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  • Liverpool, England
    Mar, 1957

    The Quarrymen Band

    Liverpool, England
    Mar, 1957

    In March 1957, John Lennon, then aged sixteen, formed a skiffle group with several friends from Quarry Bank High School in Liverpool. They briefly called themselves the Blackjacks, before changing their name to the Quarrymen after discovering that a respected local group was already using the other name. Fifteen-year-old Paul McCartney joined them as a rhythm guitarist shortly after he and Lennon met that July.




  • Liverpool, England
    Feb, 1958

    The Joining of George Harrison

    Liverpool, England
    Feb, 1958

    In February 1958, McCartney invited his friend George Harrison to watch the band. The fifteen-year-old auditioned for Lennon, impressing him with his playing, but Lennon initially thought Harrison was too young for the band. After a month of Harrison's persistence, during a second meeting (arranged by McCartney), he performed the lead guitar part of the instrumental song "Raunchy" on the upper deck of a Liverpool bus, and they enlisted him as their lead guitarist.




  • Liverpool, England
    Jan, 1959

    Lennon at the Liverpool College of Art

    Liverpool, England
    Jan, 1959

    By January 1959, Lennon's Quarry Bank friends had left the group, and he began his studies at the Liverpool College of Art. The three guitarists, billing themselves at least three times as Johnny and the Moondogs,were playing rock and roll whenever they could find a drummer.




  • Liverpool, England
    Jan, 1960

    The Joining of Stuart Sutcliffe

    Liverpool, England
    Jan, 1960

    Lennon's art school friend Stuart Sutcliffe, who had just sold one of his paintings and was persuaded to purchase a bass guitar, joined in January 1960, and it was he who suggested changing the band's name to Beatals,




  • Hamburg, Germany
    Wednesday Aug 17, 1960

    Moving to Hamburg

    Hamburg, Germany
    Wednesday Aug 17, 1960

    Allan Williams, the Beatles' unofficial manager, arranged a residency for them in Hamburg, but lacking a full-time drummer they auditioned and hired Pete Best in mid-August 1960. The band, now a five-piece, left four days later, contracted to club owner Bruno Koschmider for what would be a 3​1⁄2-month residency.




  • Hamburg, Germany
    Sunday Nov 20, 1960

    Harrison's deportation

    Hamburg, Germany
    Sunday Nov 20, 1960

    When Koschmider learned they had been performing at the rival Top Ten Club in breach of their contract, he gave the band one month's termination notice,and reported the underage Harrison, who had obtained permission to stay in Hamburg by lying to the German authorities about his age. The authorities arranged for Harrison's deportation in late November.




  • EMI's Abbey Road Studios, London, England
    Wednesday Jun 06, 1962

    Martin's first recording session with the Beatles

    EMI's Abbey Road Studios, London, England
    Wednesday Jun 06, 1962

    Producer George Martin signed the Beatles to EMI's Parlophone label. His first recording session with the Beatles took place at EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London on 6 June 1962. Martin immediately complained to Epstein about Best's poor drumming and suggested they use a session drummer in his place.


  • England
    Thursday Aug 16, 1962

    Best's dismissal

    England
    Thursday Aug 16, 1962

    Already contemplating Best's dismissal, the Beatles replaced him in mid-August with Ringo Starr, who left Rory Storm and the Hurricanes to join them.


  • London, England
    Tuesday Sep 04, 1962

    The session at EMI

    London, England
    Tuesday Sep 04, 1962

    A 4 September session at EMI yielded a recording of "Love Me Do" featuring Starr on drums, but a dissatisfied Martin hired drummer Andy White for the band's third session a week later, which produced recordings of "Love Me Do", "Please Please Me" and "P.S. I Love You".


  • London, England
    Monday Feb 11, 1963

    Recording The Album "Please Please Me"

    London, England
    Monday Feb 11, 1963

    On 11 February 1963, the Beatles recorded ten songs during a single studio session for their debut LP, Please Please Me.


  • Heathrow Airport, London, England
    Thursday Oct 31, 1963

    Return to the UK

    Heathrow Airport, London, England
    Thursday Oct 31, 1963

    In late October, the Beatles began a five-day tour of Sweden. On their return to the UK on 31 October several hundred screaming fans greeted them in heavy rain at Heathrow Airport. Around 50 to 100 journalists and photographers as well as representatives from the BBC also joined the airport reception, the first of more than 100 such events.


