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  • Carlsbad, Czech Republic
    Sunday Jul 7, 1720

    Johann Sebastian Bach

    Bach's wife suddenly died

    Carlsbad, Czech Republic
    Sunday Jul 7, 1720

    On 7 July 1720, while Bach was away in Carlsbad with Prince Leopold, Bach's wife suddenly died.




  • Olmütz (Present Day Olomouc), Czech Republic
    Monday Oct 26, 1767

    Mozart

    Mozart and smallpox

    Olmütz (Present Day Olomouc), Czech Republic
    Monday Oct 26, 1767

    Wolfgang had shown the first smallpox symptoms. Because of the incubation time of the disease (about 12 days), it can be known that he had already contracted it in Vienna, Leopold called Doctor Wolff and Mozart was told to rest for at least a few months, he was so sick that he could see nothing for nine days and had to spare his eyes for several weeks after his recovery, Mozart was much better in December and the family mooted.




  • Prague, Austro-Hungarian Empire (Present Day Czech)
    Tuesday Sep 6, 1791

    Mozart

    Feeling ill

    Prague, Austro-Hungarian Empire (Present Day Czech)
    Tuesday Sep 6, 1791

    Mozart fell ill while in Prague for the premiere, on 6 September 1791, of his opera La clemenza di Tito, which was written in that same year on commission for the Emperor's coronation festivities, His health deteriorated on 20 November, at which point he became bedridden, suffering from swelling, pain, and vomiting.




  • Austerlitz, Moravia, Holy Roman Empire (now Slavkov u Brna, Czech Republic)
    Monday Dec 2, 1805

    Holy Roman Empire

    Battle of the Three Emperors

    Austerlitz, Moravia, Holy Roman Empire (now Slavkov u Brna, Czech Republic)
    Monday Dec 2, 1805

    The Battle of Austerlitz (2 December 1805/11 Frimaire An XIV FRC), also known as the Battle of the Three Emperors, was one of the most important and decisive engagements of the Napoleonic Wars. In what is widely regarded as the greatest victory achieved by Napoleon, the Grande Armée of France defeated a larger Russian and Austrian army led by Emperor Alexander I and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II. The battle occurred near the town of Austerlitz in the Austrian Empire (modern-day Slavkov u Brna in the Czech Republic). Austerlitz brought the War of the Third Coalition to a rapid end, with the Treaty of Pressburg signed by the Austrians later in the month. The battle is often cited as a tactical masterpiece, in the same league as other historic engagements like Cannae or Gaugamela.




  • Austerlitz, Moravia, Austrian Empire (Present Day Slavkov u Brna, Czech Republic)
    Monday Dec 2, 1805

    Napoleon

    Battle of Austerlitz

    Austerlitz, Moravia, Austrian Empire (Present Day Slavkov u Brna, Czech Republic)
    Monday Dec 2, 1805

    At this critical juncture, both Tsar Alexander I and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II decided to engage Napoleon in battle, despite reservations from some of their subordinates. Napoleon sent his army north in pursuit of the Allies, but then ordered his forces to retreat so that he could feign a grave weakness. At the Battle of Austerlitz, in Moravia on 2 December, he deployed the French army below the Pratzen Heights and deliberately weakened his right flank, enticing the Allies to launch a major assault there in the hopes of rolling up the whole French line.




  • Znojmo, Czech Republic
    Wednesday Jul 12, 1809

    Napoleon

    Armistice of Znaim

    Znojmo, Czech Republic
    Wednesday Jul 12, 1809

    The French were too exhausted to pursue the Austrians immediately, but Napoleon eventually caught up with Charles at Znaim and the latter signed an armistice on 12 July.




  • Auschitz, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary (Present-Day Czech Republic)
    Thursday Nov 21, 1889

    Audrey Hepburn

    Father Joseph

    Auschitz, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary (Present-Day Czech Republic)
    Thursday Nov 21, 1889

    Audrey's father, Joseph Victor Anthony Ruston (21 November 1889 – 16 October 1980), was a British subject born in Auschitz, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary. He was the son of Victor John George Ruston, of British and Austrian background, and Anna Wels, who was of Austrian origin and born in Kovarce.


  • Zwittau, Moravia, Austria-Hungary (Now: Czech Republic)
    Tuesday Apr 28, 1908

    Oskar Schindler (Schindler's List)

    Birth

    Zwittau, Moravia, Austria-Hungary (Now: Czech Republic)
    Tuesday Apr 28, 1908

    Schindler was born on 28 April 1908, into a Sudeten German family in Zwittau, Moravia, Austria-Hungary. His father was Johann "Hans" Schindler, the owner of a farm machinery business, and his mother was Franziska "Fanny" Schindler (née Luser). His sister, Elfriede, was born in 1915.


  • Czech Republic
    Tuesday Mar 6, 1928

    Oskar Schindler (Schindler's List)

    Marriage

    Czech Republic
    Tuesday Mar 6, 1928

    On 6 March 1928, Schindler married Emilie Pelzl (1907–2001), daughter of a prosperous Sudeten German farmer from Maletein. The young couple moved in with Oskar's parents and occupied the upstairs rooms, where they lived for the next seven years.


