uprising

    Guangzhou, China
    Saturday Oct 26, 1895

    On 26 October 1895, Yeung Ku-wan and Sun Yat-sen led Zheng Shiliang and Lu Haodong to Guangzhou, preparing to capture Guangzhou in one strike. However, the details of their plans were leaked to the Qing government. The government began to arrest revolutionaries, including Lu Haodong, who was later executed. The first Guangzhou uprising was a failure.


  • China
    Thursday Aug 23, 1900
    Xinhai Revolution

    The Independence Army Uprising

    China
    Thursday Aug 23, 1900

    In 1901, after the Boxer Rebellion started, Tang Caichang and Tan Sitong of the previous Foot Emancipation Society organised the Independence Army. The Independence Army Uprising was planned to occur on 23 August 1900. Their goal was to overthrow Empress Dowager Cixi to establish a constitutional monarchy under the Guangxu Emperor. Their plot was discovered by the governor general of Hunan and Hubei. About twenty conspirators were arrested and executed.


  • Huizhou, Guangdong, China
    Monday Oct 8, 1900
    Xinhai Revolution

    Sun Yat-sen Ordered The Launch of The Huizhou Uprising

    Huizhou, Guangdong, China
    Monday Oct 8, 1900

    On 8 October 1900, Sun Yat-sen ordered the launch of the Huizhou Uprising. The revolutionary army was led by Zheng Shiliang and initially included 20,000 men, who fought for half a month. However, after the Japanese Prime Minister prohibited Sun Yat-sen from carrying out revolutionary activities on Taiwan, Zheng Shiliang had no choice but to order the army to disperse. This uprising therefore also failed. British soldier Rowland J. Mulkern participated in this uprising.


  • China
    Sunday Jan 25, 1903
    Xinhai Revolution

    The Great Ming Uprising

    China
    Sunday Jan 25, 1903

    A very short uprising occurred from 25 to 28 January 1903, to establish a "Great Ming Heavenly kingdom". This involved Tse Tsan-tai, Li Jitang, Liang Muguang and Hong Quanfu, who formerly took part in the Jintian uprising during the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom era.


  • Hunan, China
    Monday Feb 15, 1904
    Xinhai Revolution

    The Huaxinghui (China Revival Society)

    Hunan, China
    Monday Feb 15, 1904

    The Huaxinghui (China Revival Society) was founded in 1904 with notables like Huang Xing, Zhang Shizhao, Chen Tianhua and Song Jiaoren, along with 100 others. Their motto was "Take one province by force, and inspire the other provinces to rise up".


<