  • John F. Kennedy Airport, New York, U.S.
    Friday Feb 07, 1964

    The First visit to United States

    John F. Kennedy Airport, New York, U.S.
    Friday Feb 07, 1964

    On 7 February 1964, the Beatles left the United Kingdom with an estimated 4,000 fans gathered at Heathrow, waving and screaming as the aircraft took off. Upon landing at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport, an uproarious crowd estimated at 3,000 greeted them.


  • U.S.
    Sunday Feb 09, 1964

    The First Live US Television Performance

    U.S.
    Sunday Feb 09, 1964

    They gave their first live US television performance two days later on The Ed Sullivan Show, watched by approximately 73 million viewers in over 23 million households, or 34 per cent of the American population.


  • London, England
    Saturday Feb 22, 1964

    Returning to the UK

    London, England
    Saturday Feb 22, 1964

    The band flew to Florida, where they appeared on the weekly Ed Sullivan Show a second time, before another 70 million viewers, before returning to the UK on 22 February.


  • England
    Monday Jul 06, 1964

    The Movie "A Hard Day's Night"

    England
    Monday Jul 06, 1964

    Capitol Records' lack of interest throughout 1963 did not go unnoticed, and a competitor, United Artists Records, encouraged their film division to offer the Beatles a three-motion-picture deal, primarily for the commercial potential of the soundtracks in the US. Directed by Richard Lester, A Hard Day's Night involved the band for six weeks in March–April 1964 as they played themselves in a musical comedy. The film premiered in London and New York in July and August, respectively, and was an international success, with some critics drawing comparison with the Marx Brothers.


  • Florida, U.S.
    Friday Sep 11, 1964

    The 11 September concert problem segregated

    Florida, U.S.
    Friday Sep 11, 1964

    During the 1964 US tour, the group were confronted with the reality of racial segregation in the country at the time, particularly in the South. When informed that the venue for their 11 September concert, the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Florida, was segregated, the Beatles said they would refuse to perform unless the audience was integrated. Lennon stated: "We never play to segregated audiences and we aren't going to start now ... I'd sooner lose our appearance money." City officials relented and agreed to allow an integrated show. The group also cancelled their reservations at the whites-only Hotel George Washington in Jacksonville.


  • Shea Stadium, New York, U.S.
    Sunday Aug 15, 1965

    The Opening Concert of The third US tour

    Shea Stadium, New York, U.S.
    Sunday Aug 15, 1965

    The group's third US tour opened with a performance before a world-record crowd of 55,600 at New York's Shea Stadium on 15 August 1965 – "perhaps the most famous of all Beatles' concerts", in Lewisohn's description


  • Buckingham Palace, London, England
    Tuesday Oct 26, 1965

    Receive Their (MBE) Medals

    Buckingham Palace, London, England
    Tuesday Oct 26, 1965

    The Beatles went to Buckingham Palace to receive their (MBE) medals from the Queen on October 26, 1965, after Queen Elizabeth II appointed all four Beatles Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) after Prime Minister Harold Wilson nominated them for the award.


  • England
    Friday Mar 04, 1966

    Lennon's comment

    England
    Friday Mar 04, 1966

    Almost as soon as they returned home, the Beatles faced a fierce backlash from US religious and social conservatives (as well as the Ku Klux Klan) over a comment Lennon had made in a March interview with British reporter Maureen Cleave. "Christianity will go," Lennon had said. "It will vanish and shrink. I needn't argue about that; I'm right and I will be proved right. ... Jesus was alright but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It's them twisting it that ruins it for me."


  • U.S.
    Aug, 1966

    The Datebook magazine Publish Lennon's comment

    U.S.
    Aug, 1966

    Lennon's comment went virtually unnoticed in England, but when US teenage fan magazine Datebook printed it five months later – on the eve of the group's August US tour – it sparked a controversy with Christians in the American "Bible Belt". The Vatican issued a protest, and bans on Beatles' records were imposed by Spanish and Dutch stations and South Africa's national broadcasting service.