  • Czech Rep. (Czechoslovakia that time)
    Wednesday Mar 15, 1939

    Adolf Hitler

    Invade Prague

    Czech Rep. (Czechoslovakia that time)
    Wednesday Mar 15, 1939

    On 15 March 1939, in violation of the Munich accord and possibly as a result of the deepening economic crisis requiring additional assets, Hitler ordered the Wehrmacht to invade Prague, and from Prague Castle he proclaimed Bohemia and Moravia a German protectorate.


  • Brünnlitz, Czech Republic
    Sunday Oct 15, 1944

    Oskar Schindler (Schindler's List)

    Schindler Efforts

    Brünnlitz, Czech Republic
    Sunday Oct 15, 1944

    In addition to workers, Schindler moved 250 wagon loads of machinery and raw materials to the new factory. Few if any useful artillery shells were produced at the plant. When officials from the Armaments Ministry questioned the factory's low output, Schindler bought finished goods on the black market and resold them as his own. The rations provided by the SS were insufficient to meet the needs of the workers, so Schindler spent most of his time in Kraków, obtaining food, armaments, and other materials. His wife Emilie remained in Brünnlitz, surreptitiously obtaining additional rations and caring for the workers' health and other basic needs. Schindler also arranged for the transfer of as many as 3,000 Jewish women out of Auschwitz to small textiles plants in the Sudetenland in an effort to increase their chances of surviving the war.


  • Brünnlitz, Czech Republic
    Sunday Oct 15, 1944

    Oskar Schindler (Schindler's List)

    Schindler's list

    Brünnlitz, Czech Republic
    Sunday Oct 15, 1944

    On 15 October 1944, a train carrying 700 men on Schindler's list was initially sent to the concentration camp at Gross-Rosen, where the men spent about a week before being re-routed to the factory in Brünnlitz. Three hundred female Schindlerjuden were similarly sent to Auschwitz, where they were in imminent danger of being sent to the gas chambers. Schindler's usual connections and bribes failed to obtain their release. Finally, after he sent his secretary, Hilde Albrecht, with bribes of black market goods, food, and diamonds, the women were sent to Brünnlitz after several harrowing weeks in Auschwitz.


  • Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Thursday Feb 12, 1948

    1948 Czechoslovak coup d'état

    The demands of The non-Communists in The Cabinet

    Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Thursday Feb 12, 1948

    On 12 February, the non-Communists in the cabinet demanded punishment for the offending Communists in the government and an end to their supposed subversion.


  • Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Saturday Feb 21, 1948

    1948 Czechoslovak coup d'état

    Twelve Non-Communist Ministers Resigned

    Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Saturday Feb 21, 1948

    Nosek, backed by Gottwald, refused to yield. He and his fellow Communists threatened to use force and, in order to avoid defeat in parliament, mobilised groups of their supporters in the country. On 21 February, twelve non-Communist ministers resigned in protest after Nosek refused to reinstate eight non-Communist senior police officers despite a majority vote of the cabinet in favour of doing so.


  • Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Wednesday Feb 25, 1948

    1948 Czechoslovak coup d'état

    Beneš Capitulated

    Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Wednesday Feb 25, 1948

    On 25 February 1948, Beneš, fearful of civil war and Soviet intervention, capitulated. He accepted the resignations of the non-Communist ministers and appointed a new government in accordance with KSČ (Communist Party of Czechoslovakia) demands.


  • Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Sunday May 9, 1948

    1948 Czechoslovak coup d'état

    The Parliament approved a New Constitution

    Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Sunday May 9, 1948

    On 9 May, a new constitution was approved by parliament. Although it declared Czechoslovakia a "people's democracy" under the leadership of the KSČ, it was not a completely Communist document. However, it was close enough to the Soviet model that Beneš refused to sign it.


  • Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Sunday May 30, 1948

    1948 Czechoslovak coup d'état

    The 30 May Elections

    Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Sunday May 30, 1948

    At the 30 May elections, voters were presented with a single list from the National Front, which officially won 89.2% of the vote; within the National Front list, the Communists had an absolute majority of 214 seats (160 for the main party and 54 for the Slovak branch). This majority grew even larger when the Social Democrats merged with the Communists later in the year.


  • Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Wednesday Jun 2, 1948

    1948 Czechoslovak coup d'état

    Beneš's Resignation

    Prague, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Wednesday Jun 2, 1948

    Beneš resigned on 2 June and was succeeded by Gottwald twelve days later.


  • Sezimovo Ústí, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Friday Sep 3, 1948

    1948 Czechoslovak coup d'état

    Beneš's Death

    Sezimovo Ústí, Czechia (Then Czechoslovakia)
    Friday Sep 3, 1948

    Beneš died in September, bringing a symbolic close to the sequence of events, and was buried before an enormous and silent throng come to mourn the passing of a popular leader and of the democracy he had come to represent.


  • Europe
    Tuesday Dec 7, 2010

    Visa Inc.

    WikiLeaks

    Europe
    Tuesday Dec 7, 2010

    Visa Europe began suspending payments to WikiLeaks on December 7, 2010.


  • Czech Republic
    Monday Feb 25, 2013

    IKEA

    The Company removed the Swedish meatballs from stores' shelves

    Czech Republic
    Monday Feb 25, 2013

    In February 2013, IKEA announced it had pulled 17,000 portions of Swedish meatballs containing beef and pork from stores in Europe after testing in the Czech Republic found traces of horsemeat in the product. The company removed the Swedish meatballs from stores' shelves on 25 February 2013, but only made the announcement public after Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet uncovered what happened.


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