  • Candlestick Park, San Francisco, California, USA
    Monday Aug 29, 1966

    The last commercial concert a four-year period

    Candlestick Park, San Francisco, California, USA
    Monday Aug 29, 1966

    The band's concert at San Francisco's Candlestick Park on 29 August was their last commercial concert. It marked the end of a four-year period dominated by almost nonstop touring that included over 1,400 concert appearances internationally.


  • The World
    Sunday Jun 25, 1967

    The First Live Global Television Link

    The World
    Sunday Jun 25, 1967

    On 25 June 1967, the Beatles performed their forthcoming single, "All You Need Is Love", to an estimated 350 million viewers on Our World, the first live global television link. Released a week later, during the Summer of Love, the song was adopted as a flower power anthem.


  • England
    Wednesday Aug 20, 1969

    The Last Occasion on which all Four Beatles Were Together

    England
    Wednesday Aug 20, 1969

    The completion and mixing of "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" on 20 August 1969 was the last occasion on which all four Beatles were together in the same studio.


  • England
    Saturday Sep 20, 1969

    Lennon Announced His Departure

    England
    Saturday Sep 20, 1969

    Lennon announced his departure to the rest of the group on 20 September, but agreed to withhold a public announcement to avoid undermining sales of the forthcoming album.


  • England
    Friday Apr 10, 1970

    McCartney Publicly announced his departure

    England
    Friday Apr 10, 1970

    McCartney was unhappy with the producer's approach and particularly dissatisfied with the lavish orchestration on "The Long and Winding Road", which involved a fourteen-voice choir and 36-piece instrumental ensemble. McCartney's demands that the alterations to the song be reverted were ignored, and he publicly announced his departure from the band on 10 April 1970, a week before the release of his first, self-titled solo album.


  • U.S.
    Friday May 08, 1970

    The Beatle's Last

    U.S.
    Friday May 08, 1970

    On 8 May, the Spector-produced Let It Be was released. Its accompanying single, "The Long and Winding Road", was the Beatles' last; it was released in the United States, but not in the UK.


  • England
    Thursday Dec 31, 1970

    McCartney filed a suit

    England
    Thursday Dec 31, 1970

    McCartney filed suit for the dissolution of the Beatles' contractual partnership on 31 December 1970.


  • Walt Disney World Resort, Florida, USA
    Sunday Dec 29, 1974

    John Lennon signed The Paperwork Terminating The Partnership

    Walt Disney World Resort, Florida, USA
    Sunday Dec 29, 1974

    Legal disputes continued long after their break-up, and the dissolution was not formalised until 29 December 1974, when John Lennon signed the paperwork terminating the partnership while on vacation with his family at Walt Disney World Resort in Florida.


  • New York, U.S.
    Monday Dec 08, 1980

    Lennon's Death

    New York, U.S.
    Monday Dec 08, 1980

    In December 1980, Lennon was shot and killed outside his New York City apartment.


  • Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York, U.S.
    Wednesday Jan 20, 1988

    The Beatles were Inducted Into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

    Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York, U.S.
    Wednesday Jan 20, 1988

    In 1988, the Beatles were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, their first year of eligibility. Harrison and Starr attended the ceremony with Lennon's widow, Yoko Ono, and his two sons, Julian and Sean. McCartney declined to attend, citing unresolved "business differences" that would make him "feel like a complete hypocrite waving and smiling with them at a fake reunion".


  • The World
    Monday Nov 13, 2000

    The Beatle's 1

    The World
    Monday Nov 13, 2000

    The Beatles' 1, a compilation album of the band's British and American number-one hits, was released on 13 November 2000. It became the fastest-selling album of all time, with 3.6 million sold in its first week and 13 million within a month. It topped albums charts in at least 28 countries. As of April 2009, the compilation had sold 31 million copies globally, and is the best-selling album of that decade in the United States.


  • Los Angeles, California, U.S.
    Thursday Nov 29, 2001

    Harrison's Death

    Los Angeles, California, U.S.
    Thursday Nov 29, 2001

    Harrison died from metastatic lung cancer in November 2001.


  • Staples Center, Los Angeles, USA
    Sunday Jan 26, 2014

    McCartney and Starr performed together

    Staples Center, Los Angeles, USA
    Sunday Jan 26, 2014

    On 26 January 2014, McCartney and Starr performed together at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards, held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.